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Having just recd. a letter form my friend Doctor Rush, which contained the enclosed pacquet for you, I do myself the honor of covering it to you lest Col. Smith should have left Massachusetts: and since I have taken this liberty, Sir, I will do myself the pleasure to add such information as I conceive it may be any pleasure to you to receive. The returns from Virginia are recd. as far as nine,...
Philadelphia, May 21, 1785. Request Hamilton to represent them and to provide information on lands in dispute between John and Tench Coxe and Robert Lettis Hooper and James Wilson. Request Hamilton to forward certain legal documents to the commissioners of the Land Office of New York. LS , in writing of John D. Coxe, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. John D. Coxe, a Pennsylvania lawyer,...
Our city are about applying to the legislature for an incorporation, and among other lights have availed themselves of the corporation act of your city. As experience points out many defects, wch. do not at first strike the observation, you will very much oblige me by noting such things as you would advise us to avoid. If there are any matters which have been omitted, or if there are any...
Prior to the receipt of the Act of Virginia leading to a general Convention of the States, the Governmt. of Pennsylvania had in contemplation the Assimilation of those Commercial Systems, which have been adopted for a time by the several States. Tho’ difference of Circumstances has led to dissimilar regulations, it was thought that none should be adopted, which might be found to militate...
Some matters of a good deal of consequence to myself render it necessary for me to be known to Mr. Jefferson—just so far as to take the liberty of addressing two or three letters to him. You will oblige me very much by favoring me with two copies of a short letter of introduction to go by different opportunities. It will be much more agreeable to me to receive them from you sealed than open....
My anxiety in favor of the new federal Constitution has induced me to attempt some comments on it, that might render it more clear and agreeable to the people at large, than the concise manner, in which it was necessarily drawn up, would admit of. A friend, with whom I ventured to converse on the Subject, has pressed me to pass them thro the papers of Virginia and New York. This will apologize...
I troubled you with a few lines by Mr Moore, in which I promised myself the pleasure of sending you the third Number of the American Citizen, which I have now the pleasure to enclose. Our house is at this Moment on the Adoption of the plan. A Motion to postpone was made by our Western Members, but on the Question only 12 were for the postponement. The house are now proceeding, and the...
I recd. your letter acknowleging the rect. of the three papers in the Gazetteer. At the request of Mr. Wilson, Dr. Rush and another friend or two I added a 4th. paper, calculated to shew the general advantages & obviate some of the Objections to the System. It was desired by these Gentlemen for the purpose of inserting in one of several handbills, which it was proposed to circulate thro our...
I trouble you once more with an Attempt of mine to explain a point connected wth. the new federal constitution. Finding from a conversation with Mr. Wilson & Dr. Rush that an Idea in Mr. R. H Lee’s letter to your Governor concerning the commercial powers of Congress was doing mischief in Virginia I devoted last Sunday to an investigation of it. I take the liberty of enclosing a couple of...
I have obtained from the Editor about sixty pages of the debates of our State Convention, wch. I am anxious to get into the hands of Mr. King, for the use of the gentlemen in the Massachussets convention. Uncertain whether he is in New York or Boston I have taken the liberty of enclosing it to you with a request that you will as early as possible have it sent forward to him under a franked...
I am truely sorry that appearances are not more promising in Massachussets than I learn from your letter of 20th instant. The pamphlet may be of signal service as things unhappily are so circumstanced & I rejoice in having sent it. I hope the movements of the tradesmen will have an influence on a principal Character. The peculiar situation of Maine is unfortunate. The greatest difficulty will...
From your letter with respect to the Convention at B. I have been anxious to procure the Remr. of Mr. Lloyd’s debates to send to Mr. King. There were some pages more struck off, which I have obtained and cover them to you with a letter to be forwarded as before. I beg your pardon for the trouble I give & the freedom I have used. I find our Opposition were possessed of the temper of the Western...
I trouble you with the last No. (3) of the freeman. In the paper N. 1. signed a Pennsylvanian I have opened a regular examination of the state of the opposition here, & shall endeavour to add a refutation of some of the objections of the minority. Consolidation I shall of course retouch, & therefore wish any thing you meet on that Subject to be enclosed. No. 44, & 45 of Publius are very...
If you thought it worth attention to publish N. 1. of the Pennsylvanian perhaps No. 2, enclosed may also be properly inserted in the same paper. The first was in Hall & Sellers’s of 6th. sent before. I wish to believe the accot. of the 11th from New York informing of the Adoption by Massachussets on 5th instant—but we wait for the Numbers, the form, the more perfect Certainty. To Morrow I...
