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Extra[c]t of a Letter from a Gentleman in Boston of the 4th. March 1787. to R King— “—— has come back from Virginia with News that the Commissioners on the part of New York alarmed the Virginia Delegates, with an account that the Commissioners on the part of Massachusetts were for a monarchy ; & that those Delegates wrote their Legislature of it, who shut their Galaries and made a most serious...
[ Paris, 4 July 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “Madison, Monroe & Hardy. Letters of recommendation for W. T. Franklin.” None of these letters has been found; but see TJ to Monroe, 5 July 1785 .]
The bearer hereof, Mr. Franklin , being about to return to America, I take the liberty of presenting him to your acquaintance. Your esteem for the character of his grandfather would have procured him a favourable reception with you: and it cannot but increase your desire to know him, when you shall be assured that his worth and qualifications give him a personal claim to it. I have taken the...
My last was of June 20. Your’s received since that date are May 15. and June 6. In mine I acknoleged the receipt of the Paccan nuts which came sealed up. I have reason to believe those in the box are arrived at Lorient. By the Mary Capt. Howland lately sailed from Havre to N. York I shipped three boxes of books one marked I.M. for yourself, one marked B.F. for Doctr. Franklin, and one marked...
Letter not found. Ca. 3 June 1788 . Mentioned in Brown to JM, 7 June 1788 . Encloses resolution of Congress concerning the independence of Kentucky.
This letr. is written purposely to inform you of the project mentioned to you in New york concerning the land at the Great falls. The quantity is 500 acres, the price may be called 4,000£ with the incumbrance of an annual rent of 150£ sterling. The advantages infinitely exceed that of any spot of ground in the U. States. The canal runs thro the land, & the bason is in the land, the situation...
Being cut off from the occurrences in the Assembly I have nothing to write you upon, but the prospect as to my reelection. The Apostacy of one of our Delegates in the Convention, and the wavering conduct of the other, have re-animated the Spirit of Anti-federalism in the County to such a degree that much work is to be done before my object will be secured —the issue of the ten days for which...
I recd. your letter acknowleging the rect. of the three papers in the Gazetteer. At the request of Mr. Wilson, Dr. Rush and another friend or two I added a 4th. paper, calculated to shew the general advantages & obviate some of the Objections to the System. It was desired by these Gentlemen for the purpose of inserting in one of several handbills, which it was proposed to circulate thro our...
… [France has ordered] two large Armies to get in readiness … in Flanders and … in Alsace.… I hope matters will be compromised and a War avoided…. Your Ministers will write you more than I can respecting their negotiations…. Our friend Mr. jefferson has been unwell but now feels better…. Remember me to the Governor and all friends in Virginia.… Printed extract (Charles Hamilton Catalogue No....
Your favor of the 23d. has been just put into my hands. The accounts you give me of Culpeper are more flattering than I expected. Both Early and Strother will do every thing in their power. The first of them was detected in an absolute falsehood respecting you by Mr. Gordon in Richmond and that Gentn. had certificates with him to prove it when he was taken ill. Delicacy is out of the question...
I thank you for the perusal of the enclosed reports—Mr Jay seems to have laboured the point respecting the Convention. If any thing should occur that is interesting, & your leizure will permit it, I should be glad to hear from you on the subject. Printed copy (Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 686, 1892). Letter and enclosures not found. Listed in DLC : Madison Miscellany. JM appears either to...
I thank you for your letter of the 30th Ult. It came by the last Post. I am better pleased that the proceedings of the Convention is handed from Congress by a unanimous vote (feeble as it is) than if it had appeared under stronger marks of approbation without it. This apparent unanimity will have its effect. Not every one has opportunities to peep behind the curtain; and as the multitude often...
I arriv’d here a few days since to press on the legislature of this State a seperation of the impost from the supplel: funds. I have the most satisfactory evidence they will reject the proposition. We proceed therefore further merely to discharge our duty. Both parties are united in opposition to it. To morrow we shall be recd. by the legislature. I am sorry I came on the business. Before this...
