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§ From George Washington. Ca. 1789–1796. Three notes requesting consultation with JM on unspecified matters: “Thursday, 9 oclk. “If you could make it convenient to call here before you go to the House, you would oblige me. I want to have some conversation with you on two or three matters. Yrs Affectly.” “Sunday ½ past 7 oclk. “If you have leisure to give the enclosed a reading, and me an...
Letter not found. 29 April 1789. Calendared in the lists probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany). The two-page letter was offered for sale in the Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 (1892), which listed items from the McGuire collection of JM’s papers.
I am anxious, My dear Sir, to renew our long interrupted correspondence, but the terms will be so unequal, that I am almost ashamed to propose it. My private & retired situation will furnish but few incidents of Information or amusement. I will however, from time to time communicate what ever I may be able to collect worthy of your notice. As I am near the centre of your district, & possibly...
I was favord with yours upon my return a few days since from the districts of Staunton & Charlotte ville—which will apologize for your not hearing from me sooner. The Judges, Mrs. Monroe and our child were of the party, so that you will readily suppose there was some variety in the entertainment. The arrangment of the business of the genl. court, into the districts, having not been...
I will make no Apology to you for the small Portion of Time that the Perusal of this letter may claim from more valuable Avocations. By Letters I have received from Europe, I am induced to think that Strong Impressions on the public Mind, will be made by the first legislative Acts of Congress, which will display in Some Measure, the Character of our new Government. I am afraid we Shall be...
I had the pleasure of writing to you in last Month by Colo. Wm Heth. This you will receive by Mr William Vannerson, who hath for some time been engaged by Mr Ross, and myself in the settlement of our affairs; and now visits New-York upon business with Mr William Hunter jr of Alexandria, Who hath been for some time past in that City: it is of importance to us, and as Mr Hunter is well known,...
I was this morning favored with yours of the 12th. instant, as I had been many weeks before with your other from Alexa. I did not recollect, that I had omitted to acknowledge the receipt of the latter until you expressed a doubt of its miscarriage. I confess, it strikes me, as expedient, that a temporary arrangement of impost should be made. The merchants, (I am told and I believe with truth)...
However improper it may be to interrupt the attention which may be devoted to more important concerns; you will not, I am pursuaded, be less disposed to indulge a solicitation which can only proceed from my wishes to serve the interests of a friend, so far as they are found not incompatible with those of the community. Mrs. Grace Bowdoin, the present proprietor of the ferry from this shore to...
This Letter will I expect be presented to you by my Brother in Law Mr. James B. Nickolls of Portsmouth in Virginia who goes to New york with a view of solliciting the appointment of Collector of Customs at Norfolk in the State of Virginia. He is a very worthy Amiable Young man perfectly well qualified for the office in every respect, and as such I can freely recommend him, appealing also in...
Having for some time felt a great deal of anxiety about the consequences to the United States, which appear likely to rise out of the Affairs of the Western Country I have turned my attention a good deal to considering that Subject, and as I know you also have had a very great solicitude about it I shall trouble you with such thoughts or facts relating to it as I think may possibly be of use....
I must beg you to excuse my freedoms: it is with a good intention that I am led to mention that the idea of 6 Cents pr Gallon on Mollasses excites a considerable degree of uneasiness here—not that any objcect [ sic ] to that duty on what is consumed in the Country—but only as it will injure the distillery & consequently the Fishery. The answer that a suitable draw back upon Rum will be...
I have recived your two favors with their respective Inclosures, which have been forwarded. I am happy to hear you are so near being prepared to proceed to business under the new System & I will be much obliged to you to inform me when you expect any thing will be done with respect to the General Impost, and whether or not, you suppose the Interest on Final Settlement Certificates will be...
I make no excuse for sending you at present the Work of Mr Le Trosne because from your conversation I think you have not seen it, that I conceive it will interest you, & that when I arrive at New York I shall myself stand in need of it. The whole of the work is worthy your perusal, tho’ my view is only to communicate the Treatise de l’Interest Social which is the most regular & complete work I...
