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To the Honorable the Legislatures of Virginia, Delaware Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. The Commissioners from the said states, respectively assembled at Annapolis, humbly beg leave to report. That, pursuant to their several appointments, they met, at Annapolis in the State of Maryland, on the eleventh day of September Instant, and having proceeded to a Communication of their powers;...
New York, February 27, 1789. A newspaper writer who signed himself “A Spectator” reported that Hamilton stated at a political meeting in New York City: “that as the residence of Congress would doubtless be esteemed a matter of some import to the city of NewYork, and as it would certainly be contended for— Our representative should be a man well qualified in oratory to prove, that this city is...
Newark [ New Jersey ] September 1, 1786 . “We set out this afternoon on a journey to Anapolis in obedience to the appointment of the Legislature respecting the proposed commercial arrangements and are thus far on our journey. This of course renders it impossible for either of us to be at the intended trials in which Mr. Rensselaaer is concerned.” ALS , in writing of H, New-York Historical...
We do certify that Mr Yates has delivered to us a Paper subscribed by him (of which the preceeding is a Copy) as declaritive of his Principles on which he will vote in Congress in the affirmative on the final Question on the Ordinance for putting the new Constitution for the United States into Operation. DS , in the handwriting of Ezra L’Hommedieu, Abraham Yates Papers, MS Division, New York...
The step lately taken by the Legislature of Pensylvania in repealing the act by which the government of that state had incorporated the Bank of North America has given rise to questions of a delicate and important nature. We observe with regret that the very existence of the Institution as a corporate body has by this proceeding been drawn into controversy: a circumstance which we consider in...
The Committee to whom were referred the proceedings of the Society of the Cincinnati, at their last General Meeting, beg leave to report: that they have attentively considered the alterations proposed at that meeting to be made in the original Constitution of the Society; and though they highly approve the motives which dictated those alterations, they are of opinion it would be inexpedient to...
The hon. Mr. Hamilton . This is one of those subjects, Mr. Chairman, on which objections very naturally arise, and assume the most plausible shape. Its address is to the passions, and its first impressions create a prejudice, before cool examination has an opportunity for exertion. It is more easy for the human mind to calculate the evils, than the advantages of a measure; and vastly more...
Mr. Hamilton . The honorable gentleman from Ulster has given a turn to the introduction of those papers, which was never in our contemplation. He seems to insinuate that they were brought forward, with a view of shewing an inconsistency in the conduct of some gentlemen—perhaps of himself. Sir, the exhibition of them had a very different object. It was to prove that this state once experienced...
The hon. Mr. Hamilton then rose. Mr. Chairman the honorable Member, who spoke yesterday, went into an explanation of a variety of circumstances to prove the expediency of a change in our national government, and the necessity of a firm union: At the same time he described the great advantages which this State, in particular, receives from the confederacy, and its peculiar weaknesses when...
Mr. Hamilton then reassumed his argument. When, said he, I had the honor to address the committee yesterday, I gave a history of the circumstances which attended the Convention, when forming the Plan before you. I endeavored to point out to you the principles of accommodation, on which this arrangement was made; and to shew that the contending interests of the States led them to establish the...
The Hon. Mr. Hamilton . Mr. Chairman I rise to take notice of the observations of the hon. member from Ulster. I imagine the objections he has stated, are susceptible of a complete and satisfactory refutation. But before I proceed to this, I shall attend to the arguments advanced by the gentlemen from Albany and Dutchess. These arguments have been frequently urged, and much confidence has been...
Mr. Hamilton . I only rise to observe that the gentleman has misunderstood me. What I meant to express was this; that if we argued from possibilities only; if we reasoned from chances, or an ungovernable propensity to evil, instead of taking into view the controul, which the nature of things, or the form of the constitution provided; the argument would lead us to withdraw all confidence from...
Mr. Hamilton . I recollect well the alteration which the gentleman alludes to; but, it by no means militates against my idea of the principles on which the convention acted at the time the report of the committee was under deliberation. This alteration did not take place till the convention was near rising, and the business compleated; when his excellency the president expressing a wish that...
The honorable Mr. Hamilton . It is not my design, Mr. Chairman, to extend this debate by any new arguments on the general subject. I have delivered my sentiments so fully on what has been advanced by the gentlemen this morning, that any further reasonings from me will be easily dispensed with. I only rise to state a fact, with respect to the motives which operated in the general convention. I...
Honorable Mr. Hamilton . I am persuaded, Mr. Chairman, that I in my turn, shall be indulged, in addressing the committee. We all, with equal sincerity, profess to be anxious for the establishment of a republican government, on a safe and solid basis. It is the object of the wishes of every honest man in the United States, and I presume I shall not be disbelieved, when I declare, that it is an...
The Hon. Mr. Hamilton . Mr. Chairman, in debates of this kind it is extremely easy, on either side, to say a great number of plausible things. It is to be acknowledged, that there is even a certain degree of truth in the reasonings on both sides. In this situation, it is the province of judgment and good sense to determine their force and application, and how far the arguments advanced on one...