The Commissioners appointed to liquidate the claim of this state against the United States on Acct. of the Ceded Territory were by some very animated resolutions of our house yesterday stopped from further proceeding in the business untill a remonstrance had been presented to Congress. This will no doubt be officially transmitted to you in a few days. The construction of the Words, “all...
Letter not found. February 1785, Williamsburg . This letter informed JM that the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws had been conferred upon him by “the University of William & Mary.” See JM to Wythe, 15 April 1785 .
The arrangment in our foreign affairs begins at length to assume some form. Upon whatever ground they were taken up for a considerable time, either with respect to France, Spn. or G. B., the same difficulties arose. If it was mov’d that Dr. Franklin be permitted agreeable to his request to retire home it was firmly oppos’d by R. Island [&] Massachussetts . If that a minister be appointed to...
I find by yrs. of the 18th. Novr. that one of my letters prior in date to the One of the 2d. Novr. has miscaried. This Gives me some uneasiness on account of its contents which possibly may transpire. An Absence of ten days prevented my writing last week. The legislature have taken up the subject of British debts and after four days debate on the subject passed a Vote for the payment of them...
I thank you for your favor of the 10th. inst. from Orange. Colo. Nicholas in a late letter to me seems to think, that the majority is decidedly for the constitution. Accuracy cannot be expected; but a comparison of the intelligence, which centers here from the various parts of Va., persuades me, that he at least mistakes the degree of the majority, and leads me to suspect, that it lies adverse...
After a very long silence, I am at length able to write to you. An unlucky dislocation of my right wrist has disabled me from using my pen for three months. I now begin to use it a little, but with great pain; so that this letter must be taken up at such intervals as the state of my hand will permit, & will probably be the work of some days. Tho’ the joint seems to be well set, the swelling...
Having a few moments only to devote, you must be satisfied with a very laconic letr. Such is my distance from the line of posts, that to use it, I must avail myself of accidental conveyances, which are often like the present, sudden. It is with real Grief I inform you that by a late vote of the assembly of Virga. on a collateral question, they have manifested hostility to the new constitution....
In mine of Nov. 11. I acknoleged the receipt of yours of Aug. 20. Sep. 7. & 15. Since that, the one of Oct. 11. by the packet has come to hand as also that of July 3. by mr Short who came in the packet, was actually in N. York when you passed through it & had waited there several days in hopes of seeing you. I thank you very much for the relation of the proceedings of assembly. It is the most...
After the notification of my disgrace which reached me about the 20th. Novr. I hastened from N York & pressed forward to my home. Every difficulty of weather and roads opposed my progress and retarded us effectually, for it took us three weeks to reach this place which I had reckoned on accomplishing in twelve days. At Length we arrived on the banks of potomac, and thro our avidity to embrace...
Seven o’clock, and retired to my fireside, I have determined to enter into conversation with you; this is a village of about 5000 inhabitants, when the court is not here and 20,000 when they are, occupying a valley thro’ which runs a brook, and on each side of it a ridge of small mountains most of which are naked rock. The king comes here, in the fall always, to hunt. His court attend him, as...
I have recd. your favor of the 9th. inclosing a paper from Mr. Triplet. The case is stated so imperfectly that it is impossible for me to take any step for bringing it before Congress, if that should be proper. Mr. R. Morris I am told will be here soon, and I shall endeavour then to supply the omitted circumstances. In the meantime Mr. Triplet may either make out a fuller statement & forward...
I did not learn till just now that you lodged in Town last night or I should have taken the liberty to have requested you to have called down, My brothers indisposition confining me almost entirely to his bed chambre. Col. Ballard formerly of your State is desirous of seeing you. He will have some business with Congress in which your good opinion may be of infinite service to him. He is...
