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ALS (incomplete): Yale University Library This fragment is now bound, in a volume of Franklin’s correspondence with Shipley, as a postscript to the Bishop’s holograph copy of his letter below at the end of June, 1775. But the paper is larger than that of the copy; it has been folded, as the copy has not; and it is addressed and has the remnants of a seal. The conclusion is inescapable that it...
ALS (incomplete): American Philosophical Society [ Missing ] ourselves without making Mr. W—s experiment. But to be serious; unluckily for that Gentleman I have drawn no conclusion from his favourite experiment, except it be this, that a point will not invite a stroke of lightning upon it, at 12 times the distance of a knob. The chains happen’d to be both of the same wire, and length. Whoever...
Printed form with MS insertions in blanks: American Philosophical Society Vous étes prié, de la part de Monsieur le Curé & de Madame Le Veillard , Trésoriere des Pauvres, de vous trouver à l’Assemblée de Charité qui se tiendra dans l’Eglise Royale & Paroissiale de Notre-Dame-de-Graces de Passy, à l’issue des Vépres, Dimanche prochain 5 7bre 1779 Il y aura Prédication, par mr L’abbé gautier...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The condescending respect with which Your Excellency hath in repeated Instances regarded me and mine is matter of gratful contemplation. Permit us to look with sincerest Veneration to the Man distinguish’d amongst a glorious Band of firm Characters: who sustain’d by divine Providence, have thus farr, form’d and Fostered the Rising world of Freedom. May...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The Bearer is Baron Steieben of whome I had the honor to write to you by the hands of a Friend about a month since. He is a Gentleman of Family, Merit and great experience, well known to some of the First Personages in Europe, and hereby gives you sir a strong proof of his Ambition to make the Acquaintance of Doctor Franklin in actualy performing a Journey...
Incomplete draft: American Philosophical Society Illustrissimo Signor Signor Padrone mio Colendissimo. A quest’ora avrete ricevuto risposta alle vostre direttavi per mezzo [ blank in MS ] riceverete anche questa per l’istesso canale, e potrete rispondermi per il medesimo; che così La spesa sarà tutta addosso a me, e riceverò lettere sicuramente; perciocchè le due penultime vostre hanno tardato,...
AL (fragment): Historical Society of Pennsylvania [ First part missing ] Franklyn for the Favor of his Invitation, sho’d have answer’d his Card sooner but has been kept at Westminster the whole Day, begs Leave now to say, that He will wait on the Doctor, and in the mean Time begs his Acceptance of his most respectful Compliments. The writer has not been identified, though the handwriting bears...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. Fitzgerald and Dr. Morton’s Compliments to Dr. Franklyn, and if it be agreable, purpose to wait upon Him on Friday even next, about 6 o’clock, with 2 Ladies. Addressed: To / Benjamn. Franklyn / Esqr. Dr. of Laws. / Craven Street The first of these men may have been Keane Fitz Gerald, or Fitzgerald, of Poland St., London, F.R.S., 1756, who contributed...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I [hope you] will not be angrey at my writing b [ missing ] me, I know you ar Intament with mr. St[rahan] [ missing ] god will kepe me in my troubell but k [ missing ] e to help myself the least thing Cant dres now [ missing ] [ with ] out help, If mr. troauen will be so Cind as to [ missing ] for to Ogment my salery I am told it is great [ly?] in his pour,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I hop you will pardin my fredom in writin to you, should be glad to have waited on you but never shall see you moer so bad with the stoan not abell to goe to the hall for my penshon but the treasourer is so Cind as to send it god reward him for it, I had a long winter never been out tell march with my breth nor abell to go to bed know mor then a child, and...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I hop you will pardon the fredom I have takeen, I have been to the bishop’s palies at lamboth to see for the old Cook that did Lieve with the late bishop, but to my mortifycasion am Desieved she is gon, I went to see If I Could have got my daughter to been under for som tiem to had som Experence in the Chiken bisnes it would have been of great servies to...
Printed card with MS insertions: Historical Society of Pennsylvania Takes the Liberty to inform Dr. Franklin and friends that he has Three very large and Capital Pictures just arrived, and to be seen at an empty House, almost opposite the Cocoa Tree, Pall Mall , from Ten in the Morning till Three o’Clock. On John Greenwood, Boston-born painter and art dealer, who moved from Amsterdam to London...
