You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, John
  • Period

    • Confederation Period

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 1-50 of 1,097 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
1Memorandum, 1789 (Adams Papers)
President. Vice-President. Mr. Langdon 1. Mr. Dalton & Lady 2 Mr. Wingate 1. Mr. Strong 1 Mr. Johnson & Lady 2 Mr. Elmer 1 Mr. Elsworth 1 Mr. Patterson 1 Mr. Morris 1
This is the first Moment I have been able to Seize, in order to acquaint you of my Arrival and Situation. Governor Clinton The Mayor of New York, all the old officers of the Continental Government, and the Clergy, Magistrates and People, have Seemed to emulate the two houses of Congress, in shewing every respect to me and to my office.— For Particulars I must refer you to the public Papers....
Invited to this respectable situation by the suffrages of our fellow citizens, according to the Constitution, I have thought it my duty cheerfully and readily to accept it. Unaccustomed to refuse any public service, however dangerous to my reputation, or disproportioned to my talents, it would have been inconsistent to have adopted an other maxim of conduct at this time, when the prosperity of...
I have been so diligent on the Road and so much interrupted by Company at the Taverns that this is the first time I have been able to get an opportunity to write to you. We arrived at this house last night (Saturday) Shall rest here to day and go into N. York tomorrow.— at Hartford, the Manufacturers presented me with a Piece of Broadcloth, for a Suit of Cloaths. at N. Haven the Corporation...
I am greatly obliged, by the Letter you did me the Honour to write me on the 18th. of February; and regret very much the want of Leisure to examine the Subject of it, with that attention which its great Importance required. That the Truth; may be pleaded in Bar of a civil Action for Damages, for actionable Words, Spoken or written, I remembered very well: but it lay in my mind that Some just...
Your friendly letter of the third and twentieth of February, I did not receive till Saturday last. To your Friend, who has now been returned from N. York these five Weeks, I have delivered your inclosed Letter as desired. She will acknowledge the Receipt of it, and transmit you the Compliments of her fellow Travellers. Our Correspondence has had a short interruption, it is true, as all others...
The inclosed Letter from The Hon. Stephen Higginson Esqr, is upon a Subject of so much Importance, and contains so much Information that I cannot withold it from you. The little Jealousy, Envy or Caprice, that shall deprive our Merchants of the Benefit of trading to the Isles of France & Bourbon, will only compell them to seek the Ultimate markets upon the Continent, directly. In four days,...
The inclosed Letter from The Hon. Stephen Higginson Esqr. is upon a Subject of so much Importance, and contains so much Information that I cannot withold it from you. The little Jealousy, Envy or Caprice, that shall deprive our Merchants of the Benefit of Trading to the Isles of France and Bourbon, will only compell them to seek the Ultimate Markets upon the Continent, directly. In four days,...
Your obliging favor of the 22d Ult. I recd. last night. I remember so much of the transactions, at the formation of the Pensilvania Constitution, that I wish you could save time enough from almost any other pursuit, to arrange your materials for an History of the Revolution in Pensilvania, to be published hereafter; at present perhaps it might not be prudent. The four Respectable characters,...
Give me leave to introduce to you John Coffin Jones Esqr, an eminent Merchant of Boston and a late Member of the Legislature from that Town. His Character both in public and private Life is much respected, and his Intelligence will enable him to give you a much better account of the general and particular Politicks of this Country than I can. Our Fellow Citizens are in the midst of their...
I have but this hour, received the Letter you did me the Honour to write me, on the 30th. Ult.—Enclosed in haste are a Letter to Mr. Jefferson and another, to a Friend who will be equally glad to see Mr. Jones. I am much obliged to you for giving me this opportunity of doing this little Service for your Friend and only wish it was of more importance, both for your Sake and his, being with very...
Give me leave to introduce to you John Coffin Jones Esqr, an eminent Merchant of Boston and a late Member of the Legislature from that Town. His Character both in public and private Life is much respected, and his Intelligence will enable him to give you a much better account of the general and particular Politicks of this Country than I can. Our Fellow Citizens are in the midst of their...
