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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Jay, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 41-50 of 274 sorted by editorial placement
The Marquis of Carmarthen told me a Story of an Italian Ambassador who resided at this Court some Years ago, which was very humerous. It was his Excellencys Practice to take all the Newspapers, every Morning, and make up his Dispatches by transcribing Paragraphs from them. He began very gravely “Ho penetrato,” and went on from those Words to translate whatever he found which could amuse or...
M r Temple is gone out as Consul General: whether he will be received or not in that Character, before a Treaty of Commerce is made, I know not. if he Should not and Should not be provided with Credentials as Minister he will probably wait for farther Instructions. I have not made any Proposition to the Ministry, as is customary, to Send a Minister Plenipotentiary to America, and I Shall not...
Yesterday I received the two Letters You did me the Honour to write me on the 3. of August. The Instructions shall be obeyed as soon as possible. As to a Letter of Credence to the Queen, I believe it will now be unnecessary: but, when you Send me a Letter of Recall to the King, it may be proper to send another to the Queen: and, when You Send a new Minister, to give him a Letter of Credence to...
Having So good an Opportunity as this by M r Charles Storer, I do myself the Honour to transmit to Congress, by him, the Ratification of the Treaty, and Convention between the United States and the States General of the United Netherlands, which I received in Exchange for the Ratification of Congress transmitted to me. I Should wish that the Receipt of it may be noted in the Journal of...
We have the Honour to transmit to Congress, by M r Fitzhughs, the Treaty between the United States and the King of Prussia, Signed Seperately by your Ministers at the Several Places of their Residence, and by the Baron De Thulemeier at the Hague, in English and French and exchanged at the Hague in Presence of M r Short and M r Dumas. As this Treaty may be of considerable Importance to the...
I have received the Letter you did me the Honour to write me the 6. Sept r . The Act of Congress of the 18 of August, which you inclose, Shall be communicated as directed. I have the Honour to agree, fully with you in your Opinion, that “it is manifestly as much the Interest of this Country, to be well with Us, as for Us to be well with them” But this is not the Judgment of the English Nation:...
It has been the general Sense of our Country, Since the Peace, that it was their Duty and their Interest, to be impartial between the Powers of Europe, and observe a Neutrality in their Wars. This Principle is a wise one, upon the Supposition that those Powers will be impartial to Us, and permit Us to remain at Peace. but it is natural for England And France to be jealous of our Neutrality,...
Yesterday, at Eleven O Clock, I went by Appointment to Lord Carmarthens Office, and was admitted to his Lordship as soon as he arrived from his House. as this was an hour earlier, than the usual Appearance of the foreign Ministers at the Secretary of States Levee, I had time for a long Conversation with his Lordship. At first I presented him a Memorial, containing a Requisition, of immediate...
The Crown of Great Britain has Sometimes, pledged its Prerogative to relax the Navigation Act, but the Parliament and Nation would not admit of it. By the 15. Article of the definitive Treaty, between Great Britain and Portugal, Signed at Lisbon the 16. May 1703 “The Personal Priviledges and Freedom of Trade , which the Subjects of Great Britain, and the States of the United Provinces, at...
Yesterday at the Levee at St. James’s, the Marquis of Carmarthen came to me and told me, that he Should deliver those Papers I had communicated to him relative to the Correspondence between Governor Bowdoin and Captain Stanhope, to Lord How, in whose Department it was to consider such Things. His Lordship added that He Thought some of the Letters extreamly improper in a Captain of a Man of War...