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New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of June 28 (Francis Childs’s Version), [28 June 1788]

New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of June 28
(Francis Childs’s Version)1

[Poughkeepsie, New York, June 28, 1788]

The hon. Mr. Hamilton. Mr. Chairman, in the course of these debates, it has been suggested, that the state of New-York has sustained peculiar misfortunes, from the mode of raising revenues by requisitions.2 I believe we shall now be able to prove, that this state, in the course of the late revolution, suffered the extremes of distress on account of this delusive system. To establish these facts, I shall beg leave to introduce a series of official papers, and resolutions of this state, as evidence of the sentiments of the people, during the most melancholy periods of the war. I shall request the secretary to read these papers, in the order in which I point them out.3

Childs, Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York description begins The Debates and Proceedings of the State of New-York, Assembled at Poughkeepsie, on the 17th June, 1788. To deliberate and decide on the Form of Federal Government recommended by the General Convention at Philadelphia, on the 17th September, 1787. Taken in Short Hand (New York: Printed and Sold by Francis Childs, 1788). description ends , 109.

2The suggestion had been made during the debates on the preceding day, June 27. The reason why H decided to emphasize this particular point of the Antifederalists was stated by George Clinton in the remarks which he made following H’s speech. “I presume,” the governor stated, “the introduction of this kind of evidence is occasioned by a conversation I had with one of the gentlemen yesterday” (Elliot, Debates description begins Jonathan Elliot, The Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution (Philadelphia, 1836). description ends , II, 357). The conversation, as indicated by James Duane in remarks following Clinton’s statement, had been with Duane.

3After a debate in which H, George Clinton, James Duane, Melancton Smith, and Thomas Tredwell participated, “the papers were then read by the secretary in the following order:

“1st. An extract from Governor Clinton’s speech to the legislature, September 7, 1780. 2d. Extract from the answer of the senate, September 9th, 1780. 3rd. Resolve of the assembly, October 10, 1780. 4th. Resolve of both houses, October 10, 1780, respecting the Hartford Convention. 5th. A letter from the legislature of New-York to Congress, dated Albany, February 5, 1781, describing the distresses of the state. 6th. A message from the Governor to the legislature, March 9, 1781, announcing the establishment of the confederation. 7th. Resolve of the legislature, dated March 29, 1781, relative to the Hartford convention. 8th. Resolve of the legislature, November 21, 1781, recommending a five per cent. impost. 9th. A resolution of 20th July, 1782, lamenting the want of powers in Congress, and pointing out the defects of the confederation.” (Childs, Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York description begins The Debates and Proceedings of the State of New-York, Assembled at Poughkeepsie, on the 17th June, 1788. To deliberate and decide on the Form of Federal Government recommended by the General Convention at Philadelphia, on the 17th September, 1787. Taken in Short Hand (New York: Printed and Sold by Francis Childs, 1788). description ends , 110–11.)

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