As The “Letters from a Citizen of New-Heaven, to a Citizen of Virginia, concerning the Inutility of any Partition of the Legislative Power, into Several Assemblies,” are become a Part of the French and American Literature; they will descend to Posterity as one monument of the Principles and Opinions of this important Period. Posterity therefore, both in France and America will, be interested,...
our celestial Citizen, in his Second Letter, has it in design to explain, the constitution of a Single Legislative Body; the manner of fixing the Extent and Limits of the Power, which it ought to exercise; and the form, according to which, it ought to give its decisions, to the End that the Citizens may enjoy the Advantages of a free, peaceable and durable Constitution. This method, of...
I have rec d your favours of the 3 and 13 th and have opened that to our Son, who has been absent from me these 3 Weeks at Newbury, where I Suppose he is very well.— I am as anxious as you are about your coming home. There are but two Ways. 1. if Coll Smith can bring you and his Family with you, will be the more obliging and agreable. 2. if he cannot, I must send your eldest son, with a Coach...
If I had been told at my first arrival that five months would pass before I should write a line to Mr. Brand Hollis, I should not have believed it. I found my Estate in Consequence of a total neglect and inattention on my Part for fourteen years, was fallen to decay; and in so much disorder, as to require my whole attention to repair it. I have a great Mind to essay a description of it—It is...
Before this time I hope you have the Happiness to See your Daughter out of all Danger and your Son in Law and your two grand children in perfect health. I have no Letter from you, Since that you wrote at Hartford, and I cannot find fault because this is the first I have written to you. We are all very well, and go on very well. Charles came home and Thomas went to Haverhill, last Week.— We are...
It is with great and sincere Pleasure that I have to acknowledge the receipt of your friendly and obliging letter of the 26th of August. Your kind congratulations on my arrival are very agreeable to me. I assure you it was a very pleasing Event and the few Months that have passed since I have been at home, have been the happiest portion of my life. The Agriculture, the Manufactures and the...
A multiplicity of avocations have prevented me, from answering your friendly letter of the 2d. of July, till I am almost ashamed to answer it, at all. Your Congratulations on my Arrival and kind Reception are very agreable because I know them to be sincere. Your Compliments upon my poor Volumes are consolatory, because they give me grounds to hope that they may have done some good. It is an...
With much Pleasure did I receive your friendly and obliging Letter of the 21 of August, and your kind congratulations on my arrival at my home, although in the fourteen years of the best Part of my Life, which has been devoted to the Public Service, my private fortune has been much injured and the Prospects of my children greatly obscured yet, I cannot but reflect on them with Pleasure, as...
I have received your friendly letter and am much obliged to you for your kind remembrance and solicitations. I also thank you for the Trouble you have taken in sending my Books to the gentlemen of whom I gave you a list. But I wish to be informed whether you sent the three Volumes or only the first. I directed Mr: Dilly, Bookseller in the Poultry, London to send fifty Copies of each of the...
Our anxiety for you, in your present circumstances and situation among strangers, (though we doubt not you have many friends,) has prevailed upon me to make a great sacrifice, in consenting to your mother’s journey to Long Island. * * * * * * * I am kindly obliged to Col. Smith and to you, for your many invitations, and I have a great desire to see you, your friends, and even your situation....
I was much obliged to you for a letter by Mr. Nesbit of Philadelphia, and am very sorry I could not have more of his company. He was much esteemed, I find, in Boston. I wished for you, when he was here, because you could never have a better opportunity of seeing your old military friends. We had a review of the militia, upon my farm; and a battle that threw down all my fences. I wish, however,...
As I had an opportunity to be made acquainted with your Conduct in the Service of the United States in Holland as well as in France, and in the Negociation with Morocco, I think it my Duty to join my Testimony to the very respectable ones you have obtain’d before, and to say that I have ever thought the Public greatly indebted to your Diligence, Judgement and Integrity in all the Public...
Last night, I received the Letter you did me the Honour to write me, on the thirteenth of September, informing me of the Honour that has been done me by the University over which you so worthily preside. If this honorary Degree is, as you inform me, to be considered as a token of Affection and Esteem, I shall certainly hold it among the most precious of Things; since nothing can ever be more...
