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You will perhaps be surprised, to see that in less than 8 hours I have come 9 ½ posts. But the Roads, as far as this place, are excellent, and the horses, exceeding sprightly, because, they have very little to do: I did not expect myself, to get to this place, to-night, when I left Auteuil, but my first horses served me much better than, I had hoped. I could have gone with ease, another post...
Our winds are now contrary, and as they changed with the moon they may be three weeks as they are; which would by no means be mon compte . I am not sorry however that they have come round, because, I shall not lose my Letters from Paris, which I should have regretted extremely, if I had been obliged to leave them. When I went to see Mr. Barclay yesterday, he told me to have my baggage carried...
After a very warm and dusty Journey, setting out early, and riding late, I arrived here on Monday the 16th. instant at about 4. o’clock in the morning. As soon as I had taken a little rest, I enquired for Mr. Barclay; and immediately went for him. He would have been in Paris, before now, had he not been retained by illness: he is not yet well but seems determined to go for Paris to-morrow...
You have doubtless received before this, my Letter by Mr. Barclay, and you will have my N:2 in a day or two. I address’d it under cover to Mr. Jefferson, in case it should arrive after your departure. The morning after the date of my last, our Captain, ordered me to go on board, and at about 10 o’clock we weigh’d our anchors and set sail, but before we could get clear of the Harbour, the wind...
We are now sailing up North River; and have met the french packet about 6 leagues from New York: she will sail to morrow morning; and has sent her boat on board, while we are at sail. I profit of the only minute instant I have to inform you, that after a tedious passage of 8 weeks, we expect by noon to be at New York. I have not even time to seal the Letter I have prepared for my Sister, and...
I went on shore upon Long Island with our Captain, and visited Monsr. de Marbois, who has taken a house there for the summer. He received me with politeness, invited me to dine with him, and enquired concerning my father in as friendly a manner, as he could have done had he wish’d him well. Madame de Marbois, may be called a pretty, little woman. She was a quaker, but appears not to have...
In my last I just mentioned having been over upon Long Island, and paid a visit to Mrs. Smith, the Colls.s Mother: she was very polite to me, and appeared to miss her Son, much. All the family are in mourning for the old gentleman who died about 9 months ago. There is one Son here now, and if I mistake not, 6 daughters. Sally strikes most at first sight: she is tall; has a very fine shape, and...
Mr. Church proposes to embark on board the british Packet, which is to sail to-morrow. He has offered to take my Letters, and I suppose, he will be the bearer of dispatches from Congress.—Our Passage, though it was not a stormy one, was very tedious. Of eight weeks, that we were at Sea, we had at least four of such calm weather as not to proceed more than 8 or 10 leagues a day. As we were...
Mr. Söderström, the Sweedish Consul, has been here about a fortnight. I went this morning about a mile out of town with him, and was introduced to a Mr. Bayard. He has two Daughters that are among the toasts; one of them I think very pretty. Mr. Bayard I hear was in the late war violent on the wrong side of the Question. It is the case with a great number, of the most reputable families in the...
This morning we left Hartford New Haven, accompanied by Mr. Broome, and Mr. Brush, who wishing to take a ride to Hartford, took this opportunity, which is a very agreeable Circumstance to us. We at first intended to have gone directly to Hartford this day. But as I had a Letter for Genl. Parsons, one of the aldermen of this City, and as we were told it was worth ou r while to us e this road,...
I came into Boston this morning, and shall probably spend the week here, in order to pay all my visits, and see all those persons, that it will be necessary to show myself to. Stopping at Milton, I was very much surprized, when Mrs. Warren inform’d me, that Mr. Otis shut up last Saturday Evening: had the news come from any other Person, I should not at that time have believ’d it, for I was...
All this day has been employ’d in answering Questions respecting you, and all is not over yet. I must mention one Circumstance, although it may appear too trifling. You may Remember, that in your Letters by me, you gave an Account of the Ceremony at Nôtre Dame. All the family, were very much entertained, by your Relation, but there was a Question arose to day, what, the Ring was. One supposed...
I have been in a manner cheated out of this day by the library; for in looking over the books, and sometimes dipping into one, the fleeting hours (as the poets say) have disappeared; and night in her sable chariot, has performed a considerable part of her course. Your Uncle, went this morning to Boston, as he regularly does, and Mr. Tyler, has been very closely engaged all day. In the...
I am now settled down for the Winter, and shall be obliged to pay an unremitting attention to my Studies. I am told I have much more to do, than I had any Idea of; in order to gain an admittance with honour, next Spring in the junior Class at the University. In the Greek I have to go from the beginning to learn the Grammar, which is by no means an agreeable task; to study the new Testament...
