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Monitor, Amelia? I don’t know whether the idea is more flattering or affronting. What an old fellow would one suppose Eugenio to be, from the task you assign him! But to advise, as you say, is the criterion of friendship, and this only was the extent of my offer to you on your arrival. I thought it would be of advantage to you to consult, or, to use a more familiar term, to chat, with one...
Very well, Madam; this fine house of the Comte de Rouhaut, spacious Gardens, Courts &c. have seemingly banished from your thoughts humble Basinghall Street . I say seemingly, since I am not willing to believe it really so. Don’t you remember you told me once you wished me to write you, and that you would duly acknowledge my letters? This was, however, when we were in different Quarters of the...
I wrote you this, Amelia, in answer to yours, No. 8, received a day or two ago, for which accept my thanks. I had really begun to think our correspondence had, to use a common phrase, “seen its best days,” as you had suffered so long a time to pass without improving it. Now I hope other things. The number of this I cannot give you, as, being in the country, I have not my memorandum book near....
My word I mean always to keep, Amelia, so I write you from this place, though my letter may be barren of subjects to entertain or interest you. One thing, however, there is, which I hope, and am willing to be sure, is not indifferent to you, and that is the information of our safe arrival here. It is a matter of no little joy and satisfaction to me, be assured; your participation, as it will...
I am persuaded you will be pleased with this letter, if you were not ever before with one from me, because in the first place, it will inform you of my safe arrival among my friends, and at the same time may give you some information respecting yours. I write you therefore with pleasure on my part. Our arrival here be assured was attended with much satisfaction on all sides. I need not paint...
I join fully with you, Amelia, that whatever is, is right. Yet I cannot but regret that the winds hurried me so soon from England. But weigh the matter, says prudence. The office was important, the task arduous, and very much expected from it. Had I failed, what an everlasting blot. This is a thought, Amelia, that would have staggered me in my wish to go; nor would self-examination have aided...
Times without number have I been questioned on the history you communicated to me just before I left London, and which I touched upon in my last, by Capn: Lyde. I find that all our friends are anxiously interested in the matter, and I must confess I find in my heart to join with them. Though we all highly applaud what has lately been done, y et many are fearfull of an accommodation. “The...
What in the name of wonder can you be doing on your side the Atlantic? We hear no more of you than if you were in the regions above the Moon. It is not to be long so I hope, for we are become very impatient now for news. Here, we seem to be almost at a stand, as it were; waiting for good tidings from afar. I fancy the case is much the same with you. With this I send you some newspapers, which...
And a good story you shall have, Madam, as you desire. Know then that your friends both at Haverhill and Braintree are well. But I had forgot. One sad stroke has caused us much trouble, Aunt Smith is dead . She died about a month since. She was first seized with a lethargic fit, was lost to every thing, but apparently had recovered from her disorder and was preparing to take a journey as far...
You know, Amelia, I am never backward in writing my friends: therefore, when I tell you that I have four of your favours by me unanswered, I trust you will not lay the blame on my good will. Some of them were received where I could neither acknowledge them myself, nor had I one to do it for me, and the others came at an inconvenient time. Be persuaded, however, that the will is good, (as,...
Pray, Madam, be carefull how you send Cards to your friends on this side the water another time. It seems that since you have mentioned Amelia’s intended Connection, you have sent a Card, with something wound round it, on which was written an invitation to you and Mr: A—— to dinner from Mr: and Mrs. Wm. Smith . This was taken for a certain Information of Amelia’s having entered the marriage...
So I see by the papers that Amelia has become Mrs: Smith , and this the 12th. of June. The news came by the way of Philadelphia, and the first intelligence I had was from our News-Papers. By Callahan, who is expected here every day from London, I hope it will be announced to us officially. Joy to her and to you all! May it be attended with every blessing and pleasure the sanguine wish can...
By M r: Thaxter I ought in duty to have written you, and, not having done it, I fear you may be inclined to lay some neglect to my Charge. I have only to say in apology that our time, from our arrival to M r: Thaxter’s departure, was constantly employed—and I hope to his satisfaction, as that was our object here.— My motive in writing to you is particular. I have acknowledgements to make for...
I am honored by the receipt of your favor of the 11 th. instant, and should not trouble again, (for I know you are not fond of receiving useless letters—) but to assure you I participate the satisfaction you say you enjoy from some late Circumstances.— Permit me therefore first to congratulate you on the recovery of your health, & of the prospect you have of its being preserved to you in a...
I had the honor of forwarding your Excellency a letter, received from M r: Dumas, by the Post before last.— It came to hand a day or two before; but, not being able to find a private hand so soon as I imagined, from M r: Dumas’ letter to me, that it was necessary you should have it, I concluded it best & therefore forwarded it by the Post under cover to your Son— M r: Dumas writes me that,...
Pardon me if I again trouble you with a letter. I plead for my apology that the occasion does not relate entirely to myself—but in a degree concerns you.— Yesterday, upon the Exchange, M r: Burgess , of whom I have made mention before, desired M r: Atkinson, my Brother-in-law, to acquaint me that a M r: Petree , one of the Committee of Merchants respecting American Affairs, wished to have some...
While I was at S t: Quentin the last Winter, I was admitted to see a very large manufactory of Looking-Glass— ’Twas a particular priviledge, and allowed to but very few—yet the Gentleman to whom it belonged allowed me to ask any question—reserving to himself, however, the right of not answering those which should be improper— There were several hundred men at work, and all being in their...
