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It is the Commander in Chief’s earnest desire that you will, without failure, forward all his Papers, recorded and unrecorded, to New York before the first of Decr next. I am with much esteem Dear Varick Your Most Obed. Servt P.S. I am recovering my health & strength slowly—I hope we shall see you in N. York where we may talk over matters & things at our leisure. NHi : Richard Varick Papers.
Upon an after consideration it is found necessary that a very discreet & intelligent Subaltern with a proper command should be sent as early as may be tomorrow Morng to take possession of the Works at Paulus Hook, which it appears by Sir Guy Carleton’s last letter are to be evacuated tomorrow. The Commander in Chief desires you will arrange this business & give the necessary Orders to the...
After your public Audience was concluded on the 23d of Deer the President of Congress took me aside, and requested, “if any thing should occur to me in consequence of what had just been suggested in favor of the Gentlemen of General Washington’s family who had continued with him to that moment, that I would communicate it to him in a Letter,” and further observed, that he should take great...
I arrived at this place just a Month from the time of my leaving Mount Vernon, perfectly free from Misadventures, altho’ attended with disagreeable roads & the coldest weather I ever experienced—in my route I had the pleasure of executing all your commands, except that of delivering your verbal Message to Govr Clinton, this, the impracticability of passing the Hudson below Kings-ferry...
A few hours after your departure, I received a private communication from a friend in Congress informing me of my appointment as Secretary to the Commissioners for forming Commercial Treaties in Europe —Tho’ pleased with the information I considered myself as unfortunate in not having recd the Letter while your Excellency remained in Town—because I wished to avail myself of Letters of...
You may be surprised, tho I dare say you will not be displeased to receive a Letter from me, dated at a moment when you would have supposed I had already traversed at least one half of the Atlantic—The occasion of my having yet to embark is this—Governor Jefferson on his tour to the eastern States informed me (in Connecticut) of the arrival of a french Packet at New York, in which he proposed...
Finding there was a Vessel in this port destined for Virginia, I could not take my departure for Paris without informing my dear General of my safe arrival in france after a most delightful passage of twenty four days; and as I cannot give a better discription of the excellent accomodations & beautiful weather which we have had during the whole of our voyage, than I have already given in a...
A direct opportunity for America having offered itself thro’ the medium of Colo. Franks I again indulge myself in writing to my dear General; and take the most heartfelt satisfaction in acknowledging the receipt of the Dispatches which were so obligingly addressed for me to the care of Govr Jefferson—who arrived in this City about ten days before me. Tho I dare not undertake to say in this...
I was obliged to close my last Letter of the 18th of Augst so abruptly that I had not even time to tell you how much satisfaction it would afford me, should I be able by my communications to contribute in any degree to your amusement or information, as you were pleased to intimate—permit me now to assure you, that the delightful employment of thus conversing with my dearest General, under the...
The Secretary of the Commission by appointment waited on the Duke of Dorset & delivered to him two Letters from the American Ministers dated the 28 th instant: whereupon the British Ambassador desired M r Humphreys to inform the Ministers of the United States, “that being entirely unacquainted with the negotiations proposed through M r Hartley to the Court of London, he could say nothing on...
Colonel le Maire who is this moment Setting off for Virginia affords an opportunity for communicating the latest & most important intelligence respecting European politics. The Emperor & the Dutch have gone so far in their quarrel about the navigation of the Scheld that there is hardly a possibility that either should recede—indeed the act of recalling their Ministers amounts in the estimation...
By the papers which I have the honor to enclose to your Excellency herewith you will be informed that I have received official Instructions to procure the several honorary presents which have been voted by Congress to different officers in their service during the late war, together with a Draft on M. Grand Banker at Paris for the amount of the expence —but I must beg leave further to inform...
I write this to request information of you, what is necessary, right, & proper to be done by me on saturday next— You can doubtless tell, Sir, whether it is expected & wished that the whole diplomatic Corps should, be at Versailles on New-year’s day, or whether the concourse will probably be so great as that the presence of the smaller limbs of that great Body may readily be dispensed with— I...
There is no great alteration in the complexion of the political world since I had the honour of addressing you last, except that there appears to be more probability that the contest between the Emperor & the Dutch will be accomodated without bloodshed, than there did at that period—preparations for war are however continued, & the Count de Maillebois—Leiut. Gen. in the Armies of France, now...
Since I had the honor to receive by the last Packet your favor dated in Feby last I have been unwell with a slight fever, & tho recovered at this moment it has retarded my public business in such a manner, as will prevent me from writing so particularly as I wished to have done by the present opportunity. I am extremely concerned & mortified to find that you have been under the necessity of...