AL : American Philosophical Society None of the following notes can be dated with precision; it is possible that some may have been written during BF ’s first mission, while others may have been composed as late as 1775. They are placed here because they seem to the editors to belong to the second mission, and in accordance with editorial practice because this is the earliest year in which...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. Cooper presents his Compliments to Dr. Franklin and returns him many thanks for the honor of his obliging Enquiries. Addressed: Dr. Frankln’s For Grey Cooper, M.P., 1765–84; secretary to the Treasury, 1765–82; see above, X , 182 n.
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. and Mrs. Mead’s Compliments to Mrs. Stephinson, and Doctor Franklin, and are sorry the day the Doctor was at leisure to have done them the favour of a Visit, did not fall out, to have accepted it; They hope the first convenient time the Doctor hath, he will; and that Mrs. Stephenson will be so good to bring the young Gentleman she mentioned! Mr. and Mrs....
ALS : American Philosophical Society Govr. Pownall presents his Compliments to Mr. Franklin and shou’d be very glad to the favour of his company to Dinner to Day. If he is engaged Govr. Pownall shou’d be very glad to see him any Part of this Evening if not otherwise engaged. [ Memo in Franklin’s hand: ] Forts. and Indian Expenses. Ministers make an impossible Act and run mad that it will not...
ALS : American Philosophical Society If you have nothing better to do will you be so good to call on me this Morning and take a Family Dinner with us. I would call on you but having the symptoms of a great Minister strong upon by name the Gout I am not able to walk. I wish much to see you. Your friend and Servant Addressed: To / B Franklin Esqr / &c William Pitt, a famous sufferer from the...
AL : American Philosophical Society Govr. Pownall presents his Compliments to Dr. Franklin finds he shall necessarily be detained at home here to too late an hour for breakfasting with Dr. Franklin. But will if not inconvenient call upon him about eleven. Addressed: Dr Franklin / at Mrs Stevenson’s / Craven Street/ Strand
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. Strahan presents his best Compliments to Dr. Franklin, and begs he would send the Letter by the Bearer. This note might have been written at any time when BF was in London after he had received his honorary doctorate from the University of St. Andrews in February 1759. It is possible that the letter Strahan referred to was one of BF ’s communications to...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. and Mrs. Strahan present their Compliments to Dr. Franklin and the Ladies, and conceiving it may be more agreeable and convenient for them, will not dine till three o’Clock to day. Addressed: To / Dr. Franklin / or / Mrs. Stevenson Apparently “the Ladies” were Mrs. Stevenson and her daughter Mary (Polly), if the note was written before the latter’s...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. and Mrs. Wood present their Compliments to Dr. Frankland and beg the favour of his Company to dinner to morrow at three o’ Clock. An undated note from Mrs. Stevenson of about 1767–70 mentions a Mr. Wood who called while BF was away from Craven Street for a few days. The caller told her that BF knew where he lodged and that they had seen each other in...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mrs. French thinks it long since she had the pleasure of seeing Dr. Frankin, called at his house to desire the favor of his Company to dinner tomorrow to meet Mr. Payne to play at Chess till half an hour after 7 o’ [ clock ]. Will be happy to see him as [early?] in the Morning as is agreeable. Addressed: To. Dr. Franklin For BF ’s old friend see above, XVIII...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The letters that follow we have found impossible to date. All of them, presumably, were written after Polly Stevenson’s marriage in 1770, when Dolly began to pay Franklin more attention than before “tho not more than I have always been prompted from affection to Pay.” Prior to the wedding no correspondence exists between them, or at least none that can be...
AL : American Philosophical Society <Jermyn Street, Wednesday morning, in the third person. Invites Franklin to dinner next Monday. > BF ’s friendship with the Shipleys appears to have begun in 1771, and we are therefore printing the invitation under the earliest likely date.