I am afraid my dear Mamma, will accuse me again of neglect for not having written to her, since I left her, before now; several Circumstances have concurred to prevent me; and among the rest, the want of an opportunity to convey any Letters; the stagnation of commerce, has of late been so great; that no vessel since my arrival, at Boston has sailed from thence to any port in Great Britain, and...
Mr. Thaxter will want a horse in a short time, to go a journey, and I should be glad, if mine is not wanted, that Charles should come with him; as he desires to. He will then be of some service and of no expense; if Uncle Tufts thinks proper, Charles can ride the horse here, when he comes. But if he does not think it for the best, will you favour me with a Line that I may inform Mr. Thaxter....
We have had the most considerable freshet in the river that has ever been known. I mentioned in my last that it had rained for two days without intermission. The storm lasted longer up in the country, and the river being the final receptacle of all, has been continually swelling till last night. The main street has been full of water, so that at some places boats have been necessary to go from...
My two Brothers, Leonard and Charles, will leave us tomorrow for Cambridge, and you would perhaps strike me from your books, was I to let them go without writing something: and as my inclination and my interest, are in this case, both on one side of the Question, I will say some thing, though it may not be worth your reading. You know not how often I have thought of you, and wish’d for you,...
I received on Saturday evening your kind favour of the day preceding, and although I was then far, very far from being in a pleasant State of mind: yet I could not help smiling at your geometrical proof that if you shared my sorrows with me, they would not be so great. I had been much affected the day before, when Mr. Thaxter returning from Salem inform’d us of our aunt’s Death. I had read the...
It is mortifying to me, to be again obliged to offer an excuse, for not having written more frequently to you, and to my father however conscious I may be, of its having been out of my Power, yet the Idea, of your suspecting me of neglecting you, worries me very much. But it has been and still is absolutely necessary for me, to apply myself with unremitting attention to my studies. About ten...
Although I have been writing a long Letter to Charles, I still must find something to say to you, as I believe, I am in your debt. I hope however you will not stand upon ceremonies, but write whenever you can. Your benevolence will induce you to take the will for the deed, if I am not quite so punctual, as I should wish to be. I have just this moment shook hands with one Mr. Xenophon, that put...
What shall I say to justify the date of this letter, after so many fair promises to be punctual, and so many obligations to be so, from your being so exact? To skip nearly four months without writing a line. Indeed, my only plea is, that which I have already offered—a want of time. I have been, indeed, very much hurried since I came to Haverhill, and of late more than ever. At the beginning of...
I came yesterday as far as Boston with Sister Lucy, who is employ’d in fixing me off: I came here in the afternoon finally to settle. Your Brother goe to Boston this morning, and I have but a few minutes to write. All at Braintree are well, Mr. Tyler’s Windmill is to be raised this day. There’s another thing, that you would never let me know. I have got a number of articles of impeachment,...
I should, certainly have written before this, at least to show how gratefull a Sense, I retain, of the numerous obligations, I was under both to my Uncle, and Aunt, while I was at Haverhill. But what with going to Braintree, and what with having been since I ca me here, much more closely engaged, than I shall be for the future, my in tention till now has failed. About 10 this morning, the man...
What shall I say to my sister? Indeed, I am quite at a loss. I spend much more time in thinking what I shall say to you than I do in writing. I find here continually the sameness which I complained of at Haverhill. To give an account of one day, would give one of a month. Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, every minute of our time is taken up. The rest of the week, any person that chooses may...
After having suffered so long an interval of Time to pass, since I wrote you last, it is absolutely necessary, for my own justification, to give you, an account of my Studies, since my return home, and if it is not sufficient, to exculpate me intirely, I hope, at least it will induce you to forgive me. When I arrived here, I found, that I had far more to go through, than I had an Idea of...
My things, are yet pretty much in Confusion, and I do not expect to get well settled till the next Quarter. I find much more, to do here than I expected; it is true that every persons who chooses, may be idle 3 days in the 6; but every one may also, find full sufficient employment if he chooses. Mr: Williams’s Philosophical Lectures, began, Tuesday the 28th: of last month; we have already, had...
This is the eighth day it has rained and stormed without intermission, the weather is worse than that of England commonly is. The parson has been here to-day. Smoked some pipes, was sometimes witty, and always ready to laugh at his own flashes. The vacancy expires tomorrow. The weather has been such that we could not stir out of doors. I have employed my time in reading, writing and taking...