In obedience to your Commands, by M r: West , respecting Lodgings, I have been, yesterday & today, in search of such as I thought would suit you, but have not been able to find any.— There are many houses to be let—but these are either too large or too small; your direction being for “a Drawing Room, Dining Room, three Chambers, & one for one Servant only”— Besides, in all these Houses, the...
’Tis my duty to write you as well as my inclination— The first point I will not urge further than to assure you I am full sensible of it, as I know you are an enemy to useless words: The latter point, Sir, let me beg to be indulged in— I wish my Correspondance could be of benefit to you, and I am willing to think it may perhaps at some time or other— Should it afford you any degree of...
I made a mistake in my other letter respecting the Medical Society— ’Twas you who settled the Correspondance between the Society of Medicine at Paris & our Medical Society here— I well remember the notes that passed on the occasion between you & Mons r: Vicq d’Azir, perpetual Secretary— Our medical Society were extremely pleased at what you had done for them, & wrote them, (immediately on your...
Enthusiasm is as necessary to the science of Politics as of Religion: without zeal in the Cause there can be no success— Such zeal was once conspicuous, and this enthusiasm has borne us hitherto through a difficult & dangerous war. But that it should now leave us, all at once, is disagreable—not more so, however, than apparently true— What can have become of this said public spirit I cannot...
To send a number of letters under cover to you without one line to yourself, were it only by way of apology, would, I think, have rather an unseemly appearance, & might be somewhat inexcusable— I know you do not like to be baulked in this manner—and to prevent this disappointment, I write a few lines, if it be only to assure you of my good will & to wish that I had wherewithal to afford you...
Nay, Sir, do not confine enthusiasm & patriotism entirely to Tories & Refugees— You have always had a good share of it, and I was going to claim a little too— You will see by my letter to M rs: Adams how I mean to dispose of my self here—w h: I hope will meet with your approbation— On an other score I wish to ask your advice & opinion—but I always remember what you once told me, viz t: that,...
Excuse me if I only enclose letters to your family— I have not wherewithal to gratify you in the News way, as our brightest prospects are but gloomy—and I know you have enough to vex you where you are— I mentioned to M rs: Adams a County Convention forming here in the County of Bristol— They have called upon almost every other County to join them— Worcester however has given them a positive...
I wish you would finish your business in London & return home—We want you here more than a little— Every thing seems to be going wrong, and there is great reason to fear that we soon shall be in a state of anarchy & confusion— When Government has not energy eno: to enforce the laws, what is to be done? When our executive Officers have not power to suppress Mobs, Riots & armed associations,...
M r: Martin , who will deliver you this, is a Kinsman of ours & therefore I take the liberty of begging your notice of him: assuring you I shall think myself equally obliged by any attentions he may receive.— Since writing the within there has been an insurrection in the State of New-Hampshire— President Sullivan & the Court were sitting at Exeter: an armed mob, ab t: 500, surrounded the House...
I made a mistake in my other letter respecting the Medical Society—’Twas you who settled the Correspondance between the Society of Medicine at Paris & our Medical Society here—I well remember the notes that passed on the occasion between you & Mons r. Vicq d’Azir, perpetual Secretary.. Our medical Society were extremely pleased at what you had done for them, & wrote them, (immediately on your...
Enthusiasm is as necessary to the science of Politics as of Religion: without zeal in the Cause there can be no success—Such zeal was once conspicuous, and this enthusiasm has borne us hitherto through a difficult & dangerous war. But that it should now leave us, all at once, is disagreable—not more so, however, than apparently true. What can have become of this said public spirit I cannot...
To send a number of letters under cover to you without one line to yourself, were it only by way of apology, would, I think, have rather an unseemly appearance, & might be somewhat inexcusable—I know you do not like to be baulked in this manner, and to prevent this disappointment I write a few lines, if it be only to assure you of my good will & to wish that I had wherewithal to afford you...
Nay, Sir, do not confine enthusiasm & patriotism entirely to Tories & Refugees—You have always had a good share of it, and I was going to claim a little too—You will see by my letter to M rs: Adams how I mean to dispose of my self here—w h: I hope will meet with your approbation. On another score I wish to ask your advice & opinion—but I always remember what you once told me viz t: that, where...
Excuse me if I only enclose letters to your family. I have not wherewithal to gratify you in the News way, as our brightest propects are but gloomy—and I know you have enough to vex you where you are— —, I mentioned to M rs: Adams a County Convention forming here in the County of Bristol—They have called upon almost every other County to join them— Worcester however has given them a positive...
I wish you would finish your business in London & return home—We want you here more than a little—Every thing seems to be going wrong, and there is great reason to fear that we soon shall be in a state of anarchy & confusion—When Government has not energy eno: to enforce the laws, what is to be done? When our executive Officers have not power to supress Mobs, Riots & armed associations, what...
M r: Martin , who will deliver you this, is a Kinsman of ours & therefore I take the liberty of begging your notice of him: assuring you I shall think myself equally obliged by any attentions he may receive— Since writing the within there has been an insurrection in the State of New-Hampshire—President Sullivan & the Court were sitting at Exeter: an armed mob, ab t: 500, surrounded the House &...