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The Day after my last Letter to you of the 14 Inst. was written, Mr Benson informed me that measures were taking by Congress for your accommodation, and I since learn that every thing necessary on that Head has been done. This Circumstance cannot fail of being agreable to You, and for that Reason, as well as the Propriety which marks it, I cannot regret it; tho’ it will deprive me of a...
The Day after my last Letter to you of the 14 Inst. was written, M r Benson informed me that measures were taking by Congress for your accommodation, and I since learn that every thing necessary on that Head has been done. This Circumstance cannot fail of being agreable to You, and for that Reason, as well as the Propriety which marks it, I cannot regret it; tho’ it will deprive me of a...
On my Return last Evening from a Fortnights absence in the country, I was informed that proper arrangements for your immediate accommodation were not yet made. Permit me therefore to take the Liberty of requesting the Favor of You to be with me in the mean Time; and if Mrs Washington should accompany you, we should be still more happy. As the measures which were in contemplation on this...
On my Return last Evening from a Fortnight’s Absence in the Country, I was informed that proper arrangements for your immediate accommodation were not yet made. Permit me therefore to take the Liberty of requesting the Favor of you to be with me in the mean Time; and if M rs . Washington should accompany you, we should be still more happy. As the Measures that were in contemplation on this...
Among other Letters w h . I have had the pleasure of rec g . from you, there is one of the 27 th Aug t . Aug last, in which at the Request of the Chargé des affaires of the Court palatine and of Bavaria, you inclosed a Memorial & Contract to be conveyed to Congress, & thro’ them to the Governm t . of Pennsylvania, in order to obtain Justice for a palatine Subject from a Person settled at...
Since the thirteenth Day of September nine States have not been represented in Congress, and since the tenth Day of October last a sufficient Number for ordinary Business have not convened. No Progress therefore could be made in the Affairs of this Department, and that will continue to be the Case unless the Government shall be organized. Many Members of the new Congress are now here, but not...
Reflecting that our wishes to see you here, would probably soon be gratified, it occurred to me that if you inclined to have of the Spanish Breed of Horses, it would be but little Trouble for one of your Servants to bring up some mares to put to my Horse. I take the Liberty therefore of mentioning this Circumstance—the mares on arriving here, shall be immediately sent to my Farm, where proper...
Reflecting that our Wishes to see you here, would probably soon be gratified, it occurred to me that if you inclined to have of the spanish Breed of Horses, it would be but little Trouble for one of your Servants to bring up some mares to put to my Horse— I take the Liberty therefore of mentioning this Circumstance— The mares on arriving here, shall be immediately sent to my Farm, where proper...
I was a few Days ago honored with yours of the 13 of last Month. It contains much important Information, and there is Reason to regret that the fœderal Governm t . is not so circumstanced as not to be in Capacity to take the Measures which their affairs require. A Sufficient Number of Delegates to form a Congress not being convened, I thought it my Duty to consult those who are here, on the...
Having read in the Papers of to Day, an Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in France to one at Boston, mentioning an Edict excluding foreign whale Oil, I waited on the minister of France to be informed whether he had rec d. official Information of it. He told me he had not.— We had much Conversation on the subject, and from it I was led to conclude, that he did not think it improbable that...
Your Recommendation adds to increases the number of considerations which induce me to wish well to D r . Rodgers, for your Judgment relative to him as a Man and as a Physician cannot fail to have great Influence and will cooperate with my Regard for his worthy father to do him friendly offices. It will I assure you give me pleasure to cultivate the ^an^ acquaintance with your amiable friend M...
Having read in the Papers of to Day, an Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in France to one at Boston, mentioning an Edict excluding foreign whale oil, I waited on the minister of France to be informed whether he had rec d . official Information of it. He told me he had not.— we had much Conversation on the Subject, and from it I was led to conclude, that he did not think it improbable that...
You will recieve this at a Moment, when you will again find yourself surrounded by your amiable Family— it is a pleasing Circumstance, and I congratulate you on the occasion. We are much obliged to M rs . Adams for having honored us tho for a little while with her Company— it has confirmed the Esteem which her Character had inspired.— If wishes were not vain, I should wish you all well settled...
