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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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Colo. Franks having occasion for fifty pounds sterling to enable him to pursue his journey to London and New York, Mr. Grand has furnished him with that sum, for the reimbursement whereof I have drawn on you in his favor, and have to pray you to honour that draught and to charge it against the fund appropriated to the negociations with Marocco, as expended in that business. I have the honour...
Your favors by Colo. Franks have come safely to hand. He will set out from hence the 8th. inst. the packet being to sail from Havre the 10th. I inclose you the copy of a letter lately received from Mr. Barclay, and of the paper it inclosed. In a letter from Mr. Carmichael is a postscript dated Dec. 25. in the following words ‘since writing the preceding, the Portuguese Ambassador has pressed...
As I propose to write you on business by Mr. Cairnes who will set out in a few days for London, the object of the present letter is only to inform you that the Count de Vergennes died yesterday morning and that the Count de Montmorin is appointed his successor: and further to beg the favor of you to forward the inclosed by the first vessel from London. I set out on my journey on Sunday the...
I am now to acknoledge the receipt of your favor of Jan. 25. Colo. Franks sailed in the packet of this month from Havre for New York. This arrangement of the packets opens a direct communication between Paris and America, and if we succeed as I expect we shall in getting Honfleur made a freeport, I hope to see that place become the deposit for our Whale oil, rice, tobacco and furs, and that...
The Notables met yesterday. The king opened the assembly with a short speech, wherein he expressed his inclination to consult with them on the affairs of his kingdom, to receive their opinions on the plans he had digested, and to endeavor to imitate the head of his family Henry IV. whose name is so dear to the nation. The speech was affectionate. The Guarde des sceaux spoke about 20 minutes,...
The inclosed letter is come to hand since I had the honour of addressing you last. Will you be so good as to forward a copy to Mr. Jay? The assembly of Notables is held to secrecy, so that little transpires and this floats among so much incertain matter that we know not what can be depended on. 80. millions more of annual revenue and provincial assemblies are the certain objects. The giving to...
I returned about three weeks ago from a very useless voiage. Useless, I mean, as to the object which first suggested it, that of trying the effect of the mineral waters of Aix en Provence on my hand. I tried these because recommended among six or eight others as equally beneficial, and because they would place me at the beginning of a tour to the seaports of Marseilles, Bourdeaux, Nantes and...
I have been duly honoured with your’s of the 10th. inst. and am happy to hear of the success of your journey to Amsterdam. There can be no doubt of it’s ratification by Congress. Would to heaven they would authorize you to take measures for transferring the debt of this country to Holland before you leave Europe. Most especially is it necessary to get rid of the debt to the officers. Their...
Frouillé, the bookseller here who is engaged in having your book translated and printed, understanding that you were about publishing a sequel to it, has engaged me to be the channel of his prayers to you to favor his operation by transmitting hither the sheets of the sequel as they shall be printed; and he will have them translated by the same hand, which is a good one. It is necessary for me...
I take the liberty of troubling you with the inclosed bill of exchange for £46–17–10 sterling, rather than engage Mrs. Smith in so disagreeable a business. It will arrive in time I hope to cover the one drawn by General Sullivan on Colo. Smith, who certainly ought not to have been involved in the business. The parliament are obstinately decided against the stamp tax. Their last remonstrance is...
Since your favor of July 10. mine have been of July 17. 23 and 28. The last inclosed a bill of exchange from Mr. Grand on Tessier for £46–17–10 sterl. to answer Genl. Sullivan’s bill for that sum. I hope it got safe to hand, tho’ I have been anxious about it as it went by post and my letters thro’ that channel sometimes miscarry. From the separation of the Notables to the present moment has...
I received your favors by Mr. Cutting, and thank you sincerely for the copy of your book. The departure of a packet-boat, which always gives me full emploiment for some time before, has only permitted me to look into it a little. I judge of it from the first volume which I thought formed to do a great deal of good. The first principle of a good government is certainly a distribution of it’s...
