You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jay, John
  • Period

    • Confederation Period

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jay, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 1-50 of 455 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
19 July 1783 D r . Franklin told me that not long after the elder Lewis Morris (who was once chief Justice of NYork) came to the Governmt. of NJersey, he involved himself in a Dispute with the assembly of that Province—the Doct r . (who was then a printer at Ph a .) went to Burlington while the assembly was sitting there, & were engaged in the Dispute with their Gov r .—the House had referred...
AD : Columbia University Library Dr. Franklin lived at Pha. in the Neighbourhood of Mr Boudinot the Father of Elias Boudinot the present Presidt. of Congress—the Father was a Silver Smith who had come from NYork to settle at Pha., a man much devoted to Whitfield, by whom his Son was baptized Elias after the Prophet of that Name— Dr. Franklin remembers Elias coming to his Father’s Door with...
Copies: Public Record Office, William L. Clements Library, Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society, National Archives; press copy of copy: National Archives; copies of draft: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society We have received the Letter which you did us the Honour to write yesterday. Your friendly Congratulations on the signature of the definitive Treaty, meet...
I have been fav d . with Your’s of the 22 Ult.— The Day before Yesterday, the definitive Treaties were signed—our’s is in the words of the provisional Articles, so that commercial Regulations remain yet to be formed. The Account you give me respecting a certain Scheme shall be transmitted—and I hope Care will be taken to put a Stop to such practices for the future— I think ^ & feel ^ exactly...
Copies: Massachussetts Historical Society, Library of Congress We have the honour of transmitting herewith enclosed an Extract of a Resolution of Congress of the 1. May last, which we have Just recd. You will perceive from it that we may daily expect a Commission in due Form, for the Purposes mentioned in it, and we assure you of our Readiness to enter upon the Business, whenever you may think...
LS and press copy of LS : National Archives; copies: Library of Congress, Massachusetts Historical Society On the third Instant, Definitive Treaties were concluded, between all the late belligerent Powers, except the Dutch, who the Day before settled and signed Preliminary Articles of Peace with Britain. We most sincerely & cordially congratulate Congress and our Country in general, on this...
AL (draft): Columbia University Library I have been favored with your Letter of Yesterday, & will answer it explicitly— I have no Reason whatever to believe that you was averse to our obtaining the full Extent of Boundary & Fishery secured to us by the Treaty.— Your Conduct respecting them throughout the Negociation indicated a strong & steady attachment to both those objects, & in my opinion...
I have been favored with your Letter of Yesterday, and will answer it explicitly. I have never been witness to any Action or Conversation of yours which indicated a Reluctance ^ [ illegible ] ^ ^ have no Reason whatever to believe that you was averse ^ to our obtaining the full Extent of Boundary & Fishery secured to us by the Treaty.— ^ but your Conduct respecting them throughout the...
Is it not almost Time for me to expect a Letter from ^ You? ^ —the one enclosing Letters of Att y was the last of yours that have reached me . M rs. Jay gave me another Daughter last Month, & you are its ^ her ^ Godfather— I hope next Summer to introduce her to You.— Do my dear Friend
The Definitive Treaty is concluded, and we are now thank God in the full Possession of Peace & Independence—if we are not a happy People now it will be our own Fault. We daily expect the Commission for a Treaty of Commerce. I wish ^ that ^ the Sentiments of our Country on that important Subject may ^ be ^ fully stated in the Instructions w h . will accompany it. I think all our Treaties of...
At your Farm, with your Family, in Peace, and in Plenty, how happy is your Situation! I wish you may not have retired too soon. It is certain you may do much good where you are, & perhaps in few Things more; than in impressing by Precept Influence and Example the indispensable necessity of rendering the continental and State Governments more vigorous and orderly— Europe hears much, and wishes...
M r . Thaxter, who returns unspoiled, is the Bearer of the definitive Treaty, and will deliver you this. M r Hartley expects soon to confer with us about Commerce, & says he is persuaded that Britain will be liberal. I should not doubt it, if it was certain that the United States could and would act like one Nation— I think all our commercial Treaties should observe exact Reciprocity— M r...