M rs Jay having been informed by a Gentleman who lately passed thro one of your Towns, (I think Wallingford) that good Silks were manufactured there, desires me to request the Favor of You, if [ illegible ] ^there be any for sale,^ to procure the ^a^ Pattern of a Gown and Petticoat, of some grave quaker Color, and send it to her. I am persuaded that the same motive which induces her to wish to...
New York, 15 Dec. 1788. Introduces the bearer, “Mr. Johnston, a citizen of this state, and a Member of a worthy and respectable Family in it,” who is sailing to Lisbon, “and ‘tho not determined to go on from thence to France, thinks it probable that he may visit it before his Return. My Respect for his Family, and good opinion with which his Character has impressed me, induce me to recommend...
Instead of presenting a particular account against the State for my Services as one of their agents to manage their Controversy with Massachusetts, and as one of their Delegates in Congress, I shall only state Facts, and submit it to the Legislature to make such order on the Subject, as may be most consistant with their Sense and Construction of the Laws respecting it. In order to be at...
on considering the Nature and necessity of the Extra Expences with which You think the united States should be charged, I was inclined to believe that Congress would view them in the same point of Light, and give orders accordingly. Altho’ none of these existing Acts, strictly construed, warrant such Charges, yet the Reasonableness & Propriety of them afford strong Reasons for their being...
My last to you was dated the 23d. September last. It mentioned my having received your Letters of 4th. 23d. and 30th. May. I have since been favored with four others, vizt. 29th. July and 3d. 10th. and 11th. August with the Papers mentioned to be enclosed. They have not been laid before Congress, although I transmitted them to the President for that Purpose; for a sufficient Number of Members...
On considering the nature and necessity of the Extra Expences with which You think the united States should be charged, I was inclined to believe that Congress would view them in the same point of Light, and give orders accordingly. Altho’ none of their existing Acts, strictly construed, warrant such charges, yet the Reasonableness and Propriety of them afford strong Reasons for their being...
I have the honor of informing you that it as Congress think ^have deemed^ it expedient in the present situation of affairs, to refer their negociations depending between ^with^ his Cath.[olic] Maj[esty] & the un States to the fœderal Government, which is to assemble in March next. as the Propriety of this measure is derived from the ^ that ^ Inconveniences which attend The dissolution of one...
I have had the Honor of rec g & communicating to Congress your Letter of the 29 April last, as well as your former one preceding ones of 3 July & 19th Aug t . The Intelligence which accompanied the first of the two last is relative from our unfortunate Captives at Algiers is interesting, and there doubtless was propriety in your forwarding it to this office. As to all Questions as to the Paper...
My last to you was dated the 9th. June, since which I have been honored with yours of the 4th. 23d. and 30th. May last, which with the Papers that accompanied them were communicated to Congress. Two Copies of the Ratification of Mr. Adams last Contract have been transmitted to you, under Cover to Messrs. Willinks and Van Staphorsts, by Vessels bound to Amsterdam. A Triplicate will be enclosed...
Your Ideas relative to the Diffusion of Intelligence and useful Information by means of news Papers and the Press, appear to me exceedingly just; nor do I percieve any good Objection to preferring the Stages to Post Riders for the Transportation of the Mail, on the contrary I think the Ballance of Advantages is clearly in favor of the former. How far it was the Duty of the Post office to...
Your Ideas relative to the Diffusion of Intelligence and useful Information by means of news Papers and the Press, appear to me exceedingly just; nor do I percieve any good Objection to preferring the Stages to Post Riders for the Transportation of the mail, on the contrary I think the Ballance of advantages is clearly in favor of the former. How far it was the Duty of the Post office to...
The Secretary of the United States for the Department of foreign Affairs, to whom was referred his letter of 3 d . Instant with the Affidavit of Leonard White Outerbridge, respecting the Importation of Convicts from the Island of New Providence to Maryland &c: Reports. That the Facts stated in this Affidavit render it in his Opinion highly probable, that the Persons brought to and landed at...
On the 12 th . October last Congress was pleased, on a Report from the Board of Treasury, to resolve that the Balance of the Appropriation for the Barbary Treaties of the 14 th . February 1785 not then applied to that Object, be constituted a Fund for redeeming the American Captives at Algiers, and that the same be for that Purpose subject to the Direction of the Minister of the United States...
