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Copies: Archives Nationales, Library of Congress To the Honorable Captain John Paul-Jones Commodore in the service of the United-States of America. In pursuance of a Resolution of Congress of the first of November 1783. a Copy wereof is hereunto annexed, I do hereby authorize and direct you to solicit as Agent for payment and satisfaction to the officers and crews citizens or subjects of the...
ALS : British Library I received the Letter you did me the honour of writing to me this Morning respecting the Settlement of Charges incurred in Holland, &c. Be so good as to send me a Copy of the Letter written by Mr. de Sartine, which you mention. On Sight of that I shall immediately give you an explicit Answer. With great Esteem, I am, Sir, Your most obedient & most huml Servt Addressed: A...
ALS : British Library; copies: Archives Nationales, Library of Congress, National Archives I return herewith the Papers you communicated to me yesterday. I perceive by the Extract from M. de Sartine’s Letter, that it was his Intention all the Charges which had accru’d upon the Serapis & Countess of Scarborough should be deducted from the Prize-money payable to the Captors, particularly the...
I had prepared a letter for you to the Count de Vergennes but I think it rather better before we resort to him that the Marechal de Castries should be again applied to and the resolution of Congress and certificate of Mr. Morris presented to his view. I therefore return you the papers left with me yesterday, and your draught of a letter inclosed this morning which is perfectly proper in all...
I received yesterday your favour of the 29’th, and have written on the subject of it to the Mareshall de Castries this morning. You shall have an answer as soon as I receive one. Will you be so good as to make an enquiry into all the circumstances relative to Peyrouse’s expedition which seem to ascertain his destination. Particularly what number of men and of what conditions and vocations had...
Supposing you may be anxious to hear from hence, tho’ there should be nothing interesting to communicate, I write by Mr. Cairnes merely to inform you that I have as yet received no answer from the Marshal de Castries. I am in daily expectation of one. Should it not be received soon I shall urge it again, which I wish to avoid however if possible, because I think it better to await with...
Mine of the 13th. informed you that I had written to the M. de Castries on the subject of Puchelberg’s interference. Yesterday I received his answer dated the 12th. In that he says that he is informed by the Ordonnateur that he has not been able to get an authentic roll of the crew of the Alliance, that, in the probable case of there having been some French subjects among them, it will be just...
I receive this moment a letter from the Marechal de Castries of which the inclosed is a copy. Having engaged to him to sollicit orders for the paiment of any parts of this money due to French subjects to be made here, and moreover engaged that in the mean time I will order paiment should any such claimants offer themselves, I pray you to furnish me with all the evidence you can as to what...
I think the method you propose for applying to the court of Denmark for the compensation due for the prizes taken by the squadron you commanded in Europe, is a proper one: therefore I will undertake to write to Mr. Adams on the subject, and have no doubt he will support Doctr. Bancroft in his sollicitations to the Danish minister at London for this purpose. I have the honour to be with the...
The resolution of Congress of Oct. 29. 1783. is the only one I have seen on the subject of the Danish business. That is directed expressly to ‘the Ministers plenipotentiary of the U.S. at the court of Versailles empowered to negociate a peace.’ It is true that I had the honour of being named in that commission and was preparing to come when we received news of the signature of the preliminary...
I have been honoured with your letter of the 18th of July from Paris enclosing certificates in favor of Captns Stack & Macarthy. I pray you to be assured that I should have pleasure in doing justice to the merits of these Officers, and obliging you if the power of deciding lay with me. But, though I am in sentiment with the Gentlemen who have declared in favor of the pretensions of Captns...
I take the liberty of inclosing to you a letter with which I am honoured from his Excellency the Marechal de Castries and a Memorial accompanying it, by which it appears that a certain Françoise Rippert claims to be paid 675 out of the portions of prize-money due to one Robinson, garde-marine and John Francfort pilot of the squadron which was under your command which sum she says they are...
I am honoured with your Letter of the 7 th. of the month from Paris—and will support D r. Bancrofts application to the Danish Minister, as fully as may by in my power—But perhaps it will be most prudent according to an Idea in one of your Letters to the D r. to begin by writing to the Baron D e Waltersdorff— This I suppose propose to do immediately—& when I obtain an answer will convey it to...