My Friend Mr. Thomas Pleasants read to me a Paragraph in a letter he wrote you, recommending me, shoud the New Government be adopted & consequent commercial arrangements take place, as a Candidate for the Consulship to the Kingdom of Portugal, at same time solliciting your interest wth. General Washington in my behalf; he also shewd me your answer. A Severe & tedious indisposition prevented me...
Letter not found. 11 November 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter to Lee of 23 November 1786 . Concerned Lee’s sense of injury at being dropped by the Virginia legislature from the state delegation to Congress, and the “deriliction of the friendship” between JM and Lee because of JM’s being elected, so Lee thought, in his place ( Lee to JM, 20 Dec. 1786 ).
Never was there an Assembly in this State in possession of greater ability & information than the present Convention—yet I am in doubt whether they will approve the Constitution. There is unhappily three parties opposed to it. First all Men who are in favour of paper money and tender Laws—those are more or less in every part of the State. Secondly all the late Insurgents and their abettors; &...
Letter not found. 19 November 1786. The calendar of Pendleton’s letters (DLC: Madison Miscellany) apparently prepared by a clerk for Peter Force around 1850 cites this letter. The annotations indicate the one-page letter included comments on the attempted reform of the county court system and “Congratulations on reappointment to Congress.” Enclosed was a draft of a bill for amending the county...
I am much obliged to you for your communication of the proceedings of the Convention, since I left them; for I feel that anxiety about the result, which it’s Importance must give to every honest citizen. If I thought that my return could contribute in the smallest degree to it’s Improvement, nothing should keep me away. But as I know that the talents, knowledge, & well-establish’d character,...
Letter not found. 29 January 1788, Edmundsbury. On the docket of JM to Pendleton, 28 Oct. 1787 , Pendleton noted: “Answd. Jan. 29—88.” Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 21 Feb. 1788 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) also indicates that Pendleton wrote a two-page letter to JM from Edmundsbury on this day. The summary reads: “The reception of the proposed...
No question has been yet taken by which the strength of parties can be determined. The calculations on different sides do not accord; each making them under the bias of their particular wishes. I think however the friends of the Constitution are most confident of superiority; and am inclined myself to think they have at this time the advantage of 3 or 4 or possibly more in point of number. The...
I have recieved your favor of the 29. May acknowledging the receipt of my first letter, though making no mention of the last, which I presume has not yet come to hand. Since the date thereof the affair of the treaty with the Western Indians which was decided on the 18th. March last, has been opened again & very much canvassed; the result however is that the treaty is to be held; & for the...
Letter not found. 28 April 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter to Monroe, 13 May 1786 , and Monroe’s letter to JM, 18 May 1786 . Related to the speculation in which Monroe purchased land in the Mohawk Valley for JM and himself. Monroe expressed an interest in taking a journey with JM to see the lands, and discussed odd appearance of two conventions sitting simultaneously with similar powers to...
I enclose a copy of the journals so far as they are printed. They contain nothing you will find respecting the requisition nor the commercial interests of the Union. The former upon the report of a committee hath been frequently before Congress of late and as often recommitted, in which state it now lies. As the principal part of the debt which in other States forms a part of the present...
Yesterday, My Dear Sir, The Convention made a house. That day and this have been spent in preliminary arrangements. Tomorrow we go into a Committee of the whole on the Constitution. There is every appearance that a full discussion will take place, which will keep us together at least a fortnight. It is not easy to conjecture what will be the result. Our adversaries greatly outnumber us. The...
Mr. Henry has this Day brought in his firebrand which I fear we can scarcely withstand. Tomorrow— tis a fearfull day . Corbin has today almost given up the cause of federalism. Richd Bland Lee—Mr. Z. Johnson & myself—opposed to the formidable band of Antifederals who were most conspicuous in the Convention. “Whereas (say the Resolutions) the Convention of Delegates of the People of Virginia...
I was honord a few days ago by your favor of the 27th. May for which accept my thanks. It gives me no small concern to find that the People of Kentucky are not to expect your Assistance in the important Business of framing a Constitution which they have so shortly in View. At the time I took the liberty to trouble you with the request I was well aware of the multiplicity of your engagements,...