The Secretary of the United States for the Department of foreign Affairs, to whom was referred a Motion of the Honorable the Delegates of North Carolina in the Words following, Viz ts . “Whereas many Citizens of the United States who possess Lands on the Western Waters, have expressed much Uneasiness from a Report that Congress are disposed to treat with Spain for the Surrender of their Claim...
The Society in this City for promoting the Manumission of Slaves & c . were much pleased to find that you was a Member of a Similar one at Paris. They have admitted you an Honorary Member of theirs, and I they will be happy sincerely wish that your Success ^generous^ Exertions in the Cause of Liberty ^Freedom^ & Humanity may continue to be crowned with Success— With Sentiments of real Esteem &...
accept my thanks for the obliging Letter which you did me the Honor to write on the 8 May last by Mons r . de Varville It gives me Pleasure to find that the Talents and attention ^zeal^ you manifested in the Conduct of affairs ^in Spain^ during a very interesting Period in Spain , have procured as well as merited the Rank you now enjoy— M r De Varville shall recieve from me all those Marks of...
Poughkeepsie, New York, July 26, 1788. “We the members of the Convention of this State, have deliberately & maturely considered the Constitution proposed for the united States. Several articles in it appear so exceptionable [to a majority of us], that nothing but the fullest confidence of obtaining a Revision of them by a general convention, and an invincible Reluctance to separating from our...
We the members of the Convention of this State, have deliberately and maturely considered the Constitution proposed for the united States. Several articles in it appear so exceptionable ^ to a majority of us ,^ that nothing but the fullest Confidence in of obtaining a Revision of them by a general Convention, and an invi[n]cible Reluctance to separating from our Sister States could have...
proposition of Yesterday read Jay rises—not to debate— yesterday gave the fullest Assurances that they meant to go hand in hand with us—& produces draft [of] a letter intended to be sent to the several states—… Jay— not very anctious—is willing to have it expressed as strongly as possible— even expressly reserving all the rights not granted in the constitution— AD , N : Gilbert Livingston ( EJ...
Jay— Most ardently wishes & hopes the business might be so carried thro’—it is no more a paper—but it is a government— let us be Unanimous in pursuing the Object—to get a convention—to reconsider the constitution thinks Gen t [lemen]. are at liberty to consider the circumstances that we are in— he himself wishes some amendments as well as others— wishes we may go hand in hand—to obtain them— …...
I wrote to you a few Days ago and inclosed a copy of certain Propositions, or mode of adoption—great objections to it being urged it was withdrawn for the present —The Convention proceeded to Day in debating on the Plan of conditional amendment. some of the anti Party moved for striking out the words on Condition and substituting the words in full confidence —it was carried 31 to 29 in the...
I wrote to you a few Days ago and enclosed a Copy of certain Propositions, or mode of adoption— great objections to it being urged it was withdrawn for the present — The Convention proceeded to Day in debating on the Plan of conditional amendment, some of the anti Party moved for striking out the word on Condition and substituting the words in full Confidence — It was carried 31 to 29 in the...
[ JJ seconds Melancton Smith’s motion for an amendment for an eight-year presidential term not subject to reelection. ] Jay— this amend[men] t . does not leave him sufficiently independent—… Jay— will not press— hardly knows how to chuse difficulties on every hand— A Gov[ernmen] t . as it was called operated in this state 20 Years ago— The Legislature & Gov r . play d into each others hands—...
M r . Jay Standing Troops will be enlisted during the war—If they have command of the Mil[iti] a & want 20.000. they may raise 10.000 & depend upon 10.000 Militia— If you limit them they may be under a diff[icult]y— If they must call the Legisl[atur] e . it will. More safe, as it will prevent the necessity of standing Armies— Confidence for national affairs in nat[ional] gov[ernmen] t —for...
[A committee discusses the draft of Melancton Smith’s conditional ratification proposal that included a bill of rights and other proposed amendments. JJ regarded Smith’s proposal limiting Congress’s exercise of certain powers until a convention was held to consider amendments as “less evil than the former” and as providing a basis to proceed. On the 19th, entering the debate on the bill of...