Since I had the honour of seeing you the other evening a letter from the board of treasury is come to hand,1 instructing me to receive the monies which you have collected here for the prizes, with an order justifying your paiment of them to me. There is a paragraph in the letter which looks as if they meant I should settle with you your proportion of these monies. It is not quite explicit, and...
I have now the honour to return you the papers you inclosed for my perusal. I am thoroughly satisfied that no person could so well have settled those matters as yourself. Your particular knowlege of all circumstances relative to them gave you the advantages which no other person possessed. With respect to the allowance to be made you for your trouble, I took the liberty of mentioning to you...
An opportunity having occurred of writing to America and to England by a person leaving Paris to-day , I have been unable sooner to answer the letter with which you honoured me two days ago. On recurring to the letter of the Board of treasury it becomes more evident to me that it does not empower me to settle the sum to which you are entitled; and that their meaning as to the arrangement they...
I am perfectly ready to transmit to America any accounts or proofs you may think proper. No body can wish more that justice may be done you, nor is more ready to be instrumental in doing whatever may ensure it. It is only necessary for me to avoid the presumption of appearing to decide where I have no authority to do it. I will this evening lodge in the hands of Mr. Grand the original order of...
I have received the Letter you did me the honour to write me, on the 10 th. of this month, and embrace the oppertunity by Colonel Trumbull to answer it, The Comte de Reventlow, complaisantly enough, inclosed my Letter to the Baron D e. Waltersdorf, in his dispatch to the Danish Ministry, and informed him that it related to a public affair so that there is no room to doubt, that the Letter went...
I have recieved the letter you did me the honor to write me on the 10 th: of this month & embrace the opportunity by Col o. Trumbull to answer it. The Comte de Reventlow complaisantly enough, inclosed my letter to the Baron de Waltersdorff in his despatch to the Danish Ministry & informed him that it related to a public affair so that there is no room to doubt that the letter went safe & that...
Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Commodore Jones. His memory had deceived him as to the sum offered by the court of Denmark to Doctr. Franklin. He has accordingly corrected it in his letter to Baron Blome. He is of opinion, that according to the instructions of Congress, any sum, however small, must be accepted, which shall be offered by that court. He does not apprehend however they will offer...
I avail myself of the liberty you have been so obliging as to give me, to trouble you with the care of the enclosed packet. It was my intention to have added to this trouble by encreasing the number of my letters, but business has prevented; let me pray therefore that you will do me the honor to present me, in affectionate terms to the Marqs de la Fayette, and assure him, that though hurried,...
Should this letter reach you in time, the purport of it is, to beg your care of the enclosed to the Marqs de la Fayette; and to inform you that all the letters, Memorials, and Papers of every kind which had been transmitted to me as President General of the Society of the Cincinnati, were forwarded (not expecting to attend it myself) to the last General meeting holden in this City but how they...
Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Commodore Jones and returns him the book he was so good as to give him the perusal of. He incloses him a letter he has just received, and asks his information as to the justice of the claim. He will be obliged now to occupy himself some two or three days about commercial arrangements just now made at Versailles and which he must translate, have printed, and...
The United States of America in Congress assembled having thought proper by their resolve of the 25th of October 1787 to authorize and instruct me finally to settle and conclude all demands of the United States against His Majesty the King of Denmark, on account of their prizes delivered to Great Britain during the late war, and to dispatch yourself or any other agent to the court of Denmark...
I have been so much indisposed, since my arrival here the 4th. from the fatigue and excessive cold I suffered on the Road, that I have been obliged to confine myself almost constantly to my Chamber. I have kept my Bed for several Days; but I now feel myself better, and hope the danger is over. On my arrival I paid my respects to the minister of France. He received me with great kindness. We...
I arrived at this place on the 10th. inst. and expected to have staid here a week only. Since the expiration of that week I have been in constant expectation of leaving it within 2. or 3. days. Such is my expectation at this moment; so that any letter you may be so good as to write me after the receipt of this will find me at Paris. Any one written before that will be unanswered till I get...
Your favor of Jan. 20/31 from Petersburg came safe to hand, and is the only proof we have received of your existence since you left Copenhagen. I mention this that, reflecting how and what you have written heretofore, you may know how and what you may write hereafter. I shall put nothing into this letter but what is important to you, and unimportant to any government thro which it may pass. To...