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    • Adams, John
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    • Adams, Samuel
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Give me Leave to introduce to you, Mr Anstey a Member of Parliament and Barrister at Law, who is Sent out by the Commissioners of American Claims to verify Facts, Such as Titles to Estates, Incumbrances upon them &c. The House of Commons Yesterday ordered an Account of Vessells cleared out for the Importation of Flour Biscuit and Live Stock from the U States into any of the Islands of...
The Child whom you used to lead out into the common to see with detestation the British Troops and with Pleasure the Boston Militia will have the Honour to deliver you this Letter. He has since seen the Troops of most Nations in Europe, without any Ambition I hope of becoming a military Man. He thinks of the Bar and Peace and civil Life, and I hope will follow and enjoy them with less...
I rec d. your letter by Mons r: de le Tombe yesterday: Every line from your hand gives me pleasure. The Embarassments thrown in the way of our trade will at least have one good effect: they will break a few deceitfull bubbles. They ought to do greater good by curing the People at large of a dangerous distemper brought upon them by the war—the itch of extravagance.— It is melancholy that no...
I have received your Letters by M r Jackson and M r Appleton. The former I answered Some days ago.— My Son who is going to London in hopes of meeting his Mother and Sister will convey this from thence.— I shall probably be fixed here, out of the reach of that Envy, which you prophecy whose Power I never felt or dreaded untill I Saw Europe.— There are little Fermentations in the Courts of...
Your advice “to reconcile myself to the Thought that Justice may not be done me, till I am dead” is friendly. I am not however apprehensive of Injustice living or dead. I am not ambitious of a Reputation for great Talents or Splendid Actions, with the present Age or with Posterity. The great Anxiety of my Life, has been to do my Duty and avoid just Reproach. and I know very well, that my Life...
D r Gordon who is arrived with your Favour of the 13 of April, will probably be disappointed in his Wishes that mutual affection may be restored; as much as he is mistaken in his opinion; that this is the only means of the Prosperity of both Countries.— America will prosper whether Love or Hatred Subsists. It is indeed improbable that mutual affection will ever be restored, not indeed So much...
I have this morning received your Favours of the 16 & 17 of April, and am fully with you in Sentiment, that “the Sooner a commercial Treaty is settled with the English, the better,” but you must be Sensible that no Treaty can be made untill Somebody or other, one or more, are authorized by Congress. While every British Minister is dancing on a slack Rope and afraid of every popular Wind, least...
I received this morning your Letter of November 4 & Dec r 4, with great Pleasure. I had heard of your Illness and was anxious to hear of your recovery. long Voyages and Journeys, great Agitation of Mind, and the Air of putrid Cities, have given me So many Severe Fits of Sickness, that I feel myself more affected At hearing of Such Misfertunes befalling my Friends. I have recovered however, a...
Give me Leave to introduce to you, M r Anstey a Member of Parliament and Barrister at Law, who is Sent out by the Commissioners of American Claims to verify Facts, Such as Titles to Estates, Incumbrances upon them &c. The House of Commons Yesterday ordered an Account of Vessells cleared out for the Importation of Flour Biscuit and Live Stock from the U States into any of the Islands of...
We were very happy to have the definitive Treaty signed, altho’ We could obtain no Improvement Amendment or Alteration. The English had got so bewitched again, & began to appear to obtain such strange hopes, from the proceedings of the Army & the difference of Sentiments between Congress & some of the States, & discovered such an Inclination to sign with France & Spain without Us, that We were...