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London, 28 Nov. 1786. Requests that TJ obtain letters of introduction from his friends in Paris for James and Nathaniel Hayward, of Charleston, S.C., who expect to reside for some time in Dijon in order to acquire a knowledge of the language; has made the same request of Lafayette. They are “young Gentlemen of Character and Fortune” who will “do honour to your Introduction”; if they go to...
London, 18 Sep. 1787 . Introduces Benjamin Parker, nephew of Daniel Parker, a student at “Cambridge Colledge in Massachusetts,” who will spend three months in Paris before returning to America; “being hard of hearing … prevents him from seeking society with that goùt which might be expected from his age and situation.” RC ( MHi ); 2 p.; endorsed. Recorded in SJL as received 23 Sep. 1787.
I have the honor of informing your Excellency, that I inspected yesterday morning, the following british Regiments bound for Halifax Viz. 17th 33d 37th 42d 54th & 57th. The fleet sailed in the afternoon. I am still of opinion that the evacuation will be compleat within the time mentioned in my last—I am Your Excellency’s Most Obliged Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Letter not found: from William Stephens Smith, 1 Aug. 1788. GW wrote Smith on 30 Aug. : “I was favoured, a few days ago, with your letter, dated the first day of this Month.”
I have only time to enclose your Excellency a Copy of a Letter received yesterday from Mr. Barclay, and to acknowledge the receipt of your favour of the 9th. Ulto. by Mr. Bullfinch. The maps, occasioned by Mr. B’s excurtion in the country after his arrival, did not reach me untill the 6th. inst. Mr. Neele took them in hand on the 7th. and will finish the plate within the period mentioned and...
The advances which I was under the necessity of making preparitory to my Journey, & the most extraordinary expences necessarily attending a Journey thro’ Spain & Portugal, together with my expences at this Court, increased by a Severe indisposition, has rendered it necessary for me to draw on your Excellency for one hundred pounds strg. at 30 day’s Sight, you will please to place it to account...
Inclosed is Mr. Jones’s answer to your Question. I have given to Mr. Stockdale 4 Vols. of Pope’s Iliad and Odysey, which were not ready in time for the last parcel. They will accompany those last ordered from Stocke . The Compendio del Vocabolerio degli Accademici della Crusca for Mr. Short at 13/6 and Cicero on old age, I think for you, price ⅙.—I forward Lackingtons list of the books sent...
The three Letters which Mrs. Adams honoured me with were received at Paris, and should have been answered, had an oppertunity offered. Permit me to pass an encomium on that prudence which dictates silence on painful Subjects, and to assure her while honour guides my actions and is my ruling star thro’ Life—I shall alway’s endeavour to appear as if I had taken the deepest draught from the...
I wrote you by Mr. Littlepage on the 4th. inst. That Letter contains an account of Cash recieved and disposed of on your account. I do not know whether I have made a just calculation of the Livrs. expended in Paris on my account, but this and every other article is submitted to your alteration. I enclose the reviews of the last Month as both your and Mr. Adams’s Names are mentioned, and have...
I did myself the honour of writing you from Harwich and Amsterdam— we have been very unfortunate as to roads & weather and were not able to reach Bresleau, time enough for the Review there— those of this place and at Potsdam will be finished about the 20 th. when I shall attempt a rapid passage to London by the way of Paris, I shudder at the Idea of tresspassing too far upon your indulgence—...
I had the honor of addressing you on the 18th. inst. in answer to your favor of the 9th. of August, since which I have received yours of the 13th. inst. Mr. A. returned here on the 7th. or 8th. He took up the subject on which you impatiently wait an answer on his arrival, a short letter on which, you must have received before this. However he is still thinking on it, and you will hear more...
I accidently encountered Mr: Kissam the young Gentleman who came passenger in the last Packet from New York, he having dispatches addressed to you from Mr. Jay, I opened them with an intention if I found anything in them which might be necessary for you to be immediately acquainted with, to have been the bearer of them to Portsmouth but finding they only contained letters of recall dated New...
I replyed fully to yours of the 9th. Ulto. on the 18th. of the same sinee which I have not had the pleasure of hearing from you. Mr. Dilley informs me the Books are shiped agreable to the inclosed Bill of Lading accompanied with the account ammounting to £25/14.0 sterg. I have also the honor of forwarding a Copy of a Letter received this morning from Mr. Barclay at Morocco of the 26th. of...
I have received yours of the 16th. Ulto. When I sent the press I gave the Gentleman who carried it a Letter for you of the 21st. of May which you do not acknowledge the receipt of, or at least but one of that date. It contained the ammount of what I gave for the press, which was 5 Guineas and 5/ for the Box = £5.10. The press shall be sent agreable to your request. I am called off, and have...
I have received yours of the 23d. ulto. The first printing press has been forwarded some time. Mr. Woodmason is disposed to consider himself free’d from every obligation respecting the safe conveyance of his machine to Paris. He looks upon himself acquitted on presenting the Bill of lading, and receipt of the Captain. Upon this principle, the one is forwarded and payed for. I hope no...
