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ALS : American Philosophical Society Yours of the 15th. informing me of your agreable Journey and safe Arrival at Hexham gave me great Pleasure, and would make your good Mother happy if I knew how to convey it to her; but ’tis such an out-of-the-way Place she is gone to, and the Name so out of my Head, that the Good News must wait her Return. Enclos’d I send you a Letter which came before she...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Thanks to you for the Garters, and for the Lines that accompany them; the Knitting of the latter is as even and as pretty as that of the former, and the Work much more durable, for with me it will never wear out. Your Mama is pretty well, and gone abroad. We purpose to be at Kensington tomorrow and hope to have the Pleasure of finding you all well. I am...
ALS : Yale University Library Your good Mama has just been saying to me that she wonders what can possibly be the Reason she has not had a Line from you for so long a time. I have made no Complaint of that kind, being conscious that by not writing my self I have forfeited all Claim to such Favour; tho’ no Letters give me more Pleasure, and I often wish to hear from you, but Indolence grows...
ALS : Henry N. Haiken, New York City (1957) This is the best Paper I can get at this wretched Inn, but it will convey what is intrusted to it as faithfully as the finest. It will tell my Polly, how much her Friend is afflicted, that he must, perhaps never again, see one for whom he has so sincere an Affection, join’d to so perfect an Esteem; whom he once flatter’d himself might become his own...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I embrace most gladly my dear Friend’s Proposal of a Subject for our future Correspondence; not only as it will occasion my hearing from her more frequently, but as it will lay me under a Necessity of improving my own Knowledge that I may be better able to assist in her Improvement. I only fear my necessary Business and Journeys with the natural Indolence...
AL : American Philosophical Society Inclos’d is a Letter from Mr. Coleman; it came under Cover of one to me, and the Seal of mine sticking to that of yours makes an Appearance as if yours had been broke open. Your Mother and I long’d indeed to know what it contain’d, but we were, as you express it, too formal , and would not poison your Crib , tho’ we think we have a Right to see it. My...
ALS : Yale University Library As you have been so good as to forgive my long Delay of writing to you and answering your always agreable Letters, I shall not now trouble you with the Apology I had written on that head in one of my Pieces of Letters never finish’d. Supposing the Fact, that the Water of the Well at Bristol is warmer after some time pumping, I think your manner of accounting for...
ALS : Library of Congress At length I have found an Hour, in which I think I may chat with my dear good Girl; free from Interruption. The Attention you have always shown to every thing you think agreable to me, demands my most grateful Acknowledgements. I have receiv’d the Garters you have so kindly knit for me; they are of the only Sort that I can wear, having worn none of any kind for 20...
ALS : Library of Congress It is, as you observed in our late Conversation, a very general Opinion, that all Rivers run into the Sea , or deposite their Waters there. ’Tis a kind of Audacity to call such general Opinions in question, and may subject one to Censure: But we must hazard something in what we think the Cause of Truth: And if we propose our Objections modestly, we shall, tho’...
ALS : Library of Congress I have your agreable Letter from Bristol, which I take this first Leisure Hour to answer, having for some time been much engag’d in Business. Your first Question, What is the Reason the Water at this Place, tho’ cold at the Spring, becomes warm by Pumping? it will be most prudent in me to forbear attempting to answer, till, by a more circumstantial Account, you assure...
ALS : Library of Congress I wrote a few Lines to you last Week in answer to yours of the 15th. Since which I have been in the Country; and returning yesterday found your good Mother was come home and had got a Letter from you of the 20th. She has just put it into my hands, and desires me to write to you, as she is going into the City with Miss Barwell to buy things. Whether she will have time...
Transcribed from the text in phonetic spelling in Benjamin Vaughan, ed., Political, Miscellaneous, and Philosophical Pieces … by Benj. Franklin, LL.D. and F.R.S. (London, 1779), pp. 473–8. Dh i a bd sh ek sh yi n iu meek to rektif yi ii ng a ur alfabet, “ dh at it uil bi atended ui
ALS : Yale University Library Just come home from a Venison Feast, where I have drank more than a Philosopher ought, I find my dear Polly’s chearful chatty Letter that exhilarates me more than all the Wine. Your good Mother says there is no Occasion for any Intercession of mine in your behalf. She is sensible that she is more in fault than her Daughter. She received an affectionate tender...