The Sight of y r friendly Letter of the 25 of July last, an of & of those it recommends, gave me much Pleasure. Marks of Remembrance from old Acquaintances, & the Society of [ deserving ?] fellow fellow Citizens in a foreign country, excite agreable Sensations. I have as yet met with neither men nor things on this Side ^ of the water ^ which abate my Prediliction or if you please my Prejudices...
Mr. Carter lately delivered to me your friendly letter of the 25 July last. You was always of the Number of those whom I esteemed, and your Correspondence would have been both interesting & agreable. I had heard of your marriage, and it gave me Pleasure, as well because it added to your Happiness, as because it tended to fix your Residence in a State of which I long wished you to be and remain...
M r . Carter lately delivered to me your friendly letter of the 25 th July last. You was always of the Number of those whom I esteemed, and your Correspondence would have been both interesting & agreable. I had heard of ^ your ^ marriage, and it gave me Pleasure, as well because it added to your Happiness, as because it tended to fix your residence in a State, of which I long wished you to be...
I have had the Pleasure of recieving your Letters of the 15 & 17 th . Instant, & thank You for them. Since my arrival here I have written twice to You—one of those Letters informed You of my having been taken ill of a Dysentery, & of my being then far recovered.— All Remains of that Disorder are now removed; and I find myself as well as when I left You. I have consulted Doct r . Warren (the...
I have rec d ., and am pleased with, your Letter of the 16 Instant—it is well written as to Matter and Stile, and tolerably as to hand writing and spelling—in both of which however—there is still Room for Improvement. You will learn from my Letters to your Aunt, that I have been sick, and that I am recovered. As you say nothing of your own Health, I presume it is good, and you have my best...
My last to you was dated the 26 Inst. and committed to the Care of Col. Wadsworth who set out for Paris this Morning—as it enclosed one for Peter I omit writing to him at present. Yesterday M r Adams delivered to me your Favor of the 19 Inst. enclosing Locks of Your own and our Children’s Hair, which I shall endeavour to have wrought in the best Manner. As yet I have seen so little of London...
Accept my Thanks for your obliging Letter of the 27 Ult. which I should have answered last post, but was then much indisposed—unfortunately I have not had a well Day since my arrival—for I had no sooner recovered of a Dysentery, than a sore Throat succeeded. I suspect that abby’s Elopem t . was not resolved upon in a sober moment—it was a Measure for which I cannot concieve of a Motive— I had...
I have been here a month, & well only two Days—first a bloody flux, & now a sore throat— I came in Quest of health, but seek & you shall find does not it seems always extend to that of the Body. The Parliam t . is sitting. The Kings Speech & its Echos, you will see in the papers— in my opin I have not had any Conversation on politics with either of the ministers—in my opinion no plan or System...
However my Letters may be short and unentertaining, you will I am sure give me Credit for Punctuality, especially if you recieve as many from the Post office as I send to it— The last I had the Pleasure of recieving from You was dated the 4 th . Inst— As M r Johnson lives at the Distance of three miles from me, I think it w d . be best to direct your Letters to me at M r . Binghams N o . 30,...
I wrote to you by the last Post, and also by M r Barry, who set out for Paris Yesterday— Those Letters express my concern at your Silence, & therefore will perhaps excite some unpleasant Emotions— M r Laurens gave me your kind & agreable Letter of the 6 th . Inst. Yesterday— I sincerely thank You for it— M r Laurens was detained above a Week at Calais, waiting for proper weather & c :— Similar...
[ Bath, England, November 28, 1783. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from Mr. Jay …” to H, Columbia University Libraries. Jay had gone to Europe in January, 1780, as Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain. In June, 1782, he went to Paris to serve as one of the commissioners to negotiate peace with Great Britain. The definitive peace treaty was signed in Paris on September 3, 1783, and in...
Last night I rec d. your obliging Favor of the 7 Inst. & the Letters mentioned to be enclosed with it— The one for M r Laurens was immediately sent to his Lodgings. The Circumstances you mention are interesting, and will afford matter for Deliberation & Comments when we meet. My Return to London will depend on one of two Things Viz t. on being satisfied that I am to expect little or no Benefit...