From the Conversation that pass’d, between you and me, when I had the Pleasure to See you for a few moments at this place, I am apprehensive that you may think of me for a Senator, as I find that Some other Gentlemen have, done and continue to do. You know very well how ungracious and odious the Non Acceptance of an Appointment by Election is, and therefore let me beg of you, not to expose me...
The multiplied Cares attending the Removal of a Family, from one Country to another; and beginning a new Course of Life or resuming an old one, after an interruption of fourteen years; must be my apology, if any apology is neccessary, for having omitted, till this time, to Solicit the final Settlement of my Accounts, with the United States.—As Mr Barclay has, for many years, had the...
On saturday night I received your letter of the tenth of this month, and with it a letter inclosed to you from his excellency Mr Bowdoin of the same date. The late misfortune in a family for which from my earliest infancy, I have entertained a particular respect, the charges and suspicions against you, for whom I have long had a particular regard, have affected me so very sensibly, that I...
Mr Adams presents his compliments to Mr Apthorp, and at the desire of Mr Morton, has the honor to send him enclosed a letter from his Excellency the late govenor Bowdoin, to Mr Morton of the 10th inst. and a copy of Mr As own letter to Mr Morton of this days date. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
A few days before leaving Paris I had the honour to receive your letter. Since that I have passed through London on my way to this place. The cause of my coming has been communicated to you some time ago, and I have nothing to say on that subject. Learning that a vessel is about to sail from Amsterdam for New-York in a few days, I profit of that occasion to send you a little of the reigning...
I have drawn upon you, this day, for three hundred Pounds Sterling, in favour of Mr John Osborne, on order which I pray you to accept and pay. I presume, that before this time, Sir Clement Cotterel Dormer, the Master of the Ceremonies, has paid that Sum into your hands for me.—But if he has not, I Should be obliged to you if you will call upon that Gentleman, and let him know that I have drawn...
I have this day, drawn upon Messrs C. & R. Puller in Broadstreet Buildings, for Three hundred Pounds, in favour of Mr John Osborne, Supposing that they have recd that Sum for me, of Sir Clement Cotterel Dormer. But, if I Should be mistaken in this Supposition, and the Bill s Should be presented to you, I pray you, to accept and pay it out of my Money in your hands. With great Regard &c MHi :...
Dr. Leonard will have the honour to inclose this Letter, which is merely to inform you that he came over in the Same ship with me, and that from all I have Seen or heard of him, he is a very honest and inoffensive Man. By his own Account he has had great Experience in various Manufactures, and has been totally ruined, for a Suspicion that he meditated Sending to America Maps and Plans of...
I am much obliged to you, for your kind Congratulations on my Arrival, and Mrs Adams returns you her Compliments and Thanks. The Accession of Virginia, to the New Constitution is a great event.—You and I Should not materially differ, I fancy, if We were to compare Notes of a perfect Commonwealth. But I consider the present Project, as a commencement of a national Government, to be a valuable...
Your mamma’s hand has been wholly unable to hold a pen, without exquisite pain, from the time of our arrival; and I am afraid your brothers have not done their duty in writing to you. Indeed, I scarcely know what apology to make for myself. Would you believe this is the first day that I have taken a pen into my hand since I came ashore? I am happy to hear from all quarters a good character of...
The kind and condescending Congratulations of so illustrious a Body as the Legislature of the Massachusetts on my arrival with my Family, in this my native Country, does me great honour and demands my most gratefull Acknowledgements If the Dangers and Fatigues which have fallen to my share in the Course of a memorable Revolution, have contributed in any degree, to the Acquisition or Security...
I have, to day, received your kind letter of the 7th, and the Valuable books that accompanied it; Mariana, Corio, and Ramsay, for which I most heartily thank you. I wish I could write romances. True histories of my wanderings and waitings for ships and winds at Ferol and Corunna in Spain; at Nantes, Lorient and Brest in France; at Helvoet, the island of Goree, and Over Flackee in Holland; and...
If ever there was any philosophic solitude, your two friends have found it in this place, where we have been wind bound, a whole week, without a creature to speak to. Our whole business, pleasure and amusement has been reading Necker’s Religious Opinions, Hayley’s Old Maids, and Cumberland’s fourth Observer. Our whole stock is now exhausted, and if the ship should not arrive with a fresh...
