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Draught of a treaty of Amity & Commerce between her most faithful Majesty the Queen of Portugal and the Algarva’s and the United States of America— The Parties being willing to fix in a permanent & equitable manner the rules to be observed in the Commerce they desire to establish between their respective Countries, have judged that the said end cannot be better obtained than by taking the most...
Art. XI. 2 + There shall be, a full and entire Liberty of Conscience allowed, to the Inhabitants and Subjects of each Party and no one Shall be molested, in regard to his Worship, provided he Submits, as to the public Demonstration of it, to the Laws of the Country. There Shall be given moreover Liberty when any Subjects or Inhabitants of either Party, Shall die in the Territory of the other,...
At a Meeting of the Society for Constitutional Information, held on Friday the 10 th. March 1786 Resolved Unanimously That the Thanks of this Society be given to His Excellency John Adams Esq r. Envoy and Minister plenipotentiary from the United States of America to the Court of Great Britain, for the Affectionate Mark of respect shewn by him to the Memory of their late Member, that real...
And it is further specially agreed that except the liberty of introducing woollens into the kingdom of Portugal which has been ceded to certain nations in compensation for their privileges yeilded on their grant to the commerce of Portugal, shall not be understood to be communicated to the citizens of the U. S. by this or any other article of the present treaty. which is the effect of a...
Observations Sur le Traité D’Amitie et de Commerce. N. 1 ere. We must conform ourselves, as to the Titles to the following Rule “between her most faithfull Majesty the Queen of Portugal and the Algarves”. &c Art. I. N. 2 We must observe in this Article the Same Rule, above established. The Rest will meet with no Difficulty. Art. II. N. 3. The same Observation, in the words underscored. it...
Her Most Faithfull Majesty, the Queen of Portugal and the Algarves, and the United States of America, desiring to ascertain in a permanent and equitable manner, the Rules to be observed, relative to the Intercourse, Correspondence and Commerce, which they intend to establish between their respective States, Countries, Citizens and Subjects, have judged that the said end, cannot be better...
D : Académie des sciences, Procès-verbaux, CIII (1784), 90–5. M.M. Franklin, Le Roy, Coulomb, Delaplace et l’abbé Rochon, ont fait le rapport suivant. M. le Marêchal de ségur ayant envoyé à l’Acade. deux projets, pour armer de paratonnerres, les magasins à poudre de la ville de Marseille et mandé dans la Lettre qui les accompagnoit, que le Roi desiroit que la compagnie les fit examiner et en...
I have been duly honored with your favor of the 2d. instant, and thank you for your attention to the wine forwarded for me by Messrs. le freres Roussac. I expect every moment to receive a proper order to the Douane of Rouen to permit these wines to pass on to Paris free of duty, which order shall accompany this letter, or be sent directly to the officers of the Douane at Rouen. I will beg the...
I am honored with your letter of the 9th. inst. informing me of the arrival of two cases of wine from Lisbon addressed to me. I now inclose a passport for it. I will beg the favor of you to send it to this place by water, and shall be ready to answer your draught for any expenses you have incurred, with many thanks for your kindness. I have the honor to be with the most perfect respect...
I have now the honor to inclose you the acquit à caution for the two cases of wine. They arrived only two days ago which has occasioned the delay of returning you this paper. I return you many thanks for your services and have the honor to be gentlemen your most obedient & most humble servant, PrC ( MHi ); endorsed. Enclosures not located.
I have duly received your favor of the 29th. of November. The Arret of Sep. 28. had been the subject of discussion with his majesty’s ministers as soon as it appeared. They will within a few days publish an explanatory arrêt exempting American oils from the operation of that of Sep. 28. In the mean time they have sent orders to all the ports to receive our oils. Tho’ these orders might not...
With a pleasing sensibility I received your favor of the 26th, and beg leave to offer you my sincere thanks for the favorable sentiments with which it abounds. I shall always feel pleasure when it may be in my power to render service to Lodge No. 39, and in every act of brotherly kindness to the Members of it; being with great truth Your affecte Brother and Obedt Servant ViAlL .
