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Your letter of the 24th, with the report, is before me; & such observations as occur, shall be handed to you. In plowing the drilled Corn, it is to be remembered, that throwing the furrow always to the plant, will leave the land in high ridges; and make it more liable to wash, & run into Gullies; to avoid wch, was one of my principal motives for introducing the Hoe & common Iron toothed...
Letter not found: to George Augustine Washington, 24 Dec. 1785. On 3 Feb. 1786 George Augustine Washington acknowledged receipt of “Your favor of the 24th Decr.”
As soon as I got your letter announcing your intention of spending the Winter at Charleston I wrote you by Post, under cover to Colo. Willm Washington—& sometime after by Mr Laurens—by whom also I forwarded the articles of clothing you desired might be sent to you—there can be little doubt (as the Post now goes regularly) of both getting to hand. I need not therefore repeat any part of the...
I am very sorry to find by the last letters from Mount Vernon that you continue indisposed —My wish is, that you would not, in order to facilitate my business, expose yourself to what you have not a Constitution to bear. If a person is not able to undergo the heat of the Sun, or the fatiegue of exercise in warm weather, no good, but real evil, will result from the attempt; and therefore no...
After short stages and easy driving, I reached this City on Sunday afternoon. Only 4 states—viz. Virginia, South Carolina, New York and the one we are in, are as yet, represented; which is highly vexatious to those who are idly, & expensively spending their time here. I hope the fine rains which have watered this part of the Country were not confined to it; or rather, that the Clouds which...
Not having received any letter from you last Week (by the Post which arrives here on Thursdays) I have, of course, nothing to reply to; but request to be informed of the depth of the Well (by the Kitchen door) from the level of the Brick pavement, which surrds it, to the surface of the Water within; and the depth of the Water. To be clear, if I am not so already, I want the whole depth from...
My last letter to you, was dispatched without the enclosed; wch was forgot at the time of Sealing it. Since then, I have received your letter of the 23d of August, & am very sorry to find by it that you still continue so much indispos’d. Doctr Craik will write to you by this opportunity, & will, I presume, give you his opinion of the propriety of giving the Air & Climate of Rhode Island a...
Having given very full & ample details of the intended crops—and my ideas of the modes of managing them at the several Plantations, little, if these are observed, need be added on this subject. But as the profit of every Farm is greater, or less in proportion to the quantity of manure which is made thereon, or can be obtained; and by keeping the fields in good condition. These two important...
For the benefit of exercise, I left the City at 5 Oclock on Sunday Morning, and did not return in time to write by the Post on Monday. I now acknowledge the receipt of your letter and report of the 15th & shall observe upon such parts of them as may require it. I would not wish you to ask Mr Lund Washington for Dows Bond—but when you see him you may tell him that I had directed you (if it was...
Your last letter of the 27th ulto came in due course of Post, and gave me the pleasure to hear that you had had a continuance of rain. Seasonable weather may bring on young Corn, & help that which was not too far gone. At any rate the Buck Wheat, and vegitables of every kind, must receive benefit. When I expressed a wish to have the race widened from the mill upwards, it was on a supposition...
I have received two letters from you at Barbadoes, & three from Burmuda. The last informing me of your intention to embark for Charleston, which I much approve of. I have not wrote to you since you left Mount Vernon, first because I did not know where to direct to you & next because I was on the Western waters when your first letters from Burmuda came to this place. My best wishes however have...
Your letter of the 22d is before me. If the outer doors of the New room are adapted to receive Mortice locks, it will make the room more uniform; and I can get them here of good quality from Seven Inches downwards—I shall decline sending any kind ’till I hear from you again thinking it best that the whole should be of this kind if any are. Perceiving you have little chance of sowing much Wheat...
This, in acknowledgment of your letter of the 2d of this Month, is probably the last letter I shall write you from this place; as the probability is, that the Convention will have compleated the business which brought the delegates together, in the course of this Week. God grant I may not be disappointed in this expectation, as I am quite homesick. As Mr McPhearson’s glass (if good) is cheaper...
It is natural for young married people, who are launching into life, to look forward to a permanent establishment. If they are prudent, they will be reasonably sollicitous to provide for those who come after, & have a right to look to them for support. It is also natural for those who have passed the meridian of life, & are descending into the shades of darkness, to make arrangements for the...
Letter not found: to George Augustine Washington, 8 Dec. 1784. On 25 Feb. 1785 George Augustine wrote to GW : “I received with inexpressible pleasure Your two friendly Letters of the 26th of Novr, and 8th of Decr.”
The extreme heaviness of the roads occasioned by the late rains, and gullied situation, prevented my getting further than this place yesterday. and now I am waiting a while for a cessation of rain, rather than to take Joe out in it. It did not occur to me when I was making out my Memorandum for you, that the cause which prevented Morris from proceeding in his field for experiments, might not...
This letter is in acknowledgement of yours of the 5th Instt —and painful indeed it is to find that the drought should continue with such unremitting violence with you, when from other parts (and indeed in your own Neighbourhd) by acct, it is seasonable; and is as much so here as could be wished. By the Dolphin, Captn Steward, I have sent some Goods, and other articles round; which I hope will...
Giles bringing the enclosed from Alexandria & presuming it was on the business he was sent about, I opened it before I discovered the mistake. Endeavor among other things you were to have enquired after, to engage me some Pompion (Pumpkin) seed. and ask if a good kind of sweet Potatoe seed can be had in case I should not be able to get enough in this part of the Country to plant an Acre of...
I have your letter of the first before me. In a late one, you have said, that application had been made to Dow, without effect, for the amount of his Bond; and therefore, Flour was sold for the use of Mr L. Washington. Does the latter mean to receive the proceeds of the flour & keep the Bond (for it was put into his hands) too? If he does not, and the Bond is returned to you; I wish Mr Lear or...
I am sorry to find by your letter of the 28th Ulto that you have had a return of your old complaint —my last caution’d you against too great exertions, & I now repeat it; because there is no occasion for it. To direct the Overseers how to apply the labour to advantage, is all that can be expected. To see to the execution, except in a ki⟨nd⟩ of rotine, is impracticable—moderate exercise will...
Your letter and report came to hand in the ordinary course of the Post. I do not recollect how I expressed myself with respect to the painting of the New room, that is whether, when speaking of this business, you would understand that it was to be done by a proper, & good painter. This was my meaning; and therefore, having no high opinion of the skill, though a favourable one of the Industry,...
The only design of this letter is to acknowledge the receipt of the letters from Mount Vernon of the 10th & 11th; and to let you or your Aunt know that the Buckles and knives mentioned in my last as having been sent, were not forwarded—I expected when I was writing those letters that Mr Porter would have been the bearer of them, but he is yet in this City. By him I mean to send the Buckles and...
In my last I acknowledged the receipt of your first letter; and I have now to do that of the 20th instt. And once for all I will desire that you will not let your anxiety to carry on my business well, or fatigue in the accomplishment of it, go too far. This would not serve me, and may injure yourself. By attempting too much you may get sick, and do nothing effectual for me or yourself. It gave...