Since my arrival here I have written you two or three hasty Letters— being constantly involved in Business or Company from w h . it would not be here very practicable or perhaps prudent to retreat. I have been able to write but very little— The Convention this moment adjourned and I am now writing in their Chamber. a Question being about to be put on the mode of adoption which you have seen,...
Since my arrival here I have written you two or three hasty letters—being constantly involved in Business or Company from wh. it would not be here very practicable or perhaps prudent to retreat, I have been able to write but very little—The Convention this moment adjourned and I am writing in their Chamber—a Question being about to be put on the mode of adoption which you have seen, we moved...
Jay— no difficulty—first take a vote &c a as Ham[ilton]—… Jay— cannot be before us till after the quest n —… Jay— out of order—quest n . must be first taken on the Resolution—… Jay— thinks the Gen t . is in order— he thinks we should adj[our] n —& wants to give his reasons— the state—is this— A mode of adoption is on the table— we think it would be injurious & therefore wish an adj[ournmen] t...
[ JJ joined the debate in support of John Sloss Hobart’s motion for adjournment, urging the delegates to return home and consult their constituents about the changed situation. The motion to adjourn is defeated.] The hon. Judge Hobart brought forward a motion for adjournment. On this motion large debates took place, in which Mr. Hobart , Mr. Duane , Mr. Lansing , Jr. Jay , the Chancellor , Mr....
Jay— ment[io] ns a few reasons [for adjournment]— Lans g . supposes it would increase heats— some weight at first sight— this will depend on the temper with which we go home— if we go with an intention to investigate—it will have a different effect— the southern [counties] wish an adoption unlimited— the North wish conditions— if we go home and carry the proper information from both...
M r . Jay. Have not misapp[lie] d .— the levying of taxes in a diff[eren] t . way—&— the hands of Congress tied— Congress will have no power to suspend any power—^[ in margin ] how have they power to accept?^ how can they lay taxes on other State and not on others— tie hands of Congress, when said they will not exercise them— a rejection under another name— ride to N.Y or go afoot— black coat...
Jay— It must be evident from the prop[osition] s — that they wish to accommodate—& pledge themselves to endeavor an Amend[men] t — does not this weigh—to unite all our force— is it not certain that the cond[ition] s . will render our admittance into the Union uncertain— all has been said, that can be—that the cond[ition] s . will amount to a rejection—declare that they think it will destroy...
M r . Jay We are endeavouring to agree— Gen t See we have brot forth valuable Amendm ts . Cannot the Conditional Amendments be paired down so that we may agree We honestly think Congress must reject such an Adoption—Cannot we endeavour further to Accommodate— The Gentlemen have advanced for Accomodation— We have now advanced for Accommodat[ion]. AD , NHi : McKesson’s notes ( EJ : 13422 ); DHRC...
[Melancton Smith moved to amend John Jay’s motion for ratification to have the Constitution ratified on condition that a convention be called to recommend amendments and until then limiting the service of militia outside the state, and barring Congress from regulating the time, place, and manner of elections, or levying excise taxes on American products, except liquors, or direct taxes without...
M r . Jay. Went to the Committee disposed to accomd n .—pro[position] s . were received dictated— These not comm[ende] d . as a Basis of agreem t . AD , N : Melancton Smith’s notes; DHRC John P. Kaminski, Gaspare J. Saladino, Richard Leffler, Charles H. Schoenleber, and Margaret A. Hogan, eds. Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution (28 vols. to date; Madison, Wis., 1976–)
[On 10 July Lansing proposed a threefold scheme of amendments: 1) explanatory; 2) conditional; and 3) recommendatory, and followed with a proposal that an informal committee of both parties make accommodations to reach a quick decision. JJ was named to a committee of fourteen, but since Antifederalist members insisted on conditional amendments and he would not accept a form of ratification...
M r . Jay A proposition That the Constitution should be so far ratified as to go into Operation except as to certain parts which should not operate until a Convention Not admissable It called on Congress to admit this State into Congress upon Conditions not contained in that Constitution Could this have been admitted What Powers will this Congress have— Can they change any Article of it— Will...