I cannot permit M. Houdon to depart for Mt Vernon without being the bearer of a line from me. I am very happy Mr Jefferson has been able to procure him to make the voyage, because I am persuaded he will be able to transmit an excellent likeness of you to the remotest ages. He is considered as one of the ablest statuaries in Europe & has performed some capital peices for the Empress of Russia....
Being uncertain whether this letter will arrive at Bourdeaux in time to be carried to America by the vessel which brought me your favour of the 25th of July, I will content myself with assuring you how deeply I am penetrated by those expressions of confidence & friendship with which it is replete. Whether I should, or should not be at liberty to accept the liberal offer you make I cannot at...
I have been duly honoured with your favour of Decr. 4th. and on the subject of Gatteau’s application take the liberty to inform you that I never had an idea of his engraving the insignia of the Cincinnati. I clearly see the impropriety of it. I should therefore be much obliged if you would take the trouble of giving him definitive instructions on this and any other points that may occur in the...
I am honoured with your letter of the 5th inst. and shall execute your several commissions with the greatest satisfaction. I shall also procure the plan of the iron bridge over the Severn agreeably to your subsequent note. Gatteaux the Engraver lives in the Street St. Thomas de Louvre opposite the treasury of the Duke de Chartres. Now that there is no obstacle to commencing the Medal for Genl....
I hope Your Excellency, as well as your most worthy Colleague in the Commission to which I am attached as Secretary, will approve of my proposed return to America in the Spring, for the reasons I have already had the honour of suggesting in conversation; and that, in this case, I may be the bearer of a joint or seperate letters from M r. Jefferson & yourself purporting that I have not left...
I wrote to you by the ship which brought me your affectionate favour of the 25th of July; since which I have been honoured by the receipt of your letters of the 1st of Septr & 30th of Octr—they reached me a few days ago in this city, where I have been about two months. You may naturally expect I should give some little account of this great wonder of the world and the reception I have...
While I was in London I had the honour of informing your Excellency that as the commission to which I was attached as Secretary would expire in the Spring, I had given intimation to Congress of my having it in idea to return to America in the month of April, unless I should in the mean time receive such advices as might render it inexpedient. I also made the same communication to your very...
Colonel Smith has been so good as to take charge of a printed copy of M r Dwight’s Poem and a letter from that gentleman to your Excellency, which I found at my return from London had been forwarded under cover to me. He is also the bearer of a manuscript copy of M r Barlow’s Vision of Columbus together with letters from the Author and our friend M r Trumbull on the subject of its publication....
Colonel Smith has been so good as to take charge of a printed copy of M r Dwight’s Poem and a letter from that gentleman to your Excellency, which I found at my return from London had been forwarded under cover to me. He is also the bearer of a manuscript copy of M r Barlow’s Vision of Columbus together with letters from the Author and our friend M r Trumbull on the subject of its publication....
I have the honour to enclose several letters which Mr. Harrison brought from Spain, and which he intended (when he first arrived here) to have delivered into your hand; but having been obliged by some unexpected business to go to L’Orient, he desired me to give them a safe conveyance. He is not very sanguine in his expectations of our succeeding in the present negotiations with the Barbary...
[ Paris, 4 Apr. 1786. Entered in SJL as received 31 Apr. [1 May?] 1786. Letter not found. See William Short to TJ, 2 Apr. 1786.]
‘I have made no contracts for the other four , viz. for Genl. Washington’s on the evacuation of Boston, for Morgan, Washington and Howard on the affair of the Cowpens, because the designs for them have not been in readiness for execution until the present time. Nor can that for Genl. Morgan be commenced without farther information of the numbers killed, prisoners &c in the action to be...
My last letter to you, My dear General, was dated in Febry at London and forwarded by Captain Clagget late of the Maryland line, in that I had the honor of informing you of my intention to return to America in the Spring, in this I have the pleasure to announce my safe arrival from L’Orient after a pleasant passage of 32 days—I am charged with Compliments & messages for your Excellency on the...
By means of a merchant vessel that sails from this place for L’Orient, I have the pleasure to inform you of my safe arrival after an agreeable passage of 32 day; altho’ I cannot give so high commendations on the accomodations of the French Packet, as I could have done on a former occasion. The fineness of the weather and the hilarity of the passengers, however, atoned for some circumstances...
I had the pleasure, before I left New York, to receive your favor containing the enclosures respecting Asgil’s affair, and am taking measures for their publication —Interested, as I feel myself in your wellfare & happiness, I could not but be extremely affected by the account of your ill-health; and beg you will let me know in what condition your health is, as I shall not find myself at ease...