Several months have again elapsed, since, I wrote you, but I shall henceforth, be able to spare more Time, than I could since I went to Haverhill before this. There is now neither the Necessity, nor indeed the possibility, for me to keep as close, as I was in the Winter. I was obliged in the Course of 6 months, to go through the studies, which are perform’d here, in 2 years and 9 months. So...
I received this afternoon your No. 11 and I never received a letter which caused such a variety of sensations. I will only say, that I received the profile with pleasure, and the person for whom it was taken will for the future be very dear to me. It is very disagreeable to be continually making apologies for having nothing to write; but it is really so, I am more than ever out of a situation...
I am now much more at my disposal, with respect to my Time, than I was at Haverhill, and can devote more of it to writing, though, it is said, this Quarter, that is, the last of the Junior Sophister year, is most important, and busy, than any other in the four years. Mr: Williams’s Lectures on natural Philosophy, render it so; his Course consists of 24 Lectures, 13 of which we have already...
I have not written to you before, since I left you, because my Studies and European Letters have engrossed all my Time. But as you will probably soon enter this University, I wish to give you a few hints which you may improve as you please. You will consider them, not as the commands or instructions of a Preceptor, but as the advice of a friend, and a Brother. Your intimate acquaintances will...
RC (Privately owned); addressed: “Mr: Bob Longer. In the paradise of fools.” Probably an abbreviation for “Robert Shorter” (that is, Bob Shorter), a comment on JQA ’s and Cranch’s relative heights.
I received a few days agone, your favour of June 2d: you mention an Affair, concerning which I had determined to write in the begin­ ning of this Quarter. I have thought much of an Office in which to Study the Law. Should you return home next Spring, and be yourself at Leisure to instruct me, I should certainly prefer that to studying any where else. But if you are still detained in Europe, I...
Three months have now elapsed, since, I have received, one line from Europe; and the only information I have had in all that time, were a couple of paragraphs in the newspapers, the one mentioning your departure from London, and the other your return there; I feel very impatient and anxious for letters, a vessel arrived a few days since; but, I do not hear, that she brought any: if I have been...
I determined about a fortnight agone, to sit down, and write you a letter, expressing my anxiety and surprize, that for three months I had not received one line from my friends in Europe; I did in fact in a letter to Mamma, make my complaint, but a day or two afterwards I was made happy, with two excellent letters, the one from her, and the other from you. But instead of making apologies for...
I am at length released from the multiplicity of business which has employ’d so much of my time, for the last eighteen months: during that period I had scarcely a leisure moment, and was forced to a degree of application, which has been injurious to my health. but as I am left at present free from every employment, I shall have time to recruit; and I shall also be able to give more frequent...
At length the scene of my collegiate life is closed, and about a fortnight ago I made a public exit from the university: by the public papers you will have some account of the performances of the day. In one of them (the centinel) you will see it very positively asserted that Freeman, who spoke the other oration is my indisputable superior in style, elegance and oratory. in another paper that...
If it should be convenient to you, I would be obliged to you for a supply of money. I endeavour to avoid all expences, but such as are really necessary; yet I am not only exhausted, but somewhat in debt.— I can scarcely tell how the money goes, but I have an account of all my expences, which assures me that none has been lost. Your brother informs me that it will be more convenient for him to...
It is a long time since I wrote you last, but I am perfectly weary of making apologies. I have no doubt but my friends will forgive me, when they recollect the causes which have prevented me from informing them frequently of those trivial events, which the partiality of friendship alone can render interesting. When I was last in Boston, which was about two months ago, I wrote a few hasty lines...
I desired my brother Charles when he went from Haverhill, to mention, that I was again in need of a supply of money, and since that time I have been obliged to stop my payments: I am apprehensive he forgot to deliver my message, and take this opportunity to request some money, as soon as may be convenient. The riotous ungovernable spirit, which appeared among the students at the university in...
We have mutually been deficient in those attentions, which absent connections ought always to preserve towards one another: the fault has been the greatest on my side, as I was under the additional obligation of setting a good example; but I feel myself at this time peculiarly bound to write to you, to apologize for the rough expressions which upon several occasions I used while I was with...
M r: Lincoln, the bearer, is a young preacher, who belongs to Hingham; he is going home, and I cannot suffer the opportunity to pass unimproved; though I have little to say: except that I have been unwell: my nerves have been disordered, and the words of Henry have [. . .] obtruded themselves upon my mind, at the midnight hour. I came here last Saturday, and have such excellent care taken of...
I expected to have received ere this some Letters either from Braintree or Boston; But excepting what I have collected from the Newspapers I have heard neither directly nor indirectly from either. Had any good opportunity for sending, presented itself I should have written, although the only topic of information, would have been concerning myself.— The sum total of my news is that since I...