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The City and County of New York have elected me one of their Deputies to the State Convention, which is to meet on the 17 th . instant at Poughkeepsie to consider and decide on the proposed fœderal Constitution. If it be agreeable to Congress I will attend, if not I will decline the Appointment. Permit me therefore to request their Directions on the Subject. I have the Honor to be with great...
We have now the Honor to submit to the Consideration of the United States in Congress assembled that Constitution which has appeared to us the most advisable. The Friends of our Country have long seen and desired that the Power of making War Peace and Treaties, that of levying Money & regulating Commerce and the correspondent executive and judicial Authorities should be fully and effectually...
As the State of my Health requires, and that of the Office will soon admit of my making an Excursion into the Country for ten Days or a Fortnight, I request the Permission of Congress for that Purpose. I would confine myself to a convenient Distance from the City, and in Case I should be sooner wanted, M r . Remsen would immediately give me Notice of it.—I have the Honor to be with great...
I have the Honor of transmitting to your Excellency five Petitions complaining of Actions at Law contrary as is said to the Treaty of Peace. I suspect that on examining the Records of these Actions, the Petitioners will appear to have less Cause of Complaint than seems to be the Case from their Representations.— I have the Honor to be with great Respect & Esteem, Your Excellency’s Most ob t ....
I have this Moment received an Order of Congress in the following Words viz t . “That the Secretary for foreign Affairs state to Congress without Delay any Information he may have received respecting the sentiments of the Court of France touching our Right of navigating the Mississippi, also that he state to Congress the territorial Claims of Spain on the east Side of the Mississippi.—[”]...
I find that Congress were pleased on the 22 d . Ult: to order me, “to transmit to the Executives of the States, Abstracts of the Numbers, Names and Owners of Negroes carried away by the British in contravention to the late Treaty of Peace, and which were the Property of the Citizens of such States respectively.”— I suspect that Congress were not apprized of the Length of this Account. A very...
In my Negociations with M r . Gardoqui I experience certain difficulties which in my Opinion should be so managed, as that even the Existence of them should remain a Secret for the present. I take the Liberty therefore of submitting to the Consideration of Congress whether it might not be adviseable to appoint a Committee with power to instruct and direct me on every point and Subject relative...
I have the Honor of transmitting to your Excellency herewith enclosed, a Memorial and Petition of Pierre du Calvet of Montreal and a Letter of 14 th . June last from D r . Franklin recommending him to me.— He presented to me the Account mentioned in it and the Vouchers he has to authenticate it—But as both the one and the other must be referred to the proper Department to report, I advised him...
The English Packet which arrived the Day before Yesterday, brought me no Letters from M r . Adams, which I impute to its being a Mode of Conveyance to which nothing very important can prudently be trusted.— Some private Intelligence by that Vessel, leads me to consider the Surrender of our Posts as being more problematical, than it has lately appeared to be.— I hear that the Circumstance of...
Having well considered the Nature of the proposed Negociation with the Encargodo de negocios of his Catholic Majesty, and of the Commission and Instructions which Congress has been pleased to give me on that Subject; it appears to me proper to submit the following Remarks to their Consideration.— The Commission in my Opinion is well drawn. The Instruction which restrains me from agreeing to...
On Friday last M r . DeMarbois called upon me to enquire whether Congress had as yet directed any Answers to be given to his Memorials under their Consideration. In the course of Conversation he mentioned the Affair of Longchamps and informed me that his Court would not persist in their Demand of him. He proposed that the Paper containing that Demand together with those that accompanied it...
In our last of Dec r. 15 we had the honour of communicating to Congress our letter to the Ambassador of Portugal which accompanied the draught of the treaty of Amity & Commerce proposed on our part. Since that date he addressed to us the letter N o. 1. acknowledging the receipt of ours & informing us that he had forwarded it to his court. The Baron de Thulemeier also, the Prussian Minister at...
I have received from the Chargé des Affaires of France a Letter dated the 28 th . Instant, which I herewith enclose.— He called upon me and spoke on a variety of Subjects. It appeared to me prudent to request the favor of him to reduce his Communications to writing, in a summary way. He did so, but prefered doing it in an unformal manner, and therefore did not sign it.— I think it my duty to...
It appears to me important both to Congress and their officers, that the Duties & Rights of the latter, be ascertained with Precision. Until that be done, the greatest Circumspection cannot preserve their Conduct from Error, nor their Feelings from being sometimes unintentionally hurt.— I have some Reason Sir! to apprehend, that I have come into the office of Secretary for foreign Affairs,...