The fate of the new constitution is now hastening to a crisis. The decision of Virginia in its favor ensures its existence, for South Carolina will most certainly adopt it before you can be organized. If on the other hand your Convention should reject the Government it will be rendered extremely uncertain in New York, New Hampshire, and North Carolina. Had our friends been less sanguine in New...
We have been made very happy by the accots from Richmond by yesterday’s post which were to the 5th. of June. From them we learn that Governor R. has acquiesced in the evident sense of the Majority of the States and of the people & that all Questions were to be defer’d till the whole should be considered in parts—and a letter from the head of the Convention expresses the fullest belief, that...
Since you left Philadelphia I have kept my attention awake to the conduct of the most able—as well as the most active members of the late opposition. I find those who were excessively violent, active & unreserved in their opposition are perfectly silent. Their conduct carries more of ceasing to oppose, than of acquiescence. But some of the most sensible, cautious and artful characters express...
You were good enough to subscribe for a set of the letters of Publius at my request. I have recd. the Books, but as there was to be a remainder of subscription paid I shall be obliged to you, if in some future letter, you will note the amount. It has been affirmed to me with some confidence that a part of those papers were written by you. It would give me great pleasure before I read the work...
I am favored with your last by post & am much obliged to you for the News papers, and your remarks concerning the Views of the opposition in several places. I would not by any means wish a request of the circle of gentlemen, who wrote the papers under the Signature of Publius, which I think with you would be disagreeable and improper. I am to ask your pardon for the trouble I have given you on...
As I know your anxiety upon the Subject of the State legislatures, I have great Satisfaction in assuring you that by the returns of our new house at least 38 are firmly attached to the Constitution. The whole number is 69, but we have no returns of the greater part of the remainder. I think we have the best ground to believe the house will be 40 to 29 at least—and a very able man, Mr. Findlay,...
I have been here about a Fortnight during which time we have not made a Congress. So. Carolina, Virga, Pennsa, N. Jersey, & Massachussets are represented. There is one Member from each of the States of Rhode Island, N. Carolina & Georgia, but none from New Hampshire, Connecticut N. York, Delaware or Maryland. I very much wish we may make a house in a week or ten days, as I think the...
A very long acquaintance with Col. Saml. Hanson, who will have the honor to deliver you this letter, and the respectability and number of testimonials of his merits, which he carries with him to New York have induced me to trespass on your friendship. He goes as a candidate for some public employment for which his talents may be thought equal, and I wish to give him a chance of your support....
I have this afternoon obtained from a friend of Col. Geo. Morgan a copy of his handbill which was put into the hands of confidential people in N. Jersey & Pennsylvania for the purpose of procuring followers. I know your solicitude about the western Country, and have therefore enclosed you a copy, which after you have done with it be pleased to give to Mr. Jay when you have an opty. I am this...
I wrote you a few lines some days ago, which I hope you have received. The letter contained Col. Morgan’s propositions to our farmers & tradesmen. On sunday last I sat down to make a few notes on some points which appear necessary to be considered in forming our System of impost. Enclosed you will find a copy of them hastily transcribed, of which you will make any use you see proper. Some of...
I am very much at a loss how to address you on the subject, which has induced me to trouble you with this letter. It would have the complexion to most men of mere private gratification and advantage. I could not therefore touch the matter to you had I not pursued in my former correspondence only Objects connected with political truth and the public interests. Omitting therefore any further...
Having for some time felt a great deal of anxiety about the consequences to the United States, which appear likely to rise out of the Affairs of the Western Country I have turned my attention a good deal to considering that Subject, and as I know you also have had a very great solicitude about it I shall trouble you with such thoughts or facts relating to it as I think may possibly be of use....
[ Philadelphia, 3 Sep. 1787 . Recorded in SJL as received 13 Dec. 1787. Not found.]
On the 3d. instant I had the honor to enclose you a letter (of introduction) from the hon. Js. Maddison Jr., and another from myself directed to the person, who will deliver you this. The Nature of my Object did not permit my entering at that time into any explanation of the reasons by which I had been induced to request the favor of Mr. Maddison’s Letter, and at this time I think it will be...
I had the honor to inclose you some time ago a letter from the hon. Jas. Maddison Jr. Esqr. of Virga. and at the same time mentioned that a little time would necessarily elapse before I could have the pleasure of explaining myself on the business, which induced me to take the liberty of troubling you. The person who presents this to you, Mr. Andw. Mitchell will take the liberty of requesting...