I reciev’d a few days since your Letter of Sepr. 12th and yesterday that of october the 12th and thank you most sincerly for them both. Your account of Holland entertaind me much. You must have improv’d your time well to have visited so many places and notic’d so much. The fatigue was too great for you. It was this that made you sick. I was rejoic’d to find your dissorder whatever it was for...
I have been waiting till I am out of all patience to hear that you are returnd to England. One or two vessels have sail’d for London without taking Letters for you. I did not know they were going till it was too late to write. I sent you a hasty line by Mr. Charles Bulfinch which I hope you receiv’d and to tell you the truth I have written you two letters Since, which I thought proper to...
I have not seen your Letter to Sister Cranch as yet, and cannot tell how you like your present Situation—the People—their Language— nor their manners. But I suppose all “is sweet” now the dear chosen Partner is by. I think I will not allow Cousin Nabby to be a proper Judge. She will pardon me I hope. She views things through an unpleasing medium—she neither feels, nor wishes to be interested...
Mr Lincoln has been here for several Days past— Tomorrow he intends to return to Hingham, & has offered to carry a Letter to either of my Sisters— I would not let so good an Opportunity pass, since I have often experienced how good, & how pleasant it was to receive a few Lines from a dear Friend, informing me of particular Circumstances which are interesting to them, whether it be of Joy, or...
I wrote you a hasty letter from New-York, just to acknowledge the receipt of yours, No. 5, the week before last; since which I have not heard from you, nor have I had an opportunity to write. * * * * * * * Pennsylvania has already appointed her Senators, who are Mr. Morris and a Mr. McLain. Poor —— is, then, disappointed; for he went home to make interest for himself, as it was said. There are...
I have sent one Letter on Board capt Cushing but it is so long since that unless I Write again you will not feel as if you had heard from me for a long time— Cousin JQA & Billy have been at home above a week. Cousin charles was here yesterday. he came to wait upon mrs Hilliard & Daughter— your Sons are all well We are busy prepairing for commencment for although we do so little by way of...
Accept my dear Sister a thousand thanks for your charming Journal, it is just Such an one as I wish’d, so particular that while reading it, I could not help fancying my self with you. We hoped as we had Such fine weather for six weeks after you Sail’d, that you would have had a quicker Passage than I find you had. You did not feel more joy when you set your feet upon the British Coast, than I...
So I see by the papers that Amelia has become Mrs: Smith , and this the 12th. of June. The news came by the way of Philadelphia, and the first intelligence I had was from our News-Papers. By Callahan, who is expected here every day from London, I hope it will be announced to us officially. Joy to her and to you all! May it be attended with every blessing and pleasure the sanguine wish can...
This Day is the Aniversary of Eleven Years since our dear Mother left us poor Pilgrims, to sojourn here a little longer upon Earth, while she (as we trust) went to spend an eternal Sabbath in the blissful regions of immortality. The anual return of those Days, upon which some beloved Friend has been taken from me, I devote more particularly to the recollection of their amiable Qualities, and...
After a Passage of two days, against contrary Winds, and a terrible Jolt through the Mud, from Helvoet, I arrived here this day, in good health and not bad Spirits. The Princes Birth day is on Saturday: so that I shall not be able to take Leave before Monday, and if I go to Amsterdam afterwards, I shall not be able to leave that City before Wednesday or Thursday: so that I fear you cannot...
We have received from Congress a Resolution by which We are to be impowered to negotiate a Treaty of Commerce with G. B. My self Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jay. This will detain me in Europe this Winter. If this Letter arrives in Season, that you can come to me this Fall with Miss Nabby, I shall be Supreamly happy to see you. But Still Things are so unsettled in Congress that you may expect to...
I have past through the Ceremonies of taking Leave of the States General, the Prince and Princess &c to the Satisfaction of all Parties—and have been feasted at Court, and all that.— made my Compliments to the Prince on the 8. of March his Birth Day, and to the Princess at her Drawing Room &c &c &c. and should have been in London at this hour if you had not have laid a Plott, which has brought...
I have not wrote you my dear Aunt for a long time, much too long I confess; and even now those motives which have prevented, continue in force: A barreness of Subject is of all preventives the most dissagreable and I find it is like to prevail and increase in me daily; motives however more powerful have overcome this; and I am induced to write—tho—I triffle. Love, gratitude and esteem, I feel;...
