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One among our many follies Was calling in for Steaks at Dolly’s Whereby we’ve lost—& feel like Sinners That we have miss’d much better dinners Nor do we think that us ‘tis hard on Most humbly thus to beg your pardon And promise that another time We’ll give our reason not our rhime So we’ve agreed—our Nem: Con: vote is That we thus early jointly give you notice For as our rule is to be clever...
MS not found. Printed from facsimile in WSS ’s hand in Magazine of American History, with Notes and Queries , [1879], 3:44–45; addressed: “His Excellency John Adams, &c., &c., &c., corner Brooks Street, Grosvenor Square.” The signatures were written in a circle and attached on a separate foldout page. The address was provided only in the Magazine article’s text. Published as “A Diplomatic...
I have only time to enclose your Excellency a Copy of a Letter received yesterday from Mr. Barclay, and to acknowledge the receipt of your favour of the 9th. Ulto. by Mr. Bullfinch. The maps, occasioned by Mr. B’s excurtion in the country after his arrival, did not reach me untill the 6th. inst. Mr. Neele took them in hand on the 7th. and will finish the plate within the period mentioned and...
The advances which I was under the necessity of making preparitory to my Journey, & the most extraordinary expences necessarily attending a Journey thro’ Spain & Portugal, together with my expences at this Court, increased by a Severe indisposition, has rendered it necessary for me to draw on your Excellency for one hundred pounds strg. at 30 day’s Sight, you will please to place it to account...
London, 28 Nov. 1786. Requests that TJ obtain letters of introduction from his friends in Paris for James and Nathaniel Hayward, of Charleston, S.C., who expect to reside for some time in Dijon in order to acquire a knowledge of the language; has made the same request of Lafayette. They are “young Gentlemen of Character and Fortune” who will “do honour to your Introduction”; if they go to...
Inclosed is Mr. Jones’s answer to your Question. I have given to Mr. Stockdale 4 Vols. of Pope’s Iliad and Odysey, which were not ready in time for the last parcel. They will accompany those last ordered from Stocke . The Compendio del Vocabolerio degli Accademici della Crusca for Mr. Short at 13/6 and Cicero on old age, I think for you, price ⅙.—I forward Lackingtons list of the books sent...
The three Letters which Mrs. Adams honoured me with were received at Paris, and should have been answered, had an oppertunity offered. Permit me to pass an encomium on that prudence which dictates silence on painful Subjects, and to assure her while honour guides my actions and is my ruling star thro’ Life—I shall alway’s endeavour to appear as if I had taken the deepest draught from the...
I wrote by this evenings post and attempted to explain in a satisfactory manner our account. I shall be pleased to be informed that I have succeded, and that every article appears clear to you. You have never yet informed me whether the picture I send you was the one you saw at Bermingham or Brumigum, and whether the price I gave, was anything near what you could have obtained it for, previous...
I wrote you by Mr. Littlepage on the 4th. inst. That Letter contains an account of Cash recieved and disposed of on your account. I do not know whether I have made a just calculation of the Livrs. expended in Paris on my account, but this and every other article is submitted to your alteration. I enclose the reviews of the last Month as both your and Mr. Adams’s Names are mentioned, and have...
I did myself the honour of writing you from Harwich and Amsterdam— we have been very unfortunate as to roads & weather and were not able to reach Bresleau, time enough for the Review there— those of this place and at Potsdam will be finished about the 20 th. when I shall attempt a rapid passage to London by the way of Paris, I shudder at the Idea of tresspassing too far upon your indulgence—...
I had the honor of addressing you on the 18th. inst. in answer to your favor of the 9th. of August, since which I have received yours of the 13th. inst. Mr. A. returned here on the 7th. or 8th. He took up the subject on which you impatiently wait an answer on his arrival, a short letter on which, you must have received before this. However he is still thinking on it, and you will hear more...
After sincerely wishing you many happy returns of the season, I take the liberty of introducing Mr. Thomas L. Shippen of Philadelphia. He has many interesting and not a few amiable lines of Character, and promises fair to make a shining and respectable Character. He has sometimes appeared to me rather exposed to step on slippery and dangerous ground and risk his usefulness in future life to...
I was much pleased by the receipt of yours of the 4th. inst. to find you had arrived safe at Paris, and that the rout you took proved so agreable, as to induce you to recommend it to me, when I visit Paris. If that should ever happen again, St. Omar’s and Arras shall be visited, not only on account of your recommendation, but to indulge my natural disposition which sometimes throws me out of...
The Bearer Mr. Stewart was an officer in our troops during the war and some time under my immediate command. He proposes returning to America in the French Packet of November. Permit me to introduce him to your Excellency and recommend him to your civilities during his stay at Paris. Any Letters you may commit to his care when he departs for America will be taken care of, and he will be able...
I accidently encountered Mr: Kissam the young Gentleman who came passenger in the last Packet from New York, he having dispatches addressed to you from Mr. Jay, I opened them with an intention if I found anything in them which might be necessary for you to be immediately acquainted with, to have been the bearer of them to Portsmouth but finding they only contained letters of recall dated New...