This will be delivered you by young Mr. Rutledge. Your knowledge of his father will introduce him to your notice. He merits it moreover on his own account. I am now to acknolege your favors of Oct. 8 and 26 . That of August 25. was duly received, nor can I recollect by what accident I was prevented from acknoleging it in mine of Sep. 28. It has been the source of my subsistence hitherto, and...
In the month of July I received from Fiseaux & co. of Amsterdam a letter notifying me that the principal of their loan to the United states would become due the first day of January. I answered them that I had neither powers nor information on the subject, but would transmit their letter to the Board of treasury. I did so by the packet which sailed from Havre Aug. 10. The earliest answer...
I wrote you on the 12th instant, that is to say, by the last post. But as that channel of conveiance is sometimes unfaithful I now inclose you a copy of my letter of that date, and of the one of Fiseaux & co. inclosed in that. I have since received my letters by the packet, but, among them, nothing from the Board of Treasury. Still their orders may be among the dispatches with which Paul Jones...
Mr. Parker furnishes me an opportunity of acknoleging the receipt of your favors of Nov. 10. Dec. 6. 10. 18. and 25. which I avoid doing thro post. The orders on the subject of our captives at Algiers have come to me by the last packet. They are to be kept secret even from the captives themselves, lest a knolege of the interference of government should excite too extravagant demands. The...
I informed you in my letter of the 31st. of December of the measures I had taken relative to the reimbursement of the 51,000 gelders to Fizeaux & co. to wit, that I had asked the Willincks and Van Staphorsts to pay the interest, and written to the board of treasury for their orders as to the principal. I inclose you a letter just received from Fizeaux & Co. now Hugguer, Grand & Co. by which...
The Commissioners of the treasury have given notice to Willincks and Van Staphorsts that they shall not be able to remit them one shilling till the new government gets into action; and that therefore the sole resource for the paiment of the Dutch interest till that period is in the progress of the last loan. Willincks & V.S. reply that there is not the least probability of raising as much on...
I am in hopes daily of receiving a letter from you in answer to my last. The delay of the letters which contained the proposition to the board of treasury takes away all probability of their answering in time, and I foresee that I shall be closely pressed by circumstances on that point. I have settled your matter with de la Blancherie, at the sum you fixed (8 Louis). He demanded 12. but...
I received this day a letter from Mrs. Adams of the 26th. ult. informing me you would set out on the 29th. for the Hague. Our affairs at Amsterdam press on my mind like a mountain. I have no information to go on but that of the Willincks and Van Staphorsts, and according to that something seems necessary to be done. I am so anxious to confer with you on this, and to see you and them together,...
I have received with a great deal of pleasure the account of your safe arrival and joyful reception at Boston. Mr. Cutting was so kind as to send me a copy of the address of the assembly to you and your answer, which with the other circumstances I have sent to have published in the gazette of Leyden, and in a gazette here. It will serve to shew the people of Europe that those of America are...
I had the pleasure of writing to you on the 2d. of Aug. and of adding a P.S. of Aug. 6. You will have known since that that the interposition of Denmark, as auxiliary to Russia against Sweden, has been suppressed magisterially by England and Prussia. This seemed to prove that these two powers did not mean to enter into the war; that on the contrary they wished seriously to quiet things on the...
I now do myself the pleasure to inclose to you a copy of the Arret explanatory of that of Sep. 28. on the subject of our whale oils. Mr. Necker in a letter to me has renewed the promise of taking off the 10. sous per livre at the end of the next year. But at the same time he observes that whenever the national fishery shall be able to supply their demand for whale oil we must expect a repeal...
You may recollect that the Court of France by an edict, about 2 years since, opend a trade to the Americans to Mauritius and the french settlements in India upon the same terms as their own subjects pursue it. This permission we soon improved, and for two years past, many vessels have gone to Port Louis in the Isle of France from different parts of the Continent with cargos of the various...