Last night I rec d . your obliging Favor of the 7 Inst. & the Letters mentioned to be enclosed with it— The one for M r Laurens was immediately sent to his Lodgings. The Circumstances you mention are interesting, and will afford matter for Deliberation & Comments when we meet. My Return to London will depend on one of two things viz t . on being satisfied that I am to expect little or no...
I arrived here from Bath Yesterday afternoon, for the Purpose of settling affairs with the Ex[ecuto] rs of M rs . Peloquin. as I have not yet seen those Gentlemen, I cannot at present say any Thing on that Subject. Sometime ago I rec d from Fred k . an Instrument of writing appointing Persons to appraise the Farm at Rye; I executed it, and sent it to S r . Jam s ., that he might do the like, &...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; AL (draft): Columbia University Library Since we parted I have been so much & so long indisposed as that (except short Letters to Mrs. Jay) I have denied myself the Pleasure of writing to my Friends. The Kindness you have shewn us both, has nevertheless not been forgotten, nor has my Disposition to acknowledge and be influenced by it in the least abated....
Since we parted I have been so much & so long indisposed as that (except short letters to M rs . Jay) I have denied myself the Pleasure of writing to my Friends. The Kindness you have shewn us both, has nevertheless not been forgotten, nor has my Disposition to acknowledge and be influenced by it in the least abated. We have lately had a Report here that you was very ill with the Stone, and...
The number of this Letter will convince you that the long Interval in which you rec d . no Letters from me, is to be ascribed to causes not in my Power to obviate. Your Favors of the 11 and 14 th . Inst. were delivered to me Yesterday, together with two from Peter, to whom I already owed two Letters— My approbation of your Proposal to inoculate the Children, was conveyed in three different...
Your letter of the 12 th . October: was delivered to me in England at a time when I was so ill, as to write only to M rs . Jay— That Circumstance and the Constant Expectation of receiving the Letter you intended to write when the Appraisement you was making of my Effects should be finished, but which I have not yet rec d ., are the Causes which have delayed my writing to you since.— It is not...
D r. Franklin informs me, that in your Passage from England to Holland, you experienced many more difficulties than are common even at this rigid Season. Mine from Dover to Calais, was far from being short or pleasant. Neptune however was less uncivil to me than to You— Neither of us have enjoyed much of his favor: but I will forgive him with all my Heart, if he will let me pass once more in...
Your Letter of the 25 Sep. came to my Hands in England on the 8 Dec r last, and since my Return I have rec d yours that of the 7 Nov. w h . tho containing only three Lines I prefer to most of y r . others Letters —perhaps you have forgot it “It is now within three minutes of the Time when the mail is made up & sent of[f]. I cannot therefore do more than just to assure you of the Continuance of...
It was not until the last week that your Fav r . of the 24 Nov r . last reached me. I was ^ am glad to ^ find it dated at Ph a ., as that Circumstance leads me to suppose that you was again serving our Country in Congress— It is of the last Importance that our federal Head should constantly possess both Wisdom & Power
In whatever Point of Light our two Countries may in future view each other, or whatever System of Politics may prevail in either, I always ^ shall ^ continue to consider you as one to whom who merits my Esteem as a public Man, and my acknowledgments as a Friend. I regret my leaving England without having seen ^ had an opportunity of bidding ^ you farewell, and the more ^ so ^ as it is not
In the Price I paid you for my Picture & the Copy to be paid made of ^ of it ^ for M r Bingham, I find on Recoll n that no Provision was made for the Frame of the Latter ^ To supply that omission ^ I now therefore enclose
Your letter of 21 st , January was delivered to me this morning. It is painful to say disagreeable things to any person, and especially to those with whom one has lived in habits of friendship; but candor on this occasion forbids reserve. You was of the number of those who possessed my esteem, and to whom I was attached. To me personally you have never given offense; but, on the contrary, I am...
Your Favor of the 4 Nov r . last found me in England; where tho I suffered much Sickness, I left the Pain in my Breast; but a sore throat I caught there, still remains obstinate & troublesome. The Resolution of Congress of 1 st . Oct r . last did not reach me until in December on my Return here last Month, I wrote in Pursuance of it, to M r Carmichael to come here without Delay, with the Books...
