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Documents filtered by: Author="Jackson, William" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I beg leave to inform your Excellency that I purpose embarking for Europe on board the Packet, which will sail in the beginning of next week. Should my presence in France or England capacitate a service for your Excellency, I shall hope the honor of being charged with your commands. My best attention to whatever you may be pleased to request will mark, I hope, in some degree, the warm...
I am honored, my dear General, with your very flattering, and highly esteemed letter, enclosing one for the Marquis de la Fayette, and another for Doctor Franklin. Words will not do justice to my sense of the favor, which your goodness has conferred—An earnest endeavor to merit the opinion you have been pleased to express—and the grateful sentiments of an obliged mind are the best returns and...
AL : American Philosophical Society Major Jackson begs leave to present his most respectful compliments to Doctor Franklin— He regrets that particular business obliges him to debark in England, as it will delay the happiness which he hopes to enjoy in the honor of renewing his acquaintance with his Excellency. Major Jackson presents himself with respect and affection to Mr. W. T. Franklin. Mr....
I am directed by the Pennsylvania State Society of the Cincinnati to inform you, that the diplomas which were signed by you, and intended for our State Society, were lost in the transmission from Mount Vernon to Baltimore—and I am likewise directed to request that you would be pleased to point out such mode, as may be most acceptable to yourself, to obtain the recovery of them. It would seem...
In obedience to an order of the Pennsylvania State Society of the Cincinnati, I do myself the honor to transmit Two hundred and fifty diplomas for your Excellency’s signature. Availing ourselves of General Knox’s presence in Philadelphia—we presumed to request that he would countersign the diplomas before they were sent to you—and, in order to secure the safe transmission of them, Captain...
It was not till last evening I discovered that a packet, which I had done myself the honor to address to you by a private conveyance, had been forgotten by the person to whom it was entrusted. To prevent a similar accident, and to avoid any farther delay, I take the liberty to forward the enclosed pamphlets (which are transmitted at the request of our State Society) by post. Unable to decline,...
In obedience to a resolve of the Standing-Committee of the Pennsylvania Society of the Cincinnati, we do ourselves the honor to inform your Excellency that your circular letter of the 31st of October last, addressed to the President of our State-Society, was laid before the Committee at their last meeting. They desire to communicate their respectful thanks for the early information which you...
Flattered by the opinions of some of my friends, who have expressed a wish that I would offer myself a Candidate for the Office of Secretary to the fœderal Convention—I presume to communicate to you my intention—and to request (so far as you shall deem it consonant with the more important interests of the Public) your influence in procuring me the honor of that appointment. To say more on this...
Major Jackson presents his most respectful compliments to General Washington—He begs leave to request his signature to forty Diplomas intended for the Rhode Island Society of the Cincinnati. Major Jackson, after burning all the loose scraps of paper which belong to the Convention, will this evening wait upon the General with the Journals and other papers which their vote directs to be...
In answering a correspondence, which was at once my pleasure and my boast, I will not wrong my belief of your goodness by offering an apology for the freedom I am now about to use, nor will I presume to bespeak your regard by making any pretensions to public favor—The one, and the other, will be more properly referred to the graciousness of your disposition towards me, and to the knowledge...