I have the Satisfaction, to inform Congress that by Letters from our Bankers, in Amsterdam, I am informed, they have in Hand, near a Million of Gilders, and consequently, that the two Loans I have opened, amounting in the whole to Seven Millions of Guilders are almost full. This is full proof of the amelioration of our Credit, since January 1784, when I was obliged in a very tender State of...
[ New York, 1784 ]. In a letter beginning “Nothing could justify my repeated applications to Your Honorable body, but that rigorous lot by which I feel myself oppressed,” Hamilton set forth von Steuben’s claims to compensation by the Continental Congress. Df , in writing of H, Mr. Herbert R. Strauss, Chicago. Because von Steuben sent so many memorials to Congress, any one of which may have...
In our letter of Nov r 11 th. we had the honour of laying before Congress a state of our proceedings till that date. As from that it would appear that the last communications had in every instance passed from us to the other parties we can now only add the answers of such of them as have yet answered, & our replies; these are the courts of Portugal, Tuscany & Great Britain. N o. 1. is a copy...
Having assembled together at this place about the latter end of August we proceeded in obedience to the commands of Congress to notify our appointment and its objects to such Powers as we thought it adviseable at that time to address. We wrote a circular letter in the form N o. 1. to the Ambassadors or other Ministers residing here from the courts of Saxony; the two Sicilies, Sardinia, Venice,...
D r Franklin has lately communicated to M r Jefferson and me a Letter he has received from the Comte de Vergennes and another from M r Grand. The first informs that M r Marbois had informed him, that upon his application to the Superintendant of Finances, he had received an Answer by M r Governieur Morris, that Letters Should be written both to Amsterdam and Paris to provide for the Payment of...
The inclosed Letters from M r Dumas will communicate to Congress, the present State of affairs, between their High Mightinesses and the Government general of the Austrian Low Countries. Those, who have negotiated for the Emperor, appear to have presumed too much upon the Fears and Divisions of the Dutch, and to have compromised too hastely his Authority and Dignity. The Dutch, neither...
Having been obliged to come to Holland, the Beginning of this Year to obtain Money, to prevent M r Morriss Bills from being protested, I have remained here untill this Time, in Expectation of receiving the further Commands of Congress. From the Resolution of the 1. of May 1783 and from many private Letters, I expected that a Commission would have arrived to the late Ministers at the Peace, to...
Soon after the Signature of the Preliminary Articles of Peace, I requested, of Congress, their Permission to return to America. This Request they did not at that time judge proper to grant, me, but on the contrary resolved that a Commission should be sent to me, M r: Franklin & M r: Jay, to make a Treaty of Commerce with Great Britain. But as no such Commission has arrived in Europe, the...
If my Memory does not deceive me, I have heretofore transmitted to Congress, the Advice of some of the foreign Ministers here, that the United States in Congress assembled, Should write a Letter to each of the Sovereigns of Europe, informing them of the compleat Establishment of their Independance. Lately in seperate Conversations, with the Ministers of the two Empires, and the King of...
Some Weeks ago the Baron de Thulemeier called upon me and delivered me the Paper, copy of which is inclosed marked 1. It is a Letter written by the Envoy to the King. Last Evening the Baron called upon me again and delivered me the Answer of the King contained in the Paper Copy of which is inclosed, marked 2 I have heretofore transmitted to Congress, by different opportunities, Copies of the...
As I had the Honour to observe in a former Letter there is a Fermentation in the Courts of the two Empires and those of Bourbon, which appears in Several Particulars which may be explained hereafter. A Question of Etiquette, which amounts to no more, than which of two Persons Shall enter or leave a Room the first may Set all Europe in a Flame. The Prince de Gallitzin, the Russian Ambassador,...
Since my last Arrival in Holland, I have not transmitted to Congress, the Details of the Politicks of this Court and Nation, nor of those neighbouring Courts which are exciting disputes with it. M r Dumas has been in the Habit and Train of that History and I have not thought fit to interrupt him: But if I Should reside here regularly, the whole Business of the Mission will of Course go through...
The Measures taken by the Neighbouring Powers are likely to produce an intimate Friendship and Connection between this Republick and France. England, has mistaken her Policy So much as to delay the Signature of the definitive Treaty, and to keep up a Coldness and Distance, which instead of exciting the Populace, in favour of England as She expected has only accellerated the Union with France,...