I congratulate you upon the success of that inestimable Constitution which I had the honor to witness your support and approbation of; and it is with pleasure I find you are entitled to a share in the deliberations consequent of it’s adoption. I take the liberty, Sir, to solicit the favor of your interest to the appointment of a Collector of Duties and Imposts; this being the only Commercial...
Your election to a seat in the new Goverment I think you can entertain no doubt was pleasing to me. I sincerly hope your attendance will be as pleasant to yourself as beneficial to your Country. It is suggested here that you intend to pass a short Resolve requesting the several States to collect a Revenue for you intill you can have time to digest & prepare a system. Suffer me to suggest for...
I was a few days ago favored with your very freindly and polite letter of the 19th. Ult. by Mr. Donaldson. Accept my thanks for the terms in which you acknowledge the Rect. of mine of the 20th. of February. Assure yourself that I have long had a due sense of the favorable sentiments you are pleased to entertain of me, and that they are contemplated with the greater satisfaction, as they are...
May I be permited My Good Sir, to Ask Your Friendly Aid on the Subject of Colo Lees Letter, which I here take the liberty to Inclose; & which Letter, I did intend to have don My Self, the Honor to deliver but that A trip to N York, will be attended with considerable Expence; & unless I can Meet with Some incouragement from you, & the Other Genttlemen I have taken the liberty to write to, I had...
I took the liberty some days ago to address a letter to you, relative to an Appointmt. that I wish to Solicit under the Federal Government. I then Observed that I shoud forward the best recommendations that I coud procure, for that Purpose. I now inclose such recommendations as I have procured & beg leave to request your Attention thereto. As I am unacquainted with the nature of making such...
Having been the Loan Officer of the United States in the State of Virginia since the Year 1780, and by a subsequent arrangment of Congress also the Receiver of Continental Taxes within the State, since the Year 1785, my views and habits have been formed on the expectation of holding the Office, so long as it may be necessary to the public interest to Continue it, & so long as my Conduct shall...
Whenever I ask your aid to the promotion of the wishes of my friend, receive it on this express condition, that the public good must combine with the views of the gentlemen recommended. Very happy in the appointent [ sic ] of my old fellow soldier Lindsay to the vacancy occasioned by Mr. Parkers election, I desire only to entreat your attention to his compeer Mr. M. Livingston, should it be...
Will you Pardon my interrupting for a moment your Attention to the great subjects before you, to ask you how you do, whethr. your Legislative body is Organized, the President & V. P. in Office, and the general complexion of yr. Members? You know how much I esteem yr. Correspondence, & my earnest appetite for News; as I do your kind inclination to gratify me, but I must repeat my Caveat agt....
I am very much at a loss how to address you on the subject, which has induced me to trouble you with this letter. It would have the complexion to most men of mere private gratification and advantage. I could not therefore touch the matter to you had I not pursued in my former correspondence only Objects connected with political truth and the public interests. Omitting therefore any further...
By Col. Davies who has the superintendance of the business committed to Mr. Dunscombe I send you twenty one pounds 7/. which is all I can at this time spare the remainder shall not be long delayed, as I have a little Tobacco that will I expect soon bring me a better price than is now going and in the hope of its doing so I have yet avoided selling it. The price for Tobacco here is now only 19...
Presuming on our ancient acquaintance I take the liberty of solliciting your attention to an affair of mine that is now before your Honorable House. One of the elected federal representatives of this State is, in my opinion, ineligible. The case is in short thus: the Gentleman alluded to left Carolina in the year 1770 his parents died about the same time and he was absent from America during...
Haveing had the honor of being Known to and treated with the politest Attention by you and conscious of haveing done nothing to obliterate your good Opinion, I boldly venture to address you in the familiar Style of a Friend. The Supreme Executive Councill of Pensylvania are on the Brink of appointing me naval Officer in this City, with the express View of recomending for and getting me...
