Benjamin Franklin Papers
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Josiah Franklin Davenport to Deborah Franklin, 22 March 1759

Josiah Franklin Davenport6 to Deborah Franklin

ALS: American Philosophical Society

March. 22d. 1759

Honoured Aunt

I have been Confin’d since Saturday last with a fever, altho now abated I am advised by Doctor Redman7 not to go abroad, Which is the Occasion I now write my Business.

I have sold my House to Mr. Waiscott,8 and he has just been here and tells me the deeds are finish’d, and that he is to undertake a Journey on Saturday morning from Which he Shall not return for some time, and Withal has agreed with Workmen to repair the House in his Absence, And as there is a Ballance due to Uncle on it,9 we want that Settled before the deed is executed. I left with Uncle the Lease &c. and when he went away I Told him I should sell the House before his return, to which he approv’d and told me he should leave the papers With You, and that you and I could settle as Well as if he was Present.

I should be Glad if you’d please to look them up, as the Deed must be executed tomorrow, and if it don’t suit you to Come here perhaps you can Get Mr. Dunlap;1 The money is ready to discharge it. It will be a detriment to Mr. Waiscott if it is not finished to morrow. I am Honoured Madam Your Dutifull Nephew

J.F. Davenport

Instrument to Uncle. Bond’s two £100 each one for Security one from Dr. Kearsley.2 Waiscotts Lease.

Addressed: To / Mrs. Deborah Franklin / Per Pent3

[Note numbering follows the Franklin Papers source.]

6BF’s nephew (C.12.4). He was now secretary to the Pa. Indian commissioners.

7John Redman was a leading Philadelphia physician; see above, V, 356 n.

8Not identified.

9Davenport had conveyed the rent of this house to BF to repay the principal and interest on a loan from his uncle. In his will of 1757 BF directed his executors to pay the interest towards the support and education of one of Davenport’s children, recently blinded by smallpox. In the same will he made his nephew a contingent beneficiary of the income of his printing house and bequeathed each of Davenport’s children outright the sum of £10. See above, VII, 202–3.

1William Dunlap, husband of one of DF’s nieces and postmaster of Philadelphia; see above, V, 199 n; VII, 168–9.

2Either Dr. John Kearsley (above, V, 20 n) or his nephew of the same name (above, VII, 110 n).

3Not identified.

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