There is another vessel up which will sail soon. What I may have omited by this I shall write by that. Our uncle Quincy was well a few hours since is glad to see his Friends but cannot be perswaided out. Cousin Cotton remains the same he was, Flying from spray to spray without determining Where to chuse his Partner. If his Father should marry as he will certainly do as soon as he can get time...
The Roads have been so bad for several Weeks past, that there has been but little travelling, and it has been difficult to get a conveyance. I did not know when Cousin Charles sent his Letter. I intended to have written and conveyed them together, and to have thanked you most heartily, most tenderly for your excellent Care of Mr. Shaw, and for your ingenuity in managing his Case so exactly...
I have been honoured with your two letters of Octob. 19. and 25. by Mr. Fox and Doctor Rodgers since the date of my last. I am to thank you for your state of Stanhope’s case. It has enabled me to speak of that transaction with a confidence of which I should other­ wise have been deprived by the different state of it in the public papers and the want of information from America. I have even...
How provoking it is to be told that a vessel is to sail next week with our Letters and then have it stay in the Harbour six Weeks. I thought till yesterday that Capn. Young was half way to London at least, and behold he will not leave Boston this week. The Letters will be so old, that they will lose much of their value, but tis no fault of mine. I have been waiting some time without writing...
I heartily rejoice to hear of Your safe arrival; pray make My best respects acceptable to Mr. Adams, Miss Nabby, and Your Son. I can write but little, being very weak, confined by lameness, about 8 Weeks, but am growing better; this day, I was carried out and put into a Chaise (the first time of being out) and rid out on the Farm; but I hope to go to Connecticut, next Month. They at Mr....
Most Sincerely do I congrattulate you, Madam, and your amiable Daughter upon your Safe arrival at the wished for Port: my busy imagination persued you through the whole of your voyage untill it Saw you Safely and joyfully Landed upon the British Shores. I doubt not but long before this, you have been made happy, in meeting with Mr. Adams your long absent Friend. May Heaven reward him for the...
As I was seting quite alone this evening somebody came in from Boston with a Hankerchief full of Letters from you my dear, dear Sister. The Girls are neither of them at home, but I have ventur’d to open their Pacquits also, and a hearty laugh I have had at the extravagant Figures you have sent. Yes my sister our Ladies are foolish enough to deserve some of the ridicule. Those unnatural...
Should I my Dear Sister, too much alarm the Heart of an affectionate Mother, solicitous for the welfare of her Children if I were to say plainly, that I wish Mr JQA had never left Europe. That he had never come into our Family. Then we should not have known him. Then we should not have been so grieved. Then we should not have this ocasion of Sorrow. His leaving it.—Indeed my Sister, our House...
Mr. Short’s return the night before last availed me of your favour of Aug. 12. I immediately ordered the shoes you desired which will be ready tomorrow. I am not certain whether this will be in time for the departure of Mr. Barclay or of Colo. Franks, for it is not yet decided which of them goes to London. I have also procured for you three plateaux de dessert with a silvered ballustrade round...
Your Letter of the 23d. has made me the happiest Man upon Earth. I am twenty Years younger than I was Yesterday. It is a cruel Mortification to me that I cannot go to meet you in London, but there are a Variety of Reasons decisive against it, which I will communicate to you here. Meantime, I Send you a son who is the greatest Traveller, of his Age, and without Partiality, I think as promising...
I am to acknolege the honor of your letter of Jan. 29. and of the papers you were so good as to send me. They were the latest I had seen or have yet seen. They left off too in a critical moment; just at the point where the Malcontents make their submission on condition of pardon, and before the answer of government was known. I hope they pardoned them. The spirit of resistance to government is...
Here I am, all alone for a great rarity. There is nothing more agreeable to me for a little while , than what the world calls Solatude. I have but one Servant maid in the House, and one Scholar in the Study. So that we are quite still. I hear nothing but the busy hum of Flies, and the warbling of a Wren, and spring-Bird in the Orchard, that set and swell their little throats as if the kind...
