You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, John
  • Period

    • Confederation Period

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 1-50 of 1,097 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Draught of a treaty of Amity & Commerce between her most faithful Majesty the Queen of Portugal and the Algarva’s and the United States of America— The Parties being willing to fix in a permanent & equitable manner the rules to be observed in the Commerce they desire to establish between their respective Countries, have judged that the said end cannot be better obtained than by taking the most...
Art. XI. 2 + There shall be, a full and entire Liberty of Conscience allowed, to the Inhabitants and Subjects of each Party and no one Shall be molested, in regard to his Worship, provided he Submits, as to the public Demonstration of it, to the Laws of the Country. There Shall be given moreover Liberty when any Subjects or Inhabitants of either Party, Shall die in the Territory of the other,...
And it is further specially agreed that except the liberty of introducing woollens into the kingdom of Portugal which has been ceded to certain nations in compensation for their privileges yeilded on their grant to the commerce of Portugal, shall not be understood to be communicated to the citizens of the U. S. by this or any other article of the present treaty. which is the effect of a...
Observations Sur le Traité D’Amitie et de Commerce. N. 1 ere. We must conform ourselves, as to the Titles to the following Rule “between her most faithfull Majesty the Queen of Portugal and the Algarves”. &c Art. I. N. 2 We must observe in this Article the Same Rule, above established. The Rest will meet with no Difficulty. Art. II. N. 3. The same Observation, in the words underscored. it...
After a Passage of two days, against contrary Winds, and a terrible Jolt through the Mud, from Helvoet, I arrived here this day, in good health and not bad Spirits. The Princes Birth day is on Saturday: so that I shall not be able to take Leave before Monday, and if I go to Amsterdam afterwards, I shall not be able to leave that City before Wednesday or Thursday: so that I fear you cannot...
We have received from Congress a Resolution by which We are to be impowered to negotiate a Treaty of Commerce with G. B. My self Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jay. This will detain me in Europe this Winter. If this Letter arrives in Season, that you can come to me this Fall with Miss Nabby, I shall be Supreamly happy to see you. But Still Things are so unsettled in Congress that you may expect to...
I have past through the Ceremonies of taking Leave of the States General, the Prince and Princess &c to the Satisfaction of all Parties—and have been feasted at Court, and all that.— made my Compliments to the Prince on the 8. of March his Birth Day, and to the Princess at her Drawing Room &c &c &c. and should have been in London at this hour if you had not have laid a Plott, which has brought...
Your Letter of the 23d. has made me the happiest Man upon Earth. I am twenty Years younger than I was Yesterday. It is a cruel Mortification to me that I cannot go to meet you in London, but there are a Variety of Reasons decisive against it, which I will communicate to you here. Meantime, I Send you a son who is the greatest Traveller, of his Age, and without Partiality, I think as promising...
I have had another Fever, which brought me low, but as it has carried off certain Pains and Lamenesses the Relicks of the Amsterdam Distemper, I am perswaded it will do me, much good. I am going next Week to London, with my son. I may Stay Six Weeks, if nothing from Congress calls me away Sooner. I have only to repeat my earnest Request that you and our Daughter would come to me, as soon as...
Before this time I hope you have the Happiness to See your Daughter out of all Danger and your Son in Law and your two grand children in perfect health. I have no Letter from you, Since that you wrote at Hartford, and I cannot find fault because this is the first I have written to you. We are all very well, and go on very well. Charles came home and Thomas went to Haverhill, last Week.— We are...
I have this Day, by Special Permission from their Majesties obtained by Mr. West the Painter who with Mr. Copely do so much honour to our Country, Seen the Appartements in the Queens House, as it is called, or Buckingham House. It is a great Curiosity indeed. There is an inestimable Collection of Paintings by the greatest Masters, Raphael, Rubens, Vandyke, and many others. There is one Room...
I have time only to inform you that We are well, and to repeat my earnest Wish and Expectation to see you as soon as possible. Draw upon me for Whatever Money You want and it shall be paid at Sight. I have been invited by the Duke of Portland and Mr. Fox to See them and I have Seen them and Mr. Burke an d met a cordial Reception from all three. These would do right if they governed. But I am...
