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I am much obliged to you for your kind Letter of the 2 d. of November, and hope that a Correspondence So agreably begun may be prosecuted, to the Benefit of the Country We have the Honour to serve. Although I may be not personally known to you, the Character uniformly given of your Talents, Application, and publick Spirit, leave me no room to doubt, that I Shall derive much necessary...
I am much obliged to you for your kind Letter of the 2 d. of November, and hope that a Correspondence So agreably begun may be prosecuted, to the Benefit of the Country We have the Honour to serve. Although I may be not personally known to you, the Character uniformly given of your Talents, Application, and publick Spirit, leave me no room to doubt, that I Shall derive much necessary...
In Consequence of a Letter from Lt. Governor Cushing I have caused the Records to be searched and have found the inclosed Copy of one of the Instruments desired. the other cannot be found as yet. The Expence is fifteen Guineas, which the Gentlemen will be so good as to pay to the Hon. Cotton Tufts, for me, whose Rect Shall be a discharge. With great Respect, I / have the Honour to be, sir your...
Yesterday I was honoured with your Letters of the 4. and 10. Dec r. — The Act of Congress respecting the British Consul General, is wise, and well guarded: Nevertheless I think that We Should not be So inattentive to Ettiquette, as to omit a Proposition for Sending a Minister Plenipotentiary. We give up, a Point, by receiving a Consul in return for a Minister, which, although it may appear of...
Yesterday I was honoured with your Letters of the 4. and 10. Dec r. — — — The Act of Congress respecting the British Consul General, is wise, and well guarded: Nevertheless I think that We Should not be So inattentive to Ettiquette, as to omit a Proposition for sending a Minister Plenipotentiary. We give up, a Point, by receiving a Consul in return for a Minister, which, although it may appear...
I have inclosed to M r Ramsay an Address to the landed trading and funded Interests of England, which contains Some good Sense, intermixed here and there with a little Folly. M r. Ramsay will be so good as to let you read it and in return you may let him read the inclosed Principle of the Commutation Act. As the Commerce of the United States begins to run to the East Indies, every Thing which...
I have inclosed to Mr Ramsay an Address to the landed trading and funded Interests of England, which contains Some good Sense, intermixed here and there with a little Folly. Mr Ramsay will be so good as to let you read it and in return you may let him read the inclosed Principle of the Commutation Act. As the Commerce of the United States begins to run to the East Indies, every Thing which may...
Yesterday, arrived by the Post your Favours of the 2. 4. & 5. of May. Every Day will furnish America with fresh Proofs, of the fallacious nature of all her hopes of Prosperity, Grandeur and Glory, from the friendly disposition of foreign Powers. Whatever Assistance she may ever derive from any of them, must be purchased at a greater Price than it will be worth. Reverence thyself, is a Prœcept...
I had heard Sometime ago, of your Marriage with the amiable Daughter of my old Friend, M r Alsop, as well as of that of M r Gerry, and of both with the more Pleasure, probably as a good Work of the Same kind, for connecting Massachusetts and New York in the Bands of Love was going on here. Last Sunday under the Right Reverend Sanction of the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of st Asaph...
Yesterday, arrived by the Post your Favours of the 2. 4. & 5. of May. “Every Day will furnish America with fresh Proofs, of the fallacious nature of all her hopes of Prosperity, Grandeur and Glory, from the friendly disposition of foreign Powers. Whatever assistance she may ever derive from any of them, must be purchased at a greater Price than it will be worth. Reverence thyself, is a Precept...
I had heard Sometime ago, of your Marriage with the amiable Daughter of my old Friend, M r Alsop, as well as of that of Mr Gerry, and of both with the more Pleasure, probabaly as a good Work of the Same kind, for connecting Massachusetts and New York in the Bands of Love was going on here. Last Sunday under the Right Reverend Sanction of the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of St Asaph...
Give me leave to introduce to you Colonel Forrest, who lost a Limb at the Battle of Germantown—he has been Some years in Business here, & has an Universal good Character— Your
The tumultuous Conduct of many People in New England which is mentioned in your obliging Letter of the 3 d of October, does not I hope arise from any Competitions for the Government. If the People who wish for Hancock, or those who prefer Bowdoin, those who vote for Sullivan—or such as desire Langden, are Capable of exciting such kinds of Discontent, and Convulsions in order to keep out—or to...