The three Letters which Mrs. Adams honoured me with were received at Paris, and should have been answered, had an oppertunity offered. Permit me to pass an encomium on that prudence which dictates silence on painful Subjects, and to assure her while honour guides my actions and is my ruling star thro’ Life—I shall alway’s endeavour to appear as if I had taken the deepest draught from the...
This being the day on which, according to my calculation, my daughter would be crossing the channel, I had calculated the course from Dover to Calais and was watching the wind when your favour of the 6 th. was put into my hands. that of June 27. had been received four days ago. I perceived that that had happened which I had apprehended, that your goodness had so attached her to you that her...
It gives me great Pleasure to hear of your safe Arrivall in Europe, and that you are once more enjoying the Society and Friendship of Your Bosom Friend. I have wrote to Mr. Adams, relative to a piece of Land you He formerly exchanged with Thos. Thayer and now claimed by his Son in Law James Thayer. You will be able to refresh his Mind with respect the Exchange and inform him of the...
My dear sister will I am sure excuse me if I send her now but a short Letter—when she is inform’d that there is but one day between this & commencment & that I have but just hear’d that cap t. Folger will sail this week It is true we are doing but little but it makes us more work than Ten such entertainments at home. every thing is dress’d here, & to be cut cold at cambridge except Green Peas....
I have had another Fever, which brought me low, but as it has carried off certain Pains and Lamenesses the Relicks of the Amsterdam Distemper, I am perswaded it will do me, much good. I am going next Week to London, with my son. I may Stay Six Weeks, if nothing from Congress calls me away Sooner. I have only to repeat my earnest Request that you and our Daughter would come to me, as soon as...
Indeed my ever honoured Aunt I should have been much disapointed if my Cousin had not brought me a letter from you. Your pen Madam is never so far exhausted that every sentence that falls from it does not yeild pleasure or instruction. In your letters indeed those qualities are so happily blended that we cannot take from the one without distroying the other. I hope before this you have heard...
The last year I acquainted you with the death of my mother, & I am sorry that I have now to inform you of that of my father, an event which has renewed my griefs, & will again excite your sympathetic feelings. If any person bid fair for length of years, I thought this was the Case with my late valuable parent, but heaven it seems, to whose decisions it becomes us always humbly to submit, as...
Captain Cushing arriv’d last Monday after a tedious Passage It was so long since I receiv’d any Letters from you that I began to be very impatient. Cousin JQA had one in the winter but I have only heard of it. he forgot that I should want to see it & so did not bring it with him this vacancy your sons are now all of them with me. cousin JQA return’d last evening from an excurtion. I perswaided...
And a good story you shall have, Madam, as you desire. Know then that your friends both at Haverhill and Braintree are well. But I had forgot. One sad stroke has caused us much trouble, Aunt Smith is dead . She died about a month since. She was first seized with a lethargic fit, was lost to every thing, but apparently had recovered from her disorder and was preparing to take a journey as far...
It is an age since I have had the honor of a letter from you, and an age and a half since I presumed to address one to you. I think my last was dated in the reign of king Amri, but under which of his successors you wrote, I cannot recollect. Ochosias, Joachaz, Manahem or some such hard name. At length it is resumed: I am honoured with your favor of July 23. and I am at this moment writing an...
I am this day, Madam, favoured with your Letter of the 19th. of March, and embrace the earliest Oppertunity of informing You, that it is highly probable, Congress will make their Arrangements, for negotiating commercial Treaties this Week. The Subject has several Months been prepared, for Deliberation, but this has been prevented by the Want of a full Representation; untill of late, there...
Mr. Storer is arriv’d and I have got my Letter and am very sorry to hear you have been so sick. If I had receiv’d this Letter before those by Callahan I should have been very uneasey till I could have heard again. I Will hope you are by this time perfectly recover’d. You will see by mine of November 29th that our thoughts in September and October were imploy’d about the same melancholy...
I did not design to write another line till I could get my pen mendid but not a creature can I get to do it, and I am so affraid that Captain Lyde will sail without my Pacquit that I dare not venture to wait till the children come from college tomorrow. I hope to see the dear Boys, and if the ship should not go so soon as I expect I will write again. I shall certainly write by the way of New...