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am very happy that my letter to Lord Thanet meets with your approbation. I send you here some crude notions of what ought be adopted. 1st  A solemn league and covenant defensive and offensive to be taken by every man in America, particularly by those in or near the Sea Port Towns; all those who refuse, to have their estates confiscated for the public use,...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mrs. Montagu presents her compliments to Dr. Franklyn, and is afraid he will think her troublesome in desiring the favour of his company on Sunday next the 19th, as well as on this day sennight. Mr. Bolton, who has promised to dine with Mrs. Montagu on sunday, will be best rewarded for his civility by meeting Dr. Franklyn, and so great an Artist as Mr....
ALS : American Philosophical Society The Bearer Mr. William Whitchurch finding his Health much impaired by his assiduous application to his Business has been induced to make a Voyage to America; I believe you are not unacquainted with his Works as a Writing Engraver and if he finds the Climate agrees with him and that he can find suitable occupation he may remain at Philadelphia and I hope may...
ALS : American Philosophical Society As Major Trent is the Bearer of this Letter, it is the less Necessary for Me now to be very particular in my Communications. I presented, as you desired, your Respects to Lord Camden, and his Lordship requested Me to tell You, that He should have been much pleased to have seen you, before you embarked; That the Chancellor’s Decission in your Case is...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Your very agreable favour of the 4th. of Janry. I rec’d by the last Packet informing of your having drawn on me for the Ballance of our Acct. as it Stands in your Books a Copy of which I rec’d by a Ship Via Philada. Mr. Bache will inform you that at his desire the Bill was paid in Philadelphia when due. The Acct. as you say may be easyly rectify’d when we...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I wrote you the other day about an hundred pounds which the Constitutional Society here had orderd to be given for releif of the poor sufferers in Boston and now inclose you Mr. Olivers letter respecting that business. I presume you are fully informed from other hands of all the public transactions here since you left us. Therefore shall only beg you to...
ALS (facsimile): Massachusetts Historical Society Altho’ I have not the pleasure either of a personal or epistolary acquaintance with you, I have taken the liberty of sending you by Mr. Dana a pamphlet which I wish was more deserving of your notice. The ability and firmness with which you have defended the Rights of Mankind and the Liberties of this Country in particular have rendered you dear...
ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society; draft: British Museum I wrote you in Septr and Aug: last, and it is a great While indeed since I have had the Pleasure of a Line from you. The Anxiety and Distress bro’t upon us by the Port Bill and other Acts, and the Troops and Ships of War station’d here have been great; and much Art and Pains have been employ’d to dismay us, or provoke us to some...
ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society I did my self the honor to write you, 13 Septr last, by Mr. Quincy, acknowleging the receit of several curious Pamphlets, for which am much obliged to you, and beg the favor of you to present my respectful Compliments to Sir John Pringle, and Mr. Henley, for the particular honor they have done me, in sending me their curious Productions. Since that, I...
ALS : American Philosophical Society By the favor of Mr. Wister I transmitt the Votes and Laws of the last Session of Assembly, Which I hope will be delivered safely to you together with this inclosing a Duplicate of the petition to the King. In my last I Stated Mr. Wilmotts Affair fully, hope he will see by it that the Colony has not been to blame and that he will speedily receive his Money....
ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society My dear Son has repeatedly acknowledged your friendly Reception and Patronage of him, since his Arrival in London: Be pleased, therefore, to accept of my gratefull Sense of your Goodness to him; with my ardent Wishes, that your united Endeavors to preserve your native Country from impending Ruin may be attended with Success. You would hardly be perswaded...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Votre derniere lettre m’ayant eté remise par Mr. Williams m’a fait un plaisir singulier. L’avantage qu’il a de vous appartenir de si près formoit un prejugé bien favorable pour lui, sa physiognomie ne previent pas moins en sa faveur, les qualités de son esprit et la douceur de ses moeurs y repondent parfaitement. Il se fait aimer generalement icy des hommes...
ALS and extract: Library of Congress Be kind enough to take the charge of the inclosed and convey them at thy leisure. [ Deleted ] is a staunch Anti American. I have received a letter from him to day by way of Liverpool which hurts me much. Get him, Jas. Pemberton and two or three more together, and inform them, that whatever specious pretences are offerd, they are all hollow and that to get a...