I have been so diligent on the Road and so much interrupted by Company at the Taverns that this is the first time I have been able to get an opportunity to write to you. We arrived at this house last night (Saturday) Shall rest here to day and go into N. York tomorrow.— at Hartford, the Manufacturers presented me with a Piece of Broadcloth, for a Suit of Cloaths. at N. Haven the Corporation...
We are lodged in our old Chamber at Amsterdam, and Sleep as soundly as if there were not a dozen houses plundered every night. The two nights before the last were very Seditious. last night was quiet, and the Precautions which Secured the Peace then, will be continued, so t[hat] all will be still.— dont be anxious for Us, nor believe half the Reports that will be circulated. Such Events are...
This moment returning from Mr Bridgen where I had been to deliver him a Letter to you, written this Morning I found your very agreable favour of the 23. Am very glad you are so well Situated, So much pleased with your Journey, and present Accommodation. Dont be solicitous about me. I shall do very well—if I am cold in the night, and an additional quantity of Bed Cloaths will not answer the...
I have the Satisfaction to inform you that the definitive Treaties were all Signed yesterday, and the Preliminaries with Holland were Signed the day before. Ours is a Simple Repetition of the provisional Treaty. So We have negotiated here, these Six Months for nothing. We could do no better Situated as We were. To day We dined with Mr. Hartley and drank Tea with the Duchess of Manchester. Thus...
I was much disappointed, on the Arrival of Mr. Temple in London, at not finding a Letter from you, but last Week at Amsterdam, I had the Happiness to receive your kind favours of Sept. 20. and Oct. 19. Mr. Trumbull is not arrived. The Loss of my kind Father, has very tenderly affected me, but I hope, with full Confidence to meet him in a better World. My ever honoured Mother I still hope to...
This Morning for the first Time, was delivered me the Resolution of Congress of the first of May, that a Commission and Instructions Should be made Out, to Me, Dr. Franklin and Mr. Jay to make a Treaty of Commerce with Great Britain. If this Intelligence had been Sent Us by Barney, who Sailed from Philadelphia a Month after, the 1st of May, and has now been Sailed from hence on his return home...
I have rec d yours of the 7. th — I have written you on every Post day. M r Jefferson is so anxious to obtain Money here to enable him to discharge some of the Most urgent demands upon the United States and preserve their Credit from Bankruptcy for two Years longer after which he thinks the new Gov’t will have Money in their Treasury from Taxes; that he has prevailed upon me to open a new...
Yours of Jany. 10 to Mr. Robbins, he shewed me this Moment and informs Me, he goes on Board on Monday. I regret that I have had no earlier Knowledge of this young Gentleman. My son and I have been here, this fortnight, and have been very civilly and obligingly treated, by some private Gentlemen. But this Government? It is a fine Country; but it is undone by Prosperity. It has the Vertigo in...
We have Seen Magnificence, Elegance and Taste enough to excite an Inclination to see more. We conclude to go to Birmingham, per­ haps to the Leasowes, and in that Case shall not have the Pleasure to see you, till Sunday or Monday. Love to my dear Nabby, and to Coll Smith. He will be so good as to give this account of Us, if any Questions are asked. Yours forever RC ( NhD .) JA and Thomas...
Your favour without a Date, just now received and Mr. Jeffersons Arrival, a Month sooner than he expected, have indeed changed my Plan. Stay where you are, and amuse yourself, by Seeing what you can, untill you See me. I will be with you in Eight Days at farthest, and sooner, if possible. I will cross from Helvoet sluis to Harwich, by the Packet of the day after tomorrow if I can. If this is...
I have rec d your favours of the 3 and 13 th and have opened that to our Son, who has been absent from me these 3 Weeks at Newbury, where I Suppose he is very well.— I am as anxious as you are about your coming home. There are but two Ways. 1. if Coll Smith can bring you and his Family with you, will be the more obliging and agreable. 2. if he cannot, I must send your eldest son, with a Coach...
I wrote you Yesterday, that I had executed the Contract and should return to England by the Packet of Wednesday the Sixth of June. But as the Money Lenders, whether to make a mere Compliment to me, whether to shew their Patriotism, or whether from simple Caprice, made it an original Condition that my Name should be Subscribed to all the obligations, as it was in the first loan, instead of...
This is the first Moment I have been able to Seize, in order to acquaint you of my Arrival and Situation. Governor Clinton The Mayor of New York, all the old officers of the Continental Government, and the Clergy, Magistrates and People, have Seemed to emulate the two houses of Congress, in shewing every respect to me and to my office.— For Particulars I must refer you to the public Papers....
