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    • Adams, John
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    • Warren, Mercy Otis
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    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Warren, Mercy Otis" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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It is but a very few days, Since I received your Letter of the 4. of May, which affored me, as your Letters always do, a delicious Entertainment. Your friendly Congratulations, on the Success of my feeble Efforts, are very agreable to me, and very obliging. You Say that I shall never retire, till weary Nature diminishes my Capacity of acting in dignified difficulty.— Give me leave to say, that...
Your Favour of the 1 st. of June, has not, I fear been answered. I have indeed been very happy ever Since I received it. I live here, on a kind of Pens Hill. It is a Village, remarkable for the Residence of Dauguesseau, Boileau, Molliere and Helvetius, and for nothing else. I choose it merely for my Health, as my Constitution is not able to Sustain, the nauseous Air of a great City. Amsterdam...
My Son would go home, very improperly without a Letter to M rs Warren, whose Virtues and Accomplishments his Father has so long admired. The Time is at length come in which the United States of America are to have a Minister at the Court of Great Britain. a time foretold by the Prophets and Seers, and Dreamers of Dreams but never, untill very lately Stedfastly believed by any to be so near at...
I am much obliged to you for your Letter and refer you to General Warren for what respects your son.— You suppose my present situation to be eligible and I confess it.— I have it in my Power here to enjoy the Society of Persons of great Worth, and if I please of high Rank, and if our publick Affairs here went well, I should not desire a better situation. but they do not. A Lady, who was born...
I this day received your Favour of April 8 th , and Sincerely condole with you under the Loss of your amiable son. These Afflictions are the Lot of Humanity and so little of the System of which We are a Part is Submitted to our View, that as We never can discover the Reasons of them, they are left only to our Reflections and Submission. My Situation, would be eligible, to the Heighth of my...
I am much obliged to you for your Letter and refer you to General Warren for what respects your son.— You suppose my present situation to be eligible and I confess it.— — —I have it in my Power here to enjoy the society of Persons of great Worth, and if I please of high Rank, and if our publick affairs here went well, I should not desire a better situation. but they do not. A Lady, who was...
I this day received your Favour of April 8 th. and Sincerely condole with you under the Loss of your amiable son. These Afflictions are the Lot of Humanity and so little of the System of which We are a Part is Submitted to our View, that as We never can discover the Reasons of them, they are left only to our Reflections and Submission. My Situation, would be eligible, to the Height s of my...
The Sack of Rome has so much Merit in itself that for the honour of America, I should wish to see it acted on the Stage in London beforeworld audiences. The dedication of it does so much honour to me, that I should be proud to see it in print even if it could not be acted. I have shewn it, in discreet confidence to several good Judges, but least their opinion might not be Satisfactory I...
Your friendly letter of the third and twentieth of February, I did not receive till Saturday last. To your Friend, who has now been returned from N. York these five Weeks, I have delivered your inclosed Letter as desired. She will acknowledge the Receipt of it, and transmit you the Compliments of her fellow Travellers. Our Correspondence has had a short interruption, it is true, as all others...