I received Sometime Since a Letter from an American Gentleman now in London, a Candidate for Orders, desiring to know, if American Candidates might have Orders from Prostestant Bishops on the Continent, and complaining that he had been refused by the Bishop of London and the Archbishop of Canturbury, unless he would take the Oaths of Allegiance &c. Meeting Soon afterwards, the Danish Minister...
I have the Honour to inclose to Congress a Copy of a Letter from the Baron De Thulemeier, and a Copy of a Project of a Treaty transmitted to me, by the order of the King of Prussia. I Should hope it might be examined in Congress or by a Committee and that Instructions may be sent, concerning any Changes to be made in the Articles, together with a Commission to treat and conclude to Such...
I have the Honour to inclose Copies of three Notes which I have receiv’d from the Prussian Minister, the Baron de Thulemeier, by which Congress will see, that the King has agreed to take our Treaty with Sweeden for a Model, reserving to each Party the right of suggesting such alterations as shall appear to him convenient— My Request to Congress is, that they would be pleased to send...
On the Eighteenth of February the Baron de Thulemeyer, Envoy Extraordinary to their High Mightinesses from the King of Prussia, did me the Honour of a Visit, but as he found I had Company, he soon took his Leave, and as I accompanied him to the Head of the Stairs, he told me, he had Something to propose to me from the King and desired to know, when he might call again. I offered to return his...
I had Scarcely finished my Dispatches, to go by M r Thaxter with the definitive Treaty, when I was taken down with a Fever at Paris, and reduced so low as to be totally unable to attend to any Business for a long time. When I grew so much better, as to be able to ride, I was advised to go to England.— As I had nothing to do at Paris, and an Attempt to reside in Holland, would probably have...
Permit me to congratulate you, on your Election to the Chair, and to wish you and the Members of Congress in general much Satisfaction at Anapolis. on the Fifth of this Month, Cap tn Jones arrived at my Lodgings in Piccadilly, with Dispatches from the late President M r Boudinot.— The Letters addressed to “the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States” I opened, And found a Set of...
If any one should ask me what is the System of the present administration? I should answer, “to keep their places”— Every Thing they say or do appears evidently calculated to that End, and no Ideas of public Good no national Object is suffered to interfere with it. In order to drive out Shelburne, they condemned his Peace which all the Whig Part of them, would have been very glad to have made,...
About the fourteenth of September I was seized at Paris with a Fever, which proved to be a dangerous one, and brought me, very low, so that I was unable to attend to any business for some time.— on the twentieth of October, in Pursuance of the Advice of my Friends, I sett out from Auteuil a Village in the Neighbourhood of Passy for London, which City I reach’d by slow Journeys, the twenty...
I beg Leave to introduce to your Civilities M r: Thaxter, who goes home with the definitive Treaty of Peace, and the original Treaty with Holland. M r: Thaxter will present you a Medal, a Present to Congress, from the Province of Friesland, he will also present another to your Excellency of which I beg your acceptance. These were sent as Presents to me and I have no more, otherwise I should...
As I am to remain in Europe for sometime longer, I beg Leave to take a cursory view of what appears necessary or expedient to be further done in Europe, for I conceive it to be not only the Right but the Duty of a foreign Minister to advise his Sovereign according to his Lights and Judgment, although the more [extensive Information], and Superior Wisdom of the Sovereign may frequently [see]...
On the third Instant, Definitive Treaties were concluded, between all the late belligerent Powers, except the Dutch, who the Day before settled and signed Preliminary Articles of Peace with Britain. We most sincerely & cordially congratulate Congress and our Country in general, on this happy Event, and we hope that the same kind Providence which has led us thro’ a vigorous War, to an honorable...
Yesterday morning, M r. Jay informed me, that D r. Franklin had recieved, & soon afterwards the D r. put into my hands the Resolution of Congress of the first of May, ordering Commission and Instructions to be prepared to those Gentlemen and myself, for making a Treaty of Commerce with Great Britain. This Resolution, with your Excellency’s Letter, arrived very seasonably, as M r. Hartley was...
As the Resolution of Congress of the first of May, has determined it to be my Duty to remain in Europe at least another Winter I shall be obliged to say many things to your Excellency by Letter, which I hoped to have had the honour of saying upon the Floor of your house. Some of these Things may be Thought at first of little Consequence; but Time and Inquiry and Consideration will Shew them to...
On Wednesday the third day of this Month, the American Ministers met the British Minister at his Lodgings at the Hôtel de York, and signed, sealed and delivered the Definitive Treaty of Peace between the United States of America and the King of Great Britain. Altho’ it is but a Confirmation or Repetition of the Provisional Articles, I have the honor to congratulate Congress upon it, as it is a...