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[ Annapolis, 29 Dec. 1783 . Entry in SJL reads: “Capt Hutchins. Vocabulary for any Indian tribes.” Not found.]
[ Paris, 24 May 1786 . Entry in SJL reads: “T. Walpole. extract from Limozin’s letter.” Letter not found, but see Limozin to TJ, 21 May 1786 .]
[ Annapolis, 1–14 Feb. 1784 . Entry in SJL under date of 1 Feb. reads: “TMR. Phaeton—buy horse for me—keep eye on two others—give notice to Key to send for him [i.e., the purchased horse]—I will call on him [i.e., Randolph] in Spring—health—[…] Judy. P.S. of Feb. 14. health—news.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 10 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “T M Randolph. Tender of service—not buy horse—sell marquee.” Not found; the marquee evidently was one acquired in late May 1781 (see Vol. 6: 20–21).]
[ Annapolis, 23 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “TMR. Garden seeds—Pitt still in and parliament not dissolved—Luzerne going—Marb[ois] charg[é] d’aff[aires].” Not found.]
[ Paris, 15 Dec. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Mr. Barclay. Receipt of letter Nov. 19.—paiment of account to Mrs. Barclay—wine and tea still unpaid and unknown. 14 ℔ tea received but not the China—my American letters inclosed to him.” Not found, but see Barclay to TJ, 17 Nov. 1784 , incorrectly noted in SJL as dated 19 Nov.]
I have duly received your favor of the 24th. Aug. and think with you there should be no contest for the duty on the candles. I shall be ready to answer it to you whenever you please. I presume you have heard that New York has acceded to the new constitution. I have the honor to be Sir Your most obedt & most humble servt, PrC ( DLC ).
[ Paris, 29 Jan. 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “Thos. Shore. Information that powers are given to treat with pyratical states but not ultimate orders.” Not found.]
Mr. Jefferson’s compliments to Mr. Rusten and begs the honor of his company to dinner on Tuesday next the 19th instant. RC (Raab Collection, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, 2018); addressed: “Monsr. Rusten Hotel d’Orleans, Palais royal”; wax seal affixed. Not recorded in SJL . According to Ruston’s diary, he dined with TJ on 19 Apr., at which time they discussed Great Britain’s trade policy ( DLC :...
[ Paris, 11 Nov. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Mr. Barclay. To send 2. casks brandy by Lemaire—write to me about China and tea and draw on me for money for those things and the wine and tea left here.” Not found, but see TJ to F. Eppes , this date, and Barclay to TJ, 17 Nov. 1784 .]
[ Paris, 7 Feb. 1786. Entry in SJL under this date, immediately under an entry for letter to Archibald Cary: “TMRandolph. do. by Lyons.” Not found.]
Congress do not grant their sea letters for the East-Indies but to ships belonging to citizens of the united states, and navigated by officers and seamen of the United states. Even the cargo must also belong to their own citizens. Nor can these letters be obtained but on an application to Congress themselves, whereupon they appoint a committee of their own body to enquire into the...
[ Annapolis, 2 Mch. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “TMR. Sailing of ratification Feb. 17—pacification of Turks and Russ.—resignation of N. and F. [North and Fox]—execution deed of Western country—ill accomodations here—phaeton—P. to Judy.” Not found.]
Your favor of Nov. 28. is now before me, and I thank you for your attention to my letters. My last news from Messrs. Short and Rutledge was of the 5th. of Dec. They were then well, at Venice, and within a day or two of their departure for Rome. Mr. and Mrs. Paradise are arrived here. I have no news from America since October. The great news of this country is the late decision of the court...
I am very sensible of the humanity and generosity which the merchants of Rochelle were so good as to interpose in behalf of the crew of the Clementina, and am very grateful for the aids they afforded. Congress have not been able as yet to make a regular appointment of Agents in the several ports of France because it is not till very lately that a Convention has been arranged for that purpose...
Your letter by Doctor Lyons has been safely delivered me. Mr. Short on his arrival here from Virginia had informed me that the young Mr. Randolphs were either gone or going to Edinburgh and since that I have received the same information from Doctor Currie in a letter. I consider that really as the best position in Europe for the acquisition of real science: and that it will be very...