I flatter myself you will excuse the freedom I take in requesting your Patronage before the Congress of the united States respecting my claims to the Invention of Steam-boats, as far as you shall deem me worthy, when you consider that through that honorable Body only I can receive an exclusive Right or Title to the Enjoyment of my Labor, and that in whatever manner I may profit by the project,...
I have been favored with your Letter of the 19th by which it appears that a quoram of Congress was hardly to be expected until the beginning of the past week. As this delay must be very irksome to the attending members, and every days continuance of it (before the Government is in operation) will be more sensibly felt, I am resolved, no interruption shall proceed from me that can well be...
Ever since the second day of February I have been confined with excrutiating Gout—and to this moment altho I am nearly recover’d since my first attack I have never partaken of a morsel at any Table but my own. This with my retired situation—which prevents easy Access to post offices—and affords little worth communicating—will account for my silence hitherto—for I assure you my wishes for your...
I have been favored with your Letter of the 19th.; by which it appears that a quoram of Congress was hardly to be expected until the beginning of the past week. As this delay must be very irksome to the attending Members, and every days continuance of it (before the Government is in operation) will be more sensibly felt; I am resolved, no interruption shall proceed from me that can well be...
It is not often I am deficient in Attention to my friends, particularly those whose friendship I think worth cultivating—but I will confess that to you I have been almost inexcusably & to myself unaccountably inattentive. There are however some excuses to be made for me. I have not been sure of ever finding you either in New York Philadelphia or in Virginia—for being in Congress, in our...
Colo. Griffin having announced to me, that you were safely lodged within the fœderal precincts, I shall renew the assault of my uninteresting correspondence. There is a general calm of politicks. The discontented themselves seem willing to wait with temper, until congress shall open their views. It gave me much pleasure, to read your letter to Colo. T. M. Randolph; as it shews a consciousness...
The bearer Mr Jno. Churchman believes he has made a discovery of some consequence for readily ascertaining the longitude. He wishes his principles to be examined by capable mathematicians in the vicinity, &, if possible, under the direction of Congress. If they should prove as valuable as he supposes, I shall be happy that rude genius in our countryman may meet with proper encouragement. Dr...
I wrote you a few lines some days ago, which I hope you have received. The letter contained Col. Morgan’s propositions to our farmers & tradesmen. On sunday last I sat down to make a few notes on some points which appear necessary to be considered in forming our System of impost. Enclosed you will find a copy of them hastily transcribed, of which you will make any use you see proper. Some of...
Your favors of the 5th & 8th came duly to hand; the first from Baltimore, the latter from Philda. The design of this is merely to acknowledge the receipt of them, and to forward the enclosed; but I will add, as I have my pen in my hand, that Col. Bland, after having lain a weak with the Gent. at Gunston, after having been shipwrecked & land-wrecked, mired, fatigued with walking, &C. &C....
You will be surpris’d at the receipt of a letter from me dated at Philadelphia on the 22d March. I have been detaind here much Longer than I expected, but shall set out on wednesday. I trust I need not apologize to you for mentioning that, if in the general arraignment, there shoud be any office, worthy my attention, and the duties of which you think me adequate to, you will have my name...
Your favors of the 5th. & 8th. came duly to hand; the first from Baltimore, the latter from Philda. The design of this is merely to acknowledge the receipt of them, and to forward the enclosed; but I will add, as I have my pen in my hand, that Col. Bland, after having lain a week with the Gent at Gunston, after having been shipwrecked & land-wrecked, mired, fatigued with walking, &c. &c....
When you were in this town I took the liberty of mentioning to you that I expected a bill from Mr. Ambler, which I thought might be forwarded to New York. This bill has not come to hand and my finances being rather low I have taken the liberty of drawing on you in favour of Colo Coles for seven Guineas; a liberty which I hope you will excuse, and may be assurd that I will forward a bill on New...
Not having the pleasure of seeing you at your Election in Spotsylvania, have taken the freedom to address you by Letter altho an intire strainger, to beg your advice or rather information, respecting the Redemption of the Continental Currency that is still remaining in the hands of sundrie persons, particularly in this State, I having a considerable quantity, that I did not fund, agreeable to...
