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Documents filtered by: Author="American Commissioners" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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Our last letter to you was dated April 13. 1785. and went by the packet of that month from l’Orient. Since that date the Letter N o. 1. a. directed to D tr Franklin enclosing those marked N o. 1. b & c. and also the paper N o. 2. have come to hand. These relate to supplies furnished by M r Harrison to the crew of the ship Betsy taken by the Emperor of Morocco, on which subject Congress will be...
We received in due time the letter which your Grace did us the honour to write us on the 26 th day of March last, and have delayed the acknowledgment of it in expectation of the arrival of the packets, by which we hoped for further Instructions from Congress. We have now the honor to inform your Grace that Congress on the 24 th day of Feb y last, appointed a Minister Plenipotentiary to reside...
A Treaty of Amity & Commerce between the United States of America & his Majesty the King of Prussia having been arranged with the Baron de Thulemeyer his Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary at the Hague specially empowered for this Purpose and it being inconsistent with our other Duties to repair to that Place ourselves for the Purpose of executing & exchanging the Instruments of Treaty, we hereby...
The United States of America, heretofore connected in Government with Great Britain, have found it necessary for their Happiness to Seperate from her, and to assume an independant Station. consisting of a number of Seperate States, they have confederated together, and placed the Sovereignty of the whole, in matters relating to foreign nations, in an body an Assembly consisting of Delegates...
Heads of enquiry for M r Barclay as to Morocco, Algiers, Tunis & c — 1 Commerce. What are the articles of their export & import? what articles of American produce might find a market in Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli & c. and at what prices? whether rice, flour, tobacco, furs, ready built ships, fish, oil, tar, turpintine, ship timber & c. and whether any of these articles would hereafter be...
We have the honor to inform you that we have rec d. fm. the U: States of America, in Congress, full power & instructions to form treaties with the Emperor of Morocco & the Regencies of Algiers, Tunis & Tripoli, and we enclose you a Copy of a Resolution of Congress of 14 th. February 1785. impowering us to apply so much of the money borrowed in Holland to that use as we may deem necessary, not...
M r. Barclay will deliver you this letter in his way to Morocco. We have appointed him to this negotiation in hopes of obtaining the friendship of that State to our country, & of opening by that means the commerce of the Mediterranean, an object of sufficient importance to induce him to accept of the trust We recommend him & Col o. Franks who goes with him to your attention & assistance, and...
We do ourselves the Honour to acquaint your Excellency, that We have appointed Thomas Barclay Esq the Consul General of the United States in France, to proceed to the coast of Barbary in Africa, there to enter into Negotiation and to endeavour to form Treaties, of Amity between the United States and the King or Emperor of Morocco or Fez; the Regencies of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli, or with any...
The Congress of the United States of America after the conclusion of that war which established their freedom & independance, & after the cares which were first necessary for the restoration of order & regular government, turned their attention in the first moment possible to the connections which it would be proper to form with the nations on this side the Atlantic for the maintenance of...
Congress having been pleased to invest us with full powers for entering into treaty of Amity and Alliance with the Emperor of Morocco, and it being impracticable for us to attend his court in person & equally impracticable on account of our seperate stations to receive a Minister from him, we have concluded to effect our object by the intervention of a confidential person. We concur in wishing...