The hon. Mr. Hamilton . Mr. Chairman, in the course of these debates, it has been suggested, that the state of New-York has sustained peculiar misfortunes, from the mode of raising revenues by requisitions. I believe we shall now be able to prove, that this state, in the course of the late revolution, suffered the extremes of distress on account of this delusive system. To establish these...
Mr. Hamilton . We shall make the same reservation. By the indisputable construction of these resolutions, we shall prove that this state was once on the verge of destruction, for want of an energetic government. To this point we shall confine ourselves. Childs, Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York The Debates and Proceedings of the State of New-York, Assembled at...
New York, March 8, 1785. Approves an “Account of the Repairs of the Buildings of Columbia College in this City.” DS , Columbia University Libraries. H was a member of the committee of accounts for Columbia College.
[ 1789–1795 .] Encloses the decision of the Federal District Court of Connecticut on the petition of Captain Timothy Savage. Suspects Savage of intent to defraud. LS , Yale University Library. The MS is a fragment without date or place.
The above is a copy of a paper transmitted me this day by Mr. Duane. You will perceive much is expected from us; and unfortunately in the situation of my business little is in my power. I wish to see you in Town as soon AL , The Huntington Library, San Marino, California. The letter is undated. It was written, as the first line states, on the date on which H received his commission from James...
Col. Hamilton supposed that it was agreed on all hands, that some relief should be granted—there was, he said two questions before the committee, one, if they would put them on a footing with the other citizens; and the other, if they did not merit something more. If said he, you receive their certificates, and grant them your own, you extend to them only that relief which you have already...
[ New York, 1786. ] Encloses draft of a certificate and asks Duane “to affix the seal of the Corporation” of the City of New York to the draft. ALS , New-York Historical Society, New York City. Duane was mayor of New York.
Col. Hamilton did not suppose that any arguments would have much influence on the decision of this question. There is no criterion to go by and we fall into the greatest uncertainty—a gentleman has told us plainly, that he has been intriguing, and making the best bargain he could for his county. He would not say that New-York had made any conditions—he hoped that the intrigues might not have...
[ New York ] March 23, 1786 . Plans to bring the cause of Benjamin Paine, et al. v. Peter Mesier, Jr. and Jacob Van Voorhees to trial at the next term of the Supreme Court. Copy, Mr. Otto Madlener, Hubbard Woods, Illinois.
Constitution Article 1st. That the Bank shall be called by the Name and Title of the Bank of New York. –2– That the Capital Stock consist of Five Hundred Thousand Dollars in Gold or Silver, divided into One Thousand Shares of Five Hundred Dollars each Share and that a Majority of all the Directors may at their discretion open new Subscriptions for encreasing the Capital Stock, when they shall...
Mr. Hamilton added his testimony to the fact that 2/3 in N. York had been ineffectual either where a popular object, or a legislative faction operated; of which he mentioned some instances. Hunt and Scott, Debates Gaillard Hunt and James Brown Scott, eds., The Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 Which Framed the Constitution of the United States of America. Reported by James Madison (New...
New York, December 6, 1785. “I am instructed by your brother Mr. Laurence Kortright to make the following proposal to you; to wit—that if you will pay him the amount of his account for money and other articles supplied you druing your residence in the Jerseys in the course of the war and will deliver him up his bond for £200 to be paid you at the death of his mother, he will then give you a...
New York, February 13, 1787. On this date Hamilton reported on behalf of a committee of which he was chairman on a petition from Margaret Livingston and others: “Proprietors in part of the Township of New-Stamford, in the County of Ulster, praying leave to present a bill for the partition of the said Township.” New York Assembly Journal Journal of the Assembly of the State of New York...
The only letter I have received from you in a considerable time is one introducing Lt Col Hastings to whom I have paid the attention which your recommendation will always give title to. The following remittances made by me remain unacknowleged by you. A bill of Exchange drawn by Constable & Rucker for £400 Sterling Currency Specie ⅌ the Tankerville Packet £1057.17.8 Ditto per the Carteret...
There appears to me to have been some confusion in the manner of voting on the two preceding clauses of this bill; the first, for granting the impost to the United States, having been carried by a majority of one, and the last, for making the officers employed in the collection accountable to them, having been lost by a much larger majority. I was induced to hope, from the success of the first...
Mr Bremar last evening delivered me your Letter inclosing a Copy of your Correspondence with Mr Lewis. In a personal Altercation between two Gentlemen where their passions have evidently become pritty warmly engaged, and for both whom I always had Esteem, I should not be willing to give my Opinion on the conduct of one of them, especially when the appeal was not made to me by both. On this...
I arrived here My beloved Betsey the fifth day after we set out, the three first days with every favourable circumstance but the two last through very bad weather. I am however as well as I can be absent from you and my darling boy —nor was I ever more impatient to be at home. I can have little pleasure elsewhere. I hope and persuade myself My Betsey is not less desirous for my return....