I have this afternoon obtained from a friend of Col. Geo. Morgan a copy of his handbill which was put into the hands of confidential people in N. Jersey & Pennsylvania for the purpose of procuring followers. I know your solicitude about the western Country, and have therefore enclosed you a copy, which after you have done with it be pleased to give to Mr. Jay when you have an opty. I am this...
A very long acquaintance with Col. Saml. Hanson, who will have the honor to deliver you this letter, and the respectability and number of testimonials of his merits, which he carries with him to New York have induced me to trespass on your friendship. He goes as a candidate for some public employment for which his talents may be thought equal, and I wish to give him a chance of your support....
It is a duty I owe myself to give you a summary of my pretensions to the public favor; & relying upon your candour shall make no apology for the trouble. In the begining of the opposition to British despotism my family & connexions took such a decided part, that I was held a prisoner by General Gage for some time after my fellow citizens were liberated. As soon as I could escape I chearfully...
I beleive you were a member of our Assembly some years agoe when their was a notion of making new regulations in the Customs of the State, if so, expect you were acquainted with my intention then of offering for an appointment in that Line. As I expect new arrangments will now take place under the Federal Government, have taken the Liberty to solicit the President and the Senators from this...
I wrote you last on the 12th. of Jan. since which I have received your’s of Octob. 17. Dec. 8. & 12. That of Oct. 17. came to hand only Feb. 23. How it happened to be four months on the way, I cannot tell, as I never knew by what hand it came. Looking over my letter of Jan. 12th. I remark an error of the word ‘probable’ instead of ‘improbable,’ which doubtless however you had been able to...
I am induced to think that a Commissary of Military Stores will be one of the first Appointments that Congress will make under the new Government, I therefore take the Liberty of writing to you on the Subject, & inclosing some Other letters to your care, you being the representative of the district in which I live. I leave open the letters for your examination, which after readg. be pleased to...
I wrote you last on the 12th. of Jan. since which I have received yours of Octob. 17. Dec. 8. and 12. That of Oct. 17. came to hand only Feb. 23. How it happened to be four months on the way, I cannot tell, as I never knew by what hand it came. Looking over my letter of Jan. 12th. I remark an error of the word ‘probable’ instead of ‘improbable,’ which doubtless however you had been able to...
Some difficulties having occurred in the settlement of the Accounts of this state with the United States between the agents of the two parties; the Executive have thought it proper to send forward Colonel Davies immediately to the seat of the fœderal government there to represent the particular situation of this business. He is instructed in all cases of difficulty to confer with you. Permit...
Tomorrow I go from hence, Mrs. Lee as when you left her. If I forgot to fill up the power of attorney, please to insert Mr Jeffersons name. Yesterday the original papers went off in the Maryland bound to Bordeaux to the care of Mr. Mason Merchant there—I am told in three or four days the mail reaches Versailles from that port. Many applicants above & here, on each side of the river have waited...
In appealing to your Candor I feel a confidence that no apology will be necessary for the present mode of address. Before I left Virginia I communicated to my good friend Mr: Randolph, the reasons that induced me to become a Candidate for the appointment of Clerk to the House of Representatives of the United States, and for that purpose to relinquish the public situation in which I stood...
The post at the point of fork it is supposed will be sold to the continent by this state as a place of arms. The charge of it, the victualling the men necessary to keep the arms in proper order, should such an event take place, would be an object of attention to me; & as it is convenient, in point [of] situation, should be glad of the appointment. The gentleman who holds it, under the state, I...
The papers necessary to our European project are enclosed herewith—viz my power of attorney, your remarks which are so full that I can add nothing, the old plot of the canal which must be kept by you, and a copy sent, it being not fit—& my letr. to Mr. Jefferson. The last explains fully the manner which appeared to be best for us to embrace, but should any thing be improper, you can pass it...