MS not found; reprinted from Smyth, Writings , III , 478–9. Hearing that you was in the Park last Sunday, I hop’d for the Pleasure of seeing you yesterday at the Oratorio in the Foundling Hospital; but, tho’ I look’d with all the Eyes I had, not excepting even those I carry in my Pocket I could not find you; and this Morning your good Mama, has receiv’d a Line from you, by which we learn that...
Transcribed from ALS (in phonetic spelling): American Philosophical Society Many writers, from the monk Orm in the early thirteenth century to George Bernard Shaw in the early twentieth, have experimented with methods of phonetic spelling. It was perhaps natural that Franklin, with his long exposure to the printed word and his varied and practical interests, should have been drawn into this...
ALS : Library of Congress ’Tis a very sensible Question you ask, how the Air can affect the Barometer, when its Opening appears covered with Wood? If indeed it was so closely covered as to admit of no Communication of the outward Air to the Surface of the Mercury, the Change of Weight in the Air could not possibly affect it. But the least Crevice is sufficient for the Purpose; a Pinhole will...
ALS : Library of Congress; incomplete copy: American Philosophical Society I am always pleas’d with a Letter from you, and I flatter myself you may be sometimes pleas’d in receiving one from me, tho’ it should be of little Importance, such as this, which is to consist of a few occasional Remarks made here and in my Journey hither. Soon after I left you in that agreable Society at Bromley, I...
Draft: Library of Congress; copy: American Philosophical Society Did you ever see People at work with Spades and Pickaxes, digging a Cellar? When they have loosen’d the Earth perhaps a foot deep, that loose Earth must be carried off, or they can go no deeper; it is in their way, and hinders the Operation of the Instruments. When the first foot of loose Earth is removed, they can dig and loosen...
ALS : Yale University Library Your pleasing Favour of Nov. 11 is now before me. It found me as you suppos’d it would, happy with my American Friends and Family about me; and it made me more happy in showing me that I am not yet forgotten by the dear Friends I left in England. And indeed why should I fear they will ever forget me, when I feel so strongly that I shall ever remember them! I...
ALS : Princeton University Library I did not receive your Letter of the 26th till I came home late last Night, too late to answer it by the Return of that Post. I see very clearly the Unhappiness of your Situation, and that it does not arise from any Fault in you. I pity you most sincerely: I should not, however, have thought of giving you Advice on this Occasion if you had not requested it,...
ALS : Yale University Library I received yesterday my Papers. I had sent for them before to Mr. Stanley’s, but Peter found no one at home. It has however been of no Damage to me, except being so long without the Pleasure of reading your agreable little Letter that accompanied them. We are to set out this Week for Holland, where we may possibly spend a Month, but purpose to be at home again...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I arrived here yesterday in my Return from the North. This Morning I had the Pleasure of receiving yours of the 6th. I am sorry that my Engagements here will not permit to be in London on your Wedding Day, but I repeat my Wishes of Happiness to you on that Occasion, and pray that you may have many Returns of that Day each happier than its Predecessor, from...
AL (incomplete?): American Philosophical Society Voltaire in his Questions sur l’Encyclopedie , which I have been reading this Morning, gives Translations of several Greek Epigrams into French, to show that the latter Language was as capable of Correctness as the former. I had a mind to try if [I could] not render them more concisely in English, [but have] not succeeded; but you (or some of...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I came to this Place on Saturday night right well and untir’d with a 70 miles Journey that day. I met with your and my Dolly’s joint Letter which would have refresh’d me with its Kindness if I had been ever so weary. The Account you give of a certain Lady’s having entertain’d a new Gallant in my Absence, did not surprize me: For I have been us’d to Rivals;...