New York, September 1, 1786. Answers questions concerning a government contract for carrying the mail which Hazard had sent to Hamilton on August 1, 1786. Copy, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. Hazard enclosed H’s answers in a letter to Nathaniel Gorham, September 25, 1786.
I thank you My beloved for your letter by the Post. I have time only to tell you that I am well and to request to be remembered to your sister & to Mrs. Mitchell Adieu My beloved. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Letter not found. Ann Venton Mitchell, H’s cousin, had been known to him during his boyhood on St. Croix in the West Indies.
By the direction of the Committee I transmit you the inclosed letter. I doubt not Sir you will believe me to be sincere when I assure you that I should be much more happy if circumstances permitted me to be the channel of a very different application. But such is the situation of our state that personal attachments are obliged to yield to public necessity. As I allow myself to hope Sir that...
[ New York, December 6, 1787. On December 6, 1787, Hamilton wrote to Angelica Church “I this morning wrote a short and hasty line to your other self.” Letter not found. ]
Yesterday, My Dear Sir, The Convention made a house. That day and this have been spent in preliminary arrangements. Tomorrow we go into a Committee of the whole on the Constitution. There is every appearance that a full discussion will take place, which will keep us together at least a fortnight. It is not easy to conjecture what will be the result. Our adversaries greatly outnumber us. The...
New York, June 9, 1785. Cannot represent them in their land dispute with Robert Lettis Hooper and James Wilson, as Hooper and Wilson previously have engaged Hamilton’s services in the controversy. ADfS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. See John D. Coxe and Tench Coxe to H, May 21, 1785 .
Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Col. Hamilton , assented to the doctrine of Mr. Wilson. He denied the doctrine that the States were thrown into a State of Nature. He was not yet prepared to admit the doctrine that the Confederacy, could be dissolved by partial infractions of it. He admitted that the States met now on an equal footing but could see no inference from that against concerting a change of the system in this...
Before I left Town for Albany some time since, I requested Mr. Duer to mention to you, that I believed it would depend upon yourself to be President of the bank here. Since my coming to Town I find you are elected director; and I have no doubt you may be President if you please. I will be much obliged to you to let me know in confidence whether the appointment if made will be accepted. You may...
Col. Hamilton hoped the house would not recommit the bill. There was no doubt he said but the legislature possessed the right to give this power. There were frequent examples of the kind in Great Britain, where this power has been granted. No disadvantage he said could arise from it; on the contrary, many would be the benefits. He therefore wished the bill might be finished—as no doubt existed...
New York, March 28, 1786. Signs, with 136 other petitioners, a memorial asking that the “Mayor and Corporation of the City of New York” improve the street in front of the Coffee House, “the usual place of resort for your Memorialists and the merchants of this City.” The memorialists complained that the street “for want of proper regulation and the great concourse of Carts is coverd with filth...
I wrote to you by the last post since which nothing material has turned up here. We are debating on amendments without having decided what is to be done with them. There is so great a diversity in the views of our opponents that it is impossible to predict any thing. Upon the whole however our fears diminish. Yrs Affecty I take the liberty for certain reasons to put the inclosed under cover to...
New York, March 6, 1784. “Mrs. Naomi Dunbar widow of Daniel Dunbar has retained me as Council in a suit which she expects will shortly be brought in behalf of the state for a house and lot in this city sold by you to her husband.… Mrs. Dunbar therefore wishes … that you would procure and send over to her a proper conveyance for the house and lot.” ALS , Mr. Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles,...
As I flatter myself I may indulge a consciousness that my services have been of some value to the public, at least enough to merit the small compensation I wish, I will make no apology to your Excellency for conveying through you that wish to Congress. You are able to inform them if they wish information, in what degree I may have been useful— and I have entire confidence that you will do me...
14 September 1786, Annapolis. Drafted by Alexander Hamilton, with JM the chief witness as to authorship ( JM to Noah Webster, 12 Oct. 1804 , Madison, Writings [Hunt ed.] Gaillard Hunt, ed., The Writings of James Madison (9 vols.; New York, 1900–1910). , VII, 165). The full address is in Syrett and Cooke, Papers of Hamilton Harold C. Syrett and Jacob E. Cooke, eds., The Papers of Alexander...
Mr. Hamilton requests the favour of Mr W Livingston to lend his name to the enclosed. AL , New-York Historical Society, New York City. Livingston, a New York City lawyer, served as Commissioner of the Treasury from 1785 to 1789. The enclosure has not been found, but at the bottom of H’s letter Livingston wrote: “Nov. 18–88 The note enclosed was for £300 payable in 30 days drawn by himself in...
Albany, October 20, 1783. On this date Hamilton signed an oath for the faithful execution of his office. The oath, signed by five other lawyers, reads as follows: “I AB. chosen or appointed [as the Case may be] to the office of [here insert the officer’s Title of Office] Do solemnly in the presence of almighty God before whom I expect to answer for my conduct promise and swear, that I will in...