Mr Murray, whom I am glad to see out again will carry to Bath this Memorandum that We are all very well. He will arrive for what I know before Mr Bridgen. The Weath’s is very cold, but by a good fire and a good Walk I have not yet been obliged to recur to my Expedient of an immaculate Virgin Bottle of hot Water. I sent Yesterday—Packetts to Coll Smith from Paris. The News from Boston is very...
I hope you have had a Pleasant Journey and are happy in your tour. I am, in a state of Phylosophic Solitude, that has hitherto been very tolerable, because I know my Treasures are not far off. But, as soon as the Novelty of it, wears off, and my occupation shall cease it will grow tedious enough. Dont hurry yourself however nor your Friends, but improve the opportunity to see, whatever you...
From the first of April to this time, I have been in constant and anxious Expectation of hearing of your Arrival in London. Your Letters encouraged me to hope and expect it, otherwise I should have been with you at Braintree before now. I still expect to hear of your arrival every moment, but as your last letters by Mr. Warren expressed a doubt, it is possible, even that this Letter may find...
With the tenderest emotions of a father’s heart, I congratulate you on your agreeable voyage, and happy arrival; and hope that your journeys in Europe, and your returning voyage to your own country, will be equally prosperous. At your age, travels are pleasing and instructive. But that you may be able to derive the full benefit from them, let me recommend to you to keep a journal. I have never...
I thank you for your Kind Letter of the 9th. of April, and congratulate you on the admission of your Brother, which must add much to your happiness. Thomas I suppose will join you in the fall, my Heart will be often with my treasure, at the University. My friends in their Letters give me favourable accounts of all my sons and of my Nephew Mr. Cranch, Your Characters are fair take care to keep...
I have recieved with pleasure your letter of the 22d. of octr. and agree with you that the times are such as to make it difficult for a young Gentleman, to determine upon a Profession, yet there is no reason to be discouraged, The Prospect will brighten. I have so well grounded a Veneration for the Law, that I shall never discourage any of my sons from pursuing the study of it, if their Genius...
I am much obliged to you for the Copy of your Dialogue, which does you honour. I am the more pleased to learn that you are to col­ lect the Mathematical Theses, as the Same part fell to my Share in the Year 1755. Your Reasons for preferring Newbury Port to Boston for the Study of the Law are judicious, and discover an Attention and a Consideration, which give sure Presages of your future...
We Suppose, that you had your Degree last Wednesday, and upon that Supposition, I congratulate you upon it. it is hinted that you think of studying Law with Judge Dana till next Spring. if you can have the Honour and the Priviledge of studying under, two such great Masters as Judge Trowbridge and Judge Dana, I approve very much of the design. You cannot be in so good hands. but will the...
I have the Pleasure of yours of July 30. and advise you to purchase the Coach and prepare every Thing to set off with me to Dover in a Week from this Day. I will not loose a Moment, of the agreable Company, that I can avoid. Indeed I have repented 20 times that I did not go with you. The Pas of Calais and the Pas of Harwich will make me sick, but do me no harm. Purchase Johnsons Lives of the...
A young Gentleman of 17, must not talk of low Spirits for Small disappointments. He must reconcile his Mind to them. He will meet with many. My Friend Dr. Warren often told me, I was the most uniformly lucky Man, he ever knew, and indeed I must acknowledge, I have been often fortunate, both before and Since his Compliment. Notwithstanding which my Life has been a Series of dissappointments,...
I am much pleased with your Oration and much obliged to you for it. it seems to me, making allowance for a fathers Partiality, to be full of manly Sense and Spirit. By the Sentiments and Principles in that oration, I hope you will live and die, and if you do I dont care a farthing how many are preferred to you, for Style Elegance and Mellifluence. To Vattel and Burlamaqui, whom you Say you...
Last night I received yours of the 1. with the Letter from your Mother to you, by which it appears so uncertain when She will arrive or embark, that if you can persuade Mr. Smith to come over here with the Ladies when they arrive, I would not have you wait for them. Make a Visit to Mr. Whitefoord, and ask the favour of him in my name to procure you a Place in the Gallery of the House of...