I wrote you last fryday’s post and by Mr. Parker on Saturday. In the former, I find I left out, on the credit side, the 2 pr. of shoes which Mr. Short paid for, amounting to 13/4, which deducted from the £1.10.7 which I make the ballance between us, reduces it to seventeen and three pence. Mr. Adam , setts off this morning for the Hague to take leave in person of their High Mightinesses and...
Your goodness will doubtless attribute my silence to a necessary attention to the duties of office, which since my arrival, have been neither few nor small . I was at a loss when I took my leave for Expressions to convey to you a proper Idea of the impression which your politeness and Hospitality had made on my mind, and now I can only thank and assure you, that while gratitude is considered a...
The detachment made from the british Camp mentioned in my last to Your Excellency for the purpose of suppressing certain riots and dis-orders near Huntington on Long Island, returned on the morning of the 29th Ulto, they have taken up a Number of the most respectable Inhabitants of that part of the Country—who are charged with robbery—confin’d in the Provost, and under tryal by General court...
Mr. Adams wrote you on the 11th. ulto. by post, accompanied with an Answer to Mr. Lamb signed, the receipt of which is not yet acknowledged. I immagine he is waiting for your answer to that before he decides on the subject.—The business of the Secretary has been long done, but whether it will be made use of I cannot yet discover. I am Sir your Excellency’s most obedt Humble servt., RC ( MHi );...
I received your Excellency’s Letter of the 31st Ulto & am always rendered particularly happy, whenever my conduct meets your approbation. I must acknowledge myself obliged by the advice contain’d in the latter part of the Letter relative to granting Passports to Persons going into the Country—protections I never presumed to give and generally informed the persons that the passes were not given...
John left yours of yesterday’s date with the order for 8 Guineas at my house this morning. I have not seen him and it shall be paid in the morning. I am apprehensive your calculations may yet fall short, should this wind continue in its station. Supposing it to have been impossible for you to have passed this morning, I dispatch this, to request you will draw on me for what you want, and I...
It is with particular pleasure I communicate to you the joyfull news of M rs: Smiths safe delivery of a Son, which took place between seven & eight the last Evening, she was not the least indisposed untill six o’Clock & by ½ past seven all was well & tranquil, both continue composed and easy, but Nabby desires me to tell you that she is much disappointed, she had made the things, to adorn a...
I was so exceedingly hurried the few Days that I remained in London after the receipt of your polite Letter (preparing for this excurtion, to the Prussian Camp) that it was not in my power to assure you how much I thought myself honoured by your attention, and of my determination to avail myself of the opertunity of establishing a Corespondence where the returns would be so evidently in my...
I have the honor of forwarding to your Excellency a Copy of a Letter I received this day from Mr. Barclay at Morrocco dated the 16th. of July ulto. I have sent a Copy to Mr. Jay and shall forward a duplicate by the next Vessel. I am your Excellency’s most Obedt. Humble Servt., RC ( MHi ): postmarked; addressed. Noted in SJL as received 23 Sep. 1786. Enclosure: Barclay to Commissioners, 16 July...
By the Bearer Capt. Pinkney I return the Glass which your Excellency was so obliging as to lend me at the end of the last Campaign I should have forwarded it before had I not expected to have had an opportunity of presenting it in person—I have been confined for six day’s past to my Room with a severe ague & fever which paid me a visit every day—the Bark has at last broke it but left me very...
The enclosed Letters came by the last Packett I forwarded to your Excellency in the begining of the last Month several Letters which I took from the post office, I hope they met with a safe conveyance—By Capt. Pickering I on the 22d Ulto I forwarded the Glass Your Excellency was pleased to lend me about the close of the last Campaign—nothing material has taken place since Mr Parkers last...
Calculation and Business only I have received your favour of the 2d. inst. and will attempt to explain the two articles with which I credited you in my account Current of the 3d. of Decr. ulto. The first article ammounting to Liv. 113. is stated by Mr. Short in his letter of the 21. of Novr. 1787 and is composed as follows, viz.  8 ells of double florence at 4. 15. = 38.  0  6 ditto of White...
I dare say, my friend, when you receive this, you will think I have moved with great rapidity. There have but two things occurred on the road which are worth mentioning; the one is my having met Mr. Rucker; we stopped, jumped out of our carriages, I into the dust, and he out of it; he had a great coat on, and his beard he brought from Paris with him; I wonder how it passed the custom-house...
I had the Pleasure of receiving your letter of the 10th. inst. the last evening, and should have done myself the Honour of meeting You at New Rochelle this day were I not kept in check by Mr: Jay’s proposing that if I would wait untill the morning he would accompany me to meet you at Kings Bridge, where we suppose you will be at 12 o.Clock— The Arrangements for your accomodation and that of...
In a Letter which I wrote your Excellency this morning, I mention forwarding by Mr. Smith your press, but it is not in his power to take it. I shall send it by the first Gentleman who will not be much incommoded by it. Perhaps Mr. Trumbull or Dr. Bancroft will have the pleasure of presenting it. This delay will enable me to have a board made to fit it, in which tho’ no great ingenuity is...