We had the honor of receiving your Favour of the 20 th: Inst, and are persuaded that the Communication of the Friendly Disposition of his Prussian Majesty made to you by the Baron de Thuilemeyer will give great Pleasure to Congress. The Respect with which the Reputation of that great Prince has impress’d the United States, early induced them to consider his Friendship as a desirable Object;...
LS : Massachusetts Historical Society We had the honor of receiving your Favour of the 20th. Inst, and are persuaded that the Communication of the Friendly Disposition of his Prussian Majesty made to you by the Baron de Thuilemeyer will give great Pleasure to Congress. The Respect with which the Reputation of that great Prince has impress’d the United States, early induced them to consider his...
AD : Columbia University Library Doctr Franklin, who has lived long & much with Quakers, tells me that he thinks the far greater part of them approve of defensive tho not of offensive War— In the Course of the War wh. ended in 1748, It was thought necessary to erect a Battery at Pha. & a Lottery was made to defray part of the Expence— At that Time the Doctr. was of a fire Company of thirty...
Had your Favor of the 27 th . Ult. been delivered to me a little sooner, an answer to it might have gone by this ^ to- ^ Days post; but that not having been the Case, this Letter will remain some Days in the Office. I am much obliged to you for communicating what passed between you and M r Stephens respecting the Letter he suppo sed ^ ses ^ to have rec d
To all to whom these Presents shall come or may concern, I John Jay Esq formerly of the City of New ^ York ^ in America, ^ Esq r . ^ but ^ but ^ now residing at Chaillot near Paris in France Send Greeting Whereas in the month of Dec r
M r . Carm. was 9 days going from Madrid to Bayonne, from whence he wrote to me on 12 March & arrived at Paris 27 March 1784 — Mr Barclay arr d ^ Sunday ^ 11 Ap. 1784— I gave Notice of it same Day to M r Carmich l .— — Monday 12 ap— M r Carm. call d on me in his Way to passy where he dines—is to see Barclay, & call in the Ev
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: William L. Clements Library We have now the Pleasure of acquainting you, that the Ratification of the Definitive Treaty is arrived here by an Express from Congress. You have already been informed that the Severity of the Winter in America, which hindred Travelling, had occasion’d a Delay in the assembling of the States. As soon as a sufficient Number...
We have now the Pleasure of acquainting you, that the Ratification of the Definitive Treaty is arrived here by an Express from Congress. You have already been informed that the Severity of the Winter in America, which hindered Travelling had occasioned a delay in the assembling of the States. As soon as a sufficient Number were got together, the Treaty was taken into Consideration, and the...
A Letter in Sec y Thompson’s Hand writing directed to the American Ministers for Peace, & [ illegible ] ^ & hinting ^ the Expediency of of an Article for extending the Term assigned by the Treaty for the Exchange of Ratifications, arrived last Month & was communicated to me by D r . Franklin— shortly afterwards we were both confined, he by the Gout & I by the Rheumatism— on at the first ^...
I had last Evening the Pleasure of recieving your Favor of the 27 th . Ult— I congratulate You on your safe arrival, & sincerely wish that the same good Fortune may attend your Return. While our Country remained part of the british Empire, there was no Impropriety in solliciting the Aid of our distant Brethren and fellow Subjects, for any liberal and public purpose. it was natural that the...
On the 5 th . Inst. M r Norris gave me your obliging letter of the 26 Sept r . last. I regret that he did not come here sooner, for it will always give me Pleasure to have opportunities of evincing my Esteem & Regard for you, by attentions to those who possess yours. M r Carmichael whom I had long expected with the public accounts did not arrive until the 27 th . ult—when M r Ridley had just...
I thank You for your obliging Letter of the 2 d. Inst—& congratulate you on the Recovery of your Health, as well as on the Success of your measures for preserving our Credit, for which you certainly merit the Acknowledgm ts. of the United States in general, and of their Financier in particular. It seems to me that this Climate would be at least as propitious to your Health as that of Holland;...
ALS and copy: National Archives; press copy of ALS : Library of Congress We duly received the Letters your Excellency did us the honour of writing to us the 14th of January by Colonel Harmar & Lieut. Col. David Franks, with the Ratification of the Definitive Treaty, the Proclamation, & the Recommendatory Resolves of Congress. On the Arrival of Col. Harmar, we immediately wrote to Mr Hartley,...