I hope, that before this day you are Safely arrived at New York, and that in another Month, I shall receive a Letter from you dated from that City. Before this reaches you I Suppose you will be at Boston or Cambridge, or Braintree or Haverill or Weymouth. Let me hear from you as often as you can. We have taken a House in Grosvenor Square, at the Corner of Duke Street, and hope to get into it...
I have received your Letter by Mr. Church, and am very happy to hear of your Safe Arrival, and kind Reception at New York. You have a good Opportunity, to See the Place and principal Characters, and from the hints you give your Sister I Suppose and indeed I hope, you went home by Land, and Saw the Country and Persons you wanted to See. I want to hear from you at Boston, and to learn what is...
This Letter, I presume, will find you at the University, where I hope you will pass your time both pleasantly and profitably. Let Us know how you find Things, and take care of your health. You have in your Travels had so much Exercise, that it is not Safe to discontinue it, and indulge your self too much in a Sedentary Life. Never fail to walk an hour or two every day. I have read the Conquest...
Give me leave to congratulate you on your Admission into the Seat of the Muses, our dear Alma Mater, where I hope you will find a Pleasure and Improvements equal to your Expectations. You are now among Magistrates and Ministers, Legislators and Heroes, Ambassadors and Generals, I mean among Persons who will live to Act in all these Characters. If you pursue your Studies and preserve your...
At Amsterdam I received your Letter of the 18 and to day that of the 20th. Write me, when you Ship the Books for Rotterdam, and by what Captain what Vessell and to whom addressed. Your principal Attention Should be to Parliament, and the Bar at present. Your Stay will be short and you will not probably have another Opportunity of being much in London, for upon your Return I shall keep you very...
Dr Gordon brought me your Letter of the 2d. of April, which gave me, great Pleasure. In order to get acquainted with the other Classes enquire who are the most remarkable Scholars in each, and drop in upon them frankly, make them a visit in a Leisure hour at their Chambers, and fall into Conversation. Ask them about their Tutors manner of teaching. Observe what Books lie upon their Tables, ask...
I hope Mr. Storer, when he delivers this Letter, will find you a Student in the University, or upon the Point of becoming So. We have as yet no News of your Arrival in America, but We hope to learn it by the first ship. We are comfortably Situated here, and have all enjoyed very good Health hitherto in England. But Home is Home. You are Surrounded by People who neither hate you nor fear you. I...
I received your Letter of the 15th. on the 18th. and that of the 18th. this moment, and am happy to find that you Spend So much Time and take so much Pleasure in Chancery and Parliament. Present to Mr. Vaughan and Mr. Whiteford, my Thanks for their Politeness to you. I want to know if the Books are on their Way. You Should tell me Something of them in every Letter untill they are gone off, by...
There is no Accomplishment, more usefull or reputable, or which conduces more to the Happiness of Life, to a Man of Business or of Leisure, than the Art of writing Letters. Symplicity, Ease, Familiarity and Perspicuity, comprehend all the necessary Rules. But these are not acquired without Attention and Study. The Habit you now form will go with you through Life. Spare no Pains then to begin...
Your advice “to reconcile myself to the Thought that Justice may not be done me, till I am dead” is friendly. I am not however apprehensive of Injustice living or dead. I am not ambitious of a Reputation for great Talents or Splendid Actions, with the present Age or with Posterity. The great Anxiety of my Life, has been to do my Duty and avoid just Reproach. and I know very well, that my Life...
D r Gordon who is arrived with your Favour of the 13 of April, will probably be disappointed in his Wishes that mutual affection may be restored; as much as he is mistaken in his opinion; that this is the only means of the Prosperity of both Countries.— America will prosper whether Love or Hatred Subsists. It is indeed improbable that mutual affection will ever be restored, not indeed So much...
I have this morning received your Favours of the 16 & 17 of April, and am fully with you in Sentiment, that “the Sooner a commercial Treaty is settled with the English, the better,” but you must be Sensible that no Treaty can be made untill Somebody or other, one or more, are authorized by Congress. While every British Minister is dancing on a slack Rope and afraid of every popular Wind, least...
Give me Leave to introduce to you, Mr Anstey a Member of Parliament and Barrister at Law, who is Sent out by the Commissioners of American Claims to verify Facts, Such as Titles to Estates, Incumbrances upon them &c. The House of Commons Yesterday ordered an Account of Vessells cleared out for the Importation of Flour Biscuit and Live Stock from the U States into any of the Islands of...