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    • Morris, Robert
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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Morris, Robert" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 11-20 of 24 sorted by recipient
The account we have frequently received (from one body and another) of Mrs Morris & your coming to Princeton, kept Mrs Washington & myself in continual expectation of that pleasure. A desire of having the Paymaster General present while you were here, induced his stay at this place several days longer than he intended; and when the business at the army would no longer allow his absence from...
Your favor of the 15th did not reach my hands ’till the 27th. I will delay no time in communicating the contents of Mr Constable’s letter to my brother; but as he lives at the distance of near an hundred miles from me, & out of the Post road, it may be some time before I can obtain his answer. This being the case, as it may be some disadvantage to Mr Constable to be held in suspence—& as the...
I pray you to receive my thanks for your favor of the 5th and for the obliging attention which you have given to the Flour matting from China. The latter is not yet arrived at the Port of Alexandria nor is the navigation of the River at this time open for the Passage of any Vessel—while the frost has much the appearance of encreasing and continuing. In every wish that can contribute to the...
Your very interesting Letter of the 17th Inst. with the Accounts Inclosed having been Committed to a grand Committee Consisting of a Member from each State on the floor of Congress, they have lost No time in deliberating on the Steps proper to be immediately taken by Congress for securing the Public Credit and preventing the fatal Effects that must necessarily arise from a protest for...
Letter not found: to Robert Morris, 14 Oct. 1787. On 25 Oct. Morris acknowledged “the receipt of your obliging letter of the 14th Inst.”
I will thank you for putting the letter herewith enclosed into a proper channel of conveyance. The Count de Bruhl is informed by it that my Portrait (which I have begged the Count de Solms to accept) will be forwarded to his care by you, so soon as it is finished, & I request the favor of you to do it accordingly. Mr Wright is desir’d to hand it to you for this purpose. & as he is said to be a...
Permit me to assure you in unequivocal terms, that the proposed visit of Mrs Morris, and such parts of your family as are mentioned in your letter of the 29th Ulto will give sincere pleasure at Mount Vernon—Mrs Washington and myself only wish that you had not confined it to Miss, and the two Mr Morris—of this I have taken the liberty to inform Mrs Morris in a letter; hoping that she may find...
It is always with reluctance that I trespass on the time of a person whose every moment I know to be usefully emploied. The subject however of the inclosed papers having heretofore occupied your attention and the report you made to Congress being lost so that those who have attended the present year only cannot have the benefit of your then communications, I cannot withstand the desire of...
I have been favored with your letter of the first of last month, by Doctr Gilpin & Mr Scott—Mr Colby, they informed me remained indisposed at Baltimore—It will always give me pleasure to see any Gentleman of your introduction—No apology therefore need ever accompany it. Having begun a letter to you, I will take the liberty of suggesting a matter for your consideration; which, if it strikes...
When the Men inlisted for the War were sent home on furlough, not being able to do without a small detachment of Horse, a Serjeant, Corporal and Eight of Van Heers Dragoons were prevailed on to remain a Month or two longer . They have been extremely faithfull and serviceable—but their detention being much longer than was expected and not receiving any immediate recompense for their voluntary...