The tumultuous Conduct of many People in New England which is mentioned in your obliging Letter of the 3 d of October, does not I hope arise from any Competitions for the Government. If the People who wish for Hancock, or those who prefer Bowdoin, those who vote for Sullivan—or such as desire Langden, are Capable of exciting such kinds of Unhappiness Discontent, and Convulsions in order to...
Mr. M & Mr Grayson present their complts to Mr. King and beg leave to inform him that the doors of the Assembly were shut on a letter from Col Carrington & Col. Lee, which Mr. Grayson saw but did not sign for reasons irrelative to the present subject. Mr. M. was in the Legislature at the time and knows the cause was very different from the one mentioned to Mr. King. Both of them are satisfied...
Mr. Francis Upton, a Gentleman recommended to me by Mr: Hartley, will have the Honour to deliver you this Letter. He goes to New York, about an Estate Claimed by him, his Brother & Sister. I beg Leave to introduce him to you— This Country affords nothing new—an obstinate continuation of the same Ministry, the same Principles Spirit, Passions, Prejudices, and in one word system is no News,—I...
Since my arrival here, I have written to my colleagues, informing them, that if either of them would come down I would accompany him to Philadelphia. So much for the sake of propriety and public opinion. In the mean time if any material alteration should happen to be made in the plan now before the Convention, I will be obliged to you for a communication of it. I will also be obliged to you to...
I wrote to you some days since, that to request you to inform me when there was a prospect of your finishing as I intended to be with you, for certain reasons, before the conclusion. It is whispered here that some late changes in your scheme have taken place which give it a higher tone. Is this the case? I leave town today, to attend a circuit in a neighbouring County, from which I shall...
I have this instant recd. your favr. of the 16. and have but a few moments to thank you for it. I have also just recd. a letter from Genl. Washington. It contains nothing very material or new. The Genl. thinks that although there is an uncertainty in the case, the final decision will prove that a large majority in Virga. are in favor of the Constitution. If nine States should precede it seems...
I have received the letter with which you were pleased to honor me from Boston, and pray you to accept my thanks for, & congratulations on, the important information it contains. Happy, am I, to see the favorable decision of your Convention upon the proposed Government; not only on acct of its adding an important State to the number of those which have already accepted it, but because it must...
I thank you sincerely for your favor previous to your leaving N. York. The information in it is agreeable an[d] useful. Our Convention met on Monday. I did not arr[ive] till the evening of that day. Mr. Pendleton had been unanimously put into the chair. The debates commenced to day. The Govr. has declared the day of previous amendments past, and thrown himself fully into our scale. M—s—n &...
I have been for two days & still am laid up with a bilious attack. Writing is scarcely practicable & very injurious to me. I can only say to you therefore appearances have not changed sensibly since my last. I think we have a majority as yet; but the other party are ingenious & indefatigable. I wish you all happiness & am Yrs. RC ( NHi ). Addressed in an unidentified hand. Docketed by King.
I am tolerably well over the bilious indisposition which confined me at the date of my last. The progress of the Convention is extremely slow; though from the impatience of the members, I think the Session will not be long. The issue of it is more doubtful than was apprehended when I last wrote. The ostensible points of opposition are direct taxation, the imperfect representation in the H. of...
No question has yet been taken by which real strength of parties in our Convention can be measured. There is not a majority of more than three or four on either side. Both sides claim it. I think however it rather lies as yet in favor of the Constitution. But it is so small as to justify apprehensions from accidents as well as change of opinion. An unwillingness to risk a positive decision on...
We are at length approaching the close of our deliberations on the several parts of the Constitution. The Judiciary Department has been gone over; though perhaps it may receive some additional disquisitions. The attack has apparently been less formidable than I had apprehended. Independently of some particular interests, the objections against it have not been calculated in my opinion to make...
The final question in our Convention has just been decided in the affirmative by 89 ays 79 noes. Recommendatory amendments will attend the act of ratification; but are yet to be settled. The business was closed with due decorum & solemnity; and an acquiescence of the minority can not be in the least doubted. Some of the leaders as might be imagined have however a keen feeling of their...