I am sorry to hear, by letter from Mr. Elder, that your health is infirm, and that it is likely to become necessary on that account for yourself, your brother and cousin to remove to the continent of Europe. Edinburgh had the two advantages of possessing science in as high a degree as any place in the world, and of conveying it in your native tongue. Places may be found on the continent which...
I was honoured with your letter of Octob. 25. by Mr. Barrett: and am to thank you for an introduction to his acquaintance. The matter of the whale oil was settled before he came. I need not trouble you with the details of this however as I have written them to his Excellency Governor Bowdoin. The indulgence obtained is made temporary. I suppose this was done to give them an opportunity of...
The inclosed being part of a newspaper published here I thought you would like to see it, and therefore cut it out and inclose it. I have no doubt that the author of it has had you in view when he wrote it: and perhaps, when you return it may be worth while to see what he offers to shew. I have had conversations on your business since you left us, and find you will not be able to get a step...
[I am this moment favored with] yours of the 4th. instant. I had before received those of Sep. 17. and Dec. 11. The severity of the winter has been beyond all example in every part of France, even Marseilles. At Nice however it has been fine, and we do not learn that the cold has been remarkeable in any part of Italy. As health is your object, I should suppose there could be no question but...
Colo. Franks has occasion for money to carry him to London. As we propose that all the money for this business shall be procured by draughts on Mr. Adams, will it not be better for you to draw on him at present for enough to cover the last journey of Colo. Franks, to defray the present one, to pay for the articles to be purchased here, the expences of the future journey Southwardly &c.? All...
After the letter I did myself the honour of writing you to assure you that I would reimburse you the necessary expences for sending young Mercier to his own country, I took occasion in my first to the Governor of Virginia to mention your attention to him, and my undertaking, and to pray that he would endeavor to find out his family. I now receive a letter from the present governor , Mr....
Je m’empresse, Mademoiselle, de faire reponse à la lettre que vous me faites l’honneur de m’ecrire au sujet de Monsieur Blaine, et de vous observer que la meilleure partie à prendre, à ce qui me paroit, c’est d’écrire à Monsieur Barclay qui se trouve actuellement à Philadelphie. C’est probable que Monsieur Blaine y est aussi, et assurèment Monsieur Barclay fera son mieux pour vous faire payer...
Colo. Franks arrived some days ago with the Marocco treaty, and with your dispatches. I am persuaded they will give great satisfaction to Congress, and do you honor in their eyes. Colo. Franks waits for his baggage which he hourly expects. He will then proceed to London and from thence to New York. He carries duplicate ratifications of the treaty from me, which being also signed by Mr. Adams,...
In a former letter to Mr. Rutledge I suggested to him the idea of extending his tour to Constantinople, and in one of to-day I mention it again. I do not know how far that extension may accord with your plan, nor indeed how far it may be safe for either of you. For, tho’ it has been thought there has been a relaxation in the warlike dispositions of the belligerent powers, yet we have no...
I am honoured with your favor of Aug. 13. and shall always be glad to render you any service I can in your commerce and to hear of your success. Supposing that it may be interesting to you to be well informed on the question of war and peace, I take the liberty of informing you that tho’ the affairs of the Dutch had left hopes of accomodation, yet that the commencement of a war between the...
On my return from a tour through the Southern parts of France and Northern of Italy, I found here the present of books you had been so kind as to send me. I should value them highly for their intrinsic merit, but much more as coming from you. You will have seen that at length one of our republics has experienced those commotions which the newspapers have been always ascribing to all of them. I...
I received last night from Mr. Trumbull the account of the books you had sent me. The books themselves had arrived some time before. Among those not yet purchased you note Chandler’s debates at £9–9. I am glad you have not purchased it at that price, and will beg the favor of you to strike it out of my list altogether. I note below some others to be added to my list. I will thank you to send...
Your favour of April 14. 1787. gave me reason to hope we should have seen you here this winter. That being nearly passed over I am apprehensive you may have changed your plan. Or perhaps you have chosen first to finish those courses of lectures which are to make a part of your education. This is certainly wise, but I hope you will not be diverted altogether from your purpose of coming here. I...
The inclosed are part of some papers I wrote in answer to certain queries sent me by Monsr. de Marbois in 1781. Another foreigner of my acquaintance, now beyond the water, having asked a copy of them, I undertook to revise and correct them in some degree. There are still a great number of facts defective and some probably not to be depended on. Knowing nobody so able as yourself to set me...