The letter of Recall, herewith enclosed never reached my hand till this Moment when I was ready to step into the Carriage for Portsmouth where I am to embark. Its omission in Season, was wholly owing to the sickness of Mr Jay, our Secretary of State for foreign affairs. With great / Truth and Respect I have the Honour / to be, my Lord, your Lordships / most obedient and most humble / Servant...
The Letter of Recall herewith enclosed never reached my hand till this Moment when I was nearly to step into the Carriage for Portsmouth where I am to embark. Its omission in Season was wholly owing to the sickness of Mr Jay our Secretary of State for foreign affairs. I must request if you Sir to do me the honour to transmit it to their High Mightinesses with my humble and grateful Respects....
I have only Time to introduce to you and Mrs Jay, my Daughter Smith and to recommend to her your Patronage and Mrs Jays Friendship. I shall embark in Six or Eight days. I am just returned from a cold Journey to the Hague and Amsterdam, where I met with Mr Jefferson very unexpectedly. He has persuaded me, to open another Loan, which he will transmit to Congress. I am very anxious lest it should...
I have only Time to introduce to you Coll Smith and to request in his behalf the Honour of your Friendship.—His Conduct in every Part of Europe, where he has been, I have good Reasons to believe have done honour to himself and gain a favorable Idea of his Country. His Honour and Interest as well as those of his Family are very dear to me, and I wish he may be employed in some position or other...
Give me leave to introduce to you Col. Smith and his lady, two Persons in whose Welfare I am in an high degree interested. Mr. Smith as a young stranger will Stand in need of the candour and benevolence of the Citizens of New York, and as your excellencies Example and that of your Family has great influence, let me recommend her to your protection and patronage and to the Friendship of your...
I have rec d yours of the 7. th — I have written you on every Post day. M r Jefferson is so anxious to obtain Money here to enable him to discharge some of the Most urgent demands upon the United States and preserve their Credit from Bankruptcy for two Years longer after which he thinks the new Gov’t will have Money in their Treasury from Taxes; that he has prevailed upon me to open a new...
On the thirteenth Day of March in the Year one thousand seven hundred and eighty eight, appeared before me Pieter Galenus van Hole Notary of Amsterdam, admitted by the Honorable Court of Holland, His Excellency the Honorable John Adams Esquire in Quality as especially empowered and authorized by the United States of America in Congress Assembled, for and in Behalf of said States of America, to...
I have past through the Ceremonies of taking Leave of the States General, the Prince and Princess &c to the Satisfaction of all Parties—and have been feasted at Court, and all that.— made my Compliments to the Prince on the 8. of March his Birth Day, and to the Princess at her Drawing Room &c &c &c. and should have been in London at this hour if you had not have laid a Plott, which has brought...
The Subscriber, Minister Plenipotentiary from the United States of America, has the Honour to communicate to your Most Serene Highness, a Resolution of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, the original of which he has already had the Honour of laying before their High Mightinesses the States General by which he is recalled from his Mission to this Republick, and permitted to...
The Subscriber, Minister Plenipotentiary from the United States of America, has the Honour to Communicate to your High Mightinesses, an act of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, by which he is recalled from his Mission to your High Mightinesses & permitted to revisit his native Country. The Wisdom and Magnamity, with which our High Mightinesses manifested your Friendship to...
After a Passage of two days, against contrary Winds, and a terrible Jolt through the Mud, from Helvoet, I arrived here this day, in good health and not bad Spirits. The Princes Birth day is on Saturday: so that I shall not be able to take Leave before Monday, and if I go to Amsterdam afterwards, I shall not be able to leave that City before Wednesday or Thursday: so that I fear you cannot...
As the period of my Mission to His Majesty is expiring, I have requested the Honour of this Audience that I might have an opportunity in taking my leave of your Majesty of presenting to your Majesty my most humble Thanks, for the Civilities I have received at your Majestys Court and my best Wishes for every Blessing and Felicity to your Majesty and evry Branch of your Majestys Royal Family....