On my way to this place I met a Man from the Settlement on Cumberland River in North Carolina who had just come in by the way of Kentuckey. He informs that the minds of all the Western People are agitated on Account of the proposed cession of the Mississippi Navigation to Spain. Every person talks of it with i[n]d[i]gnation and reprobates it as a Measure of the greatest Injustice and Despotism...
Your favor of the 9th. reach’d me a few days since. Mine by the last post advis’d you of my arrival here; still I am with out a colleague and the representation of the States, the same. I am perfectly satisfied that the more fully the subject is investigated, and the better the interests of the States severally are understood, the more obvious will appear the necessity of commiting to the U S....
Whenever I ask your aid to the promotion of the wishes of my friend, receive it on this express condition, that the public good must combine with the views of the gentlemen recommended. Very happy in the appointent [ sic ] of my old fellow soldier Lindsay to the vacancy occasioned by Mr. Parkers election, I desire only to entreat your attention to his compeer Mr. M. Livingston, should it be...
As you will be on the ground or convenient to it for negotiating further engagments on the Mohawk as well as concluding that we have already enter’d into, I commit to you the papers respecting it. You will take such steps as you find necessary in both instances. We hope to see you if convenient on your way to N. York. Let me hear from you in the mean time whilst you remain where you are....
I should not have availed my self of yr. kind Indulgence, called a Stipulation, but sooner acknowledged the rect. of yr. favr. of Feby. 24th., had not the March Winds disorde[re]d my crazy Constitution, & rendered writing rather disagreable. I was made happy in finding that the Main body of the Eastern Insurgents were dispersed, had repented & were restored to the body of Orderly Citizens. I...
I wrote to you by the last post since which nothing material has turned up here. We are debating on amendments without having decided what is to be done with them. There is so great a diversity in the views of our opponents that it is impossible to predict any thing. Upon the whole however our fears diminish. Yrs Affecty I take the liberty for certain reasons to put the inclosed under cover to...
I have been here about a Fortnight during which time we have not made a Congress. So. Carolina, Virga, Pennsa, N. Jersey, & Massachussets are represented. There is one Member from each of the States of Rhode Island, N. Carolina & Georgia, but none from New Hampshire, Connecticut N. York, Delaware or Maryland. I very much wish we may make a house in a week or ten days, as I think the...
I wrote you last on the 12th. of Jan. since which I have received yours of Octob. 17. Dec. 8. and 12. That of Oct. 17. came to hand only Feb. 23. How it happened to be four months on the way, I cannot tell, as I never knew by what hand it came. Looking over my letter of Jan. 12th. I remark an error of the word ‘probable’ instead of ‘improbable,’ which doubtless however you had been able to...
Letter not found. 28 April 1787. Mentioned in JM’s letter of 13 June 1787 to Ambrose Madison (MH). Concerned information regarding the illness of James Madison, Sr., and the results of the spring election.
I have the honor to inclose you a large Bundle of Papers sent to my Care by his Excellency Thoms Jefferson Ambassador of the US at the Court of Versailles to be Forwarded to you. I comply with a very great pleasure with his Excellency’s orders, Since it procures me the opportunity to assure you that I have the honor to be with the highest regard Most Honored Sir Your most obedt Hble Servt I...
I have your favor of the 24. which pursuing me by a circuitous route, did not reach this untill within a few days. I place value on every mark of your friendship & to convince you that public business alone was not what induc’d me to revive impressions which were strongly imprinted on my breast. I now write you from a recess, where news of private happiness can be the only subject of...
Was I to found my Hopes Upon the Letters I have from Congress, I would please my fancy with the Expectation of Wellcoming You to the European Shore—and Yet, when I Remember Your obstinate plans of life, I am affraid least my Warm Wishes Should be disappointed—in the Mean While, I will Continue writing, and By the Way Will advise You to send Your Answers By the packets Rather than By a private...