MS unavailable. Text and reproduction of signatures from Magazine of American History with Notes and Queries , iii (1879), 44–5, where, under the title “A Diplomatic Round Robin,” the circumstances of the writing of this extempore verse are given as follows: “This amusing trifle, signed by men whom we are taught to revere as grave and reverend seniors, is in the possession of Charles Bruff, of...
I replyed fully to yours of the 9th. Ulto. on the 18th. of the same sinee which I have not had the pleasure of hearing from you. Mr. Dilley informs me the Books are shiped agreable to the inclosed Bill of Lading accompanied with the account ammounting to £25/14.0 sterg. I have also the honor of forwarding a Copy of a Letter received this morning from Mr. Barclay at Morocco of the 26th. of...
I have received yours of the 16th. Ulto. When I sent the press I gave the Gentleman who carried it a Letter for you of the 21st. of May which you do not acknowledge the receipt of, or at least but one of that date. It contained the ammount of what I gave for the press, which was 5 Guineas and 5/ for the Box = £5.10. The press shall be sent agreable to your request. I am called off, and have...
M r: Bourne has this moment waited upon me and informs, that he has been honoured by the senate with the appointment of being the Bearer of their Dispatches to you, relative to your election as Vice President of the Western Empire, upon which please to accept of my affectionate congratulations and of my sincere prayers that Heaven may guide and protect you in this great Career— The Virtuous...
I am really ashamed of myself for the total silence I have observed since my arrival in America, and am at a loss to account for it, excepting that the affairs of our Country have been in such a situation as scarcely to admit of a Letter’s being sent across the Atlantic, which touched upon their present state or future prospects. But now we are advancing to greater regularity and the period...
Some day’s after my return, I did myself the honor of writing to your Excellency; and after attempting in a few Lines to express the obligation I felt myself under to you, while at Paris, I touched on the political stage, hinted at Mr. Eden, and left the papers which accompanied it, to satisfy you more fully on the subject. I also mentioned the application made by the ministry to a Committee...
London, 18 Sep. 1787 . Introduces Benjamin Parker, nephew of Daniel Parker, a student at “Cambridge Colledge in Massachusetts,” who will spend three months in Paris before returning to America; “being hard of hearing … prevents him from seeking society with that goùt which might be expected from his age and situation.” RC ( MHi ); 2 p.; endorsed. Recorded in SJL as received 23 Sep. 1787.
We were pleased by the receipt of yours of the 5th. inst. from Harwich, to find that your jaunt to that period and place had proved so agreable, you have our earnest wishes for its continuance. But we have been apprehensive since, that the fine Sun and fair Brieze which invited you on board in the morning, forsook you before, you had crossed the Channel. At this place, the after part of the...
I have received yours of the 23d. ulto. The first printing press has been forwarded some time. Mr. Woodmason is disposed to consider himself free’d from every obligation respecting the safe conveyance of his machine to Paris. He looks upon himself acquitted on presenting the Bill of lading, and receipt of the Captain. Upon this principle, the one is forwarded and payed for. I hope no...
I wrote you last fryday’s post and by Mr. Parker on Saturday. In the former, I find I left out, on the credit side, the 2 pr. of shoes which Mr. Short paid for, amounting to 13/4, which deducted from the £1.10.7 which I make the ballance between us, reduces it to seventeen and three pence. Mr. Adam , setts off this morning for the Hague to take leave in person of their High Mightinesses and...
The request I am going to make, will perhaps at the first blush appear singular—this you’ll excuse—If improper—I shall ever acknowledge myself obliged by being candidly told so—and in this, as well as in every other matter, I will chearfully give way to your superior judgement, and regulate my conduct by your advice, as far as you think proper to honour me with it. If there is a probability of...
Your goodness will doubtless attribute my silence to a necessary attention to the duties of office, which since my arrival, have been neither few nor small . I was at a loss when I took my leave for Expressions to convey to you a proper Idea of the impression which your politeness and Hospitality had made on my mind, and now I can only thank and assure you, that while gratitude is considered a...
I have been honoured by the receipt of your friendly Letter of July the 16 th . I supposed, that on your arrival, various matters would necessarily engage your attention; we sensibly feel for the indisposition of our good Mama, and wish she was near us, that we might each take care of a finger,— previous to our being informed of these reasons of silence, we concluded, that there was some...
I have recived your agreable Letter of the 5 th. of may and am much obliged for it, at the same time I had the happiness of getting one from my dear Abby I ask your pardon Nabby you like best and when I am acquainted with what will give my friends pleasure— I shall alway’s attend even to the minutest particle—therefore to you Nabby is the word—Amelia to herself—my daughter for Sir—& for myself...
The detachment made from the british Camp mentioned in my last to Your Excellency for the purpose of suppressing certain riots and dis-orders near Huntington on Long Island, returned on the morning of the 29th Ulto, they have taken up a Number of the most respectable Inhabitants of that part of the Country—who are charged with robbery—confin’d in the Provost, and under tryal by General court...