Letterbook copy: General Post Office, London Mr. Todd presents his Compliments to Dr. Franklin and sends him an extract of a Letter to Messrs. Foxcroft and Finlay of the 9th. of Decr. last concerning the Balance remaining in his Hands to which he has not as yet received an Answer, but makes no doubt when it comes it will clear up every Difficulty in settling his Accounts finally with this...
Printed in the Royal Society, Philosophical Transactions …, LXV (1775), pp. 277–9. Presuming the mode of raising water by its momentum may be new and useful to many individuals, induces me to send you the inclosed plan and description of a work, executed in the year 1772, at Oulton, in Cheshire, the seat of Philip Egerton, Esq. for the service of a brewhouse and other offices, and is found to...
AL : Library of Congress D: Barclay’s respects, and acquaints Dr. Franklin, that Dr. Fothergill desires the favor of his Company Tomorrow Evening at half past 7 Clock, when D B will meet him if that Time is agreable to Dr. Franklin. Addressed: Doctr. Franklin / Cravenstreet Endorsed: March 75 The purpose of this last meeting was a sad one, to send word by BF to their American friends that the...
ALS and copy: Library of Congress Franklin’s anger at the ministry did not rob him of all circumspection. Before he sent the above memorial to Dartmouth he showed it to Thomas Walpole, who “lookt at it and at me several Times alternately, as if he apprehended me a little out of my Senses.” The American asked him to get a second opinion from Lord Camden; Walpole did so, and returned the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The foregoing is a Copy of what I had the honour to write you under the 9 Decbr. And without your Answer I take now the Liberty to send you 6 Exempl. of my Piece Concerning the pouring of oil &c. where after a translation of your Letter to Mr. Brownrigg. I hope the one and the other will be of utility for the publicq, and give inducements to exact...
AL and copy: Library of Congress Although Lord Howe recognized that negotiations had broken down, he refused to abandon hope for the future. The following note brought on a meeting with Franklin on March 7, which was their last in England, as far as we know, but not their last. The Admiral asked whether, if he were sent as commissioner to the colonies, he might count on the other’s assistance,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am just now informed by Mr. Bache of a Vessel preparing to Sail for London tomorrow, and lest I should not have an other opportunity so soon as I might wish, I have taken this, to acquaint you as laconically as I can of the Service your good favours have been to me, and my Gratitude on that account. Even thanks may be rendered troublesome, by being...
ALS : American Philosophical Society An Opportunity offering, and the Committee not to be met with I take the Liberty of transmitting you the Letter and of signing myself your most obedient humble Servant Addressed: For / Doctor Benjamin Franklin / Craven Street / London Endorsed: Lib. Company  Mar. 4. 1775 A young Philadelphia lawyer of that name is mentioned in PMHB , LXXIV (1950), 383 n,...
AL : University of Pennsylvania Library Mrs. Deane presents her Compliments to Dr. Franklin with many thanks to him, for the benefit she hopes, she has received, from the perusal of Richards Maxims , which are so Excellent they ought to be framed and hung up in every House. Mrs. Deane is much obliged to Dr. Franklin for his kind remembrance of her, and hopes he will Consider of the other...
AL and copy: Library of Congress A week passed after Howe’s discouraging note of February 20. When Franklin heard nothing from him and nothing of moment from Barclay or Fothergill, he inquired of Mrs. Howe whether he could be of any further use to her brother; if not, he would consider himself free “to take other Measures.” She forwarded this cryptic message and, in the following note, Howe’s...
ALS : American Philosophical Society When compliments on your superior merit, as a Philosopher, are so strictly just as not to exceed the limits of honest praise, I am confident that my friend the Chevalier de Chatellux, who has joined the multitude in applauding you, would be pleased that you should read his sentiments of you, in their English dress. There is a glorious feeling of the mind...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress By February 20 Howe’s negotiations were breaking down. Perhaps for that reason he abandoned communication through his sister, and for the first time wrote Franklin directly. Lord Hyde, he reported with delicate circumlocution, saw no point in meeting with one whose views were irreconcilable with those of the government. Franklin...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am now to acknowledge the receipt of your Favor of the 12 November last; We have received the King’s Speech and the answer of Both Houses. They have made no alteration in the Sentiments of the People here they remain as firm and United as ever. The association of the Continental Congress is sacredly adhered to thro[ughout] all the Colonies. The Assembly...