You
have
selected

  • Period

    • Colonial
    • Colonial

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Period="Colonial" AND Period="Colonial"
Results 21-70 of 16,111 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
How many months have passed away since I have either written or received a line from my Dear Caliope? What various Scenes have I passed thro? Your Diana become a Mamma—can you credit it? Indeed it is a sober truth. Bless’d with a charming Girl whose pretty Smiles already delight my Heart, who is the Dear Image of her still Dearer Pappa. You my Friend are well acquainted with all the tender...
I am much obliged to you for the care you have taken about help. I am very willing to submit to some inconveniences in order to lessen your expences, which I am sensible have run very high for these 12 months past and tho you know I have no particuliar fancy for Judah yet considering all things, and that your Mamma and you seem to think it would be best to take her, I shall not at present look...
Tomorrow being Commencment, suppose this will not fail thro want of a conveyance. I therefore set, to tell you that I was much obliged by your kind Letter. When ever I receive a Letter from you it seems to give new Springs to my nerves, and a brisker circulation to my Blood, tis a kind of pleasing pain that I feel, and I some how, or other catch the infection which you speak of, and I feel so...
I received your very obliging Letter and thank you for the early intelligence of your designed Tour. I could wish to be a fellow Traveller with you; tho I cannot personally partake, of your joyful reception, I feel no small pleasure in the anticipation of yours. I commit to your care a Letter which I would not trust to any hand less safe than yours. You will carry it Sir with my tenderest...
You was pleas’d to say that the receipt of a letter from your Diana always gave you pleasure. Whether this was designed for a complement, (a commodity I acknowledg that you very seldom deal in) or as a real truth, you best know. Yet if I was to judge of a certain persons Heart, by what upon the like occasion passess through a cabinet of my own, I should be apt to suspect it as a truth. And why...
I heard to Day that the Doctor had a Letter from Mr. Cranch, and that he was still very Ill, poor Man. I am grieved for him, and for you my dear Sister, who I know share with him in all his troubles. It seem s worse to me when I hear you are unwell now than it used to, when I could go and see you. Tis a hard thing to be weaned from any thing we Love, time nor distance has not yet had that...
I dare not express to you at 300 hundred miles distance how ardently I long for your return. I have some very miserly Wishes; and cannot consent to your spending one hour in Town till at least I have had you 12. The Idea plays about my Heart, unnerves my hand whilst I write, awakens all the tender sentiments that years have encreased and matured, and which when with me were every day...
I wrote you last Sabbeth evening in a good deal of pertubation of Spirits. I fear I did wrong in sending it you; I then promised to acquaint you with the result as soon as I knew it. Mr. Adams returnd a monday night in order to Relieve me from my apprehensions. It does not appear that there was any premediated design to raise a Tumult. An officer very drunk sallied forth, and was seen in that...
I was yesterday at Weymouth where I received your Letter, and the saffron risbands &c. I thank you and Cousin Betsy both; I expect you a thursday, but from all I can find out, I do not think the visit will be to any purpose; there seems to me to be at present a real aversion to change of state. having quited one has no inclination for an other; so things look to me. I am really sorry upon all...
The die is cast. Yesterday brought us such a Speach from the Throne as will stain with everlasting infamy the reign of G e orge the 3 determined to carry into Execution “the acts passd by the late parliment, and to Mantain the authority of the Legislature over all his dominions.” The reply of the house of commons and the house of Lords shew us the most wicked and hostile measures will be...
How do you now? For my part, I feel much easier than I did an hour ago, My Unkle haveing given me a more particuliar, and favorable account of the Small pox, or rather the operation of the preparation, than I have had before. He speaks greatly in favor of Dr. Perkins who has not, as he has heard lost one patient. He has had since he has been in Town frequent opportunities of visiting in the...
The Doctor talks of Setting out tomorrow for New Braintree. I did not know but that he might chance to see you, in his way there. I know from the tender affection you bear me, and our little one’s that you will rejoice to hear that we are well, our Son is much better than when you left home, and our Daughter rock’s him to Sleep, with the Song of “Come pappa come home to Brother Johnny.” Sunday...
I know not where this will find you whether upon the road, or at Phylidelphia, but where-ever it is I hope it will find you in good Health and Spirits. Your Journey I immagine must have been very tedious from the extreem heat of the weather and the dustiness of the road’s. We are burnt up with the drouth, having had no rain since you left us, nor is there the least apperance of any. I was much...
If our wishes could have conveyed you to us, you would not have been absent to Day. Mr. Cranch and my Sister have been here, where they hoped to have found you. We talk’d of you, they desire to be rememberd to you, and wish you well thro the Distemper. Mr. Cranch told me that the Deacon with his children design for Boston next Saturday and that they propose going by water—that the Deacon would...
I suppose you have written to me, tho I have not received it, for Mr. Ayers left his pocket Book with the Letters at Roxbury. However full in the Faith that I have a Letter there, I return you my thanks for it. We are all very sollicitious to hear from you; Brother has they tell us two eruptions; upon which I congratulate him. I hear also that he is in high Spirits, and more agreeable than...
Here am I all alone, in my Chamber, a mere Nun I assure you, after professing myself thus will it not be out of Character to confess that my thoughts are often employ’d about Lysander, “out of the abundance of the Heart, the mouth speaketh,” and why Not the Mind thinketh. Received the pacquet you so generously bestowed upon me. To say I Fasted after such an entertainment, would be wronging my...
I am very impatient to receive a letter from you. You indulged me so much in that Way in your last absence, that I now think I have a right to hear as often from you as you have leisure and opportunity to write. I hear that Mr. Adams wrote to his Son and the Speaker to his Lady, but perhaps you did not know of the opportunity. Suppose you have before this time received two letters from me, and...
The kind reception I met with at your House, and the Hospitality with which you entertained me, demands my gratefull acknowledgment. By requesting a correspondence you have kindly given me an opportunity to thank you for the happy Hours I enjoyed whilst at your House. Thus imbolden’d I venture to stretch my pinions, and tho like the timorous Bird I fail in the attempt and tumble to the ground...
I think I write to you every Day. Shall not I make my Letters very cheep; don’t you light your pipe with them? I care not if you do, tis a pleasure to me to write, yet I wonder I write to you with so little restraint, for as a critick I fear you more than any other person on Earth, and tis the only character, in which I ever did, or ever will fear you. What say you? Do you approve of that...
Do not my Worthy Friend tax me with either Breach of promise; or neglect towards you, the only reason why I did not write to you immediately upon your leaving Town, was my being seized with a Fever which has confined me almost ever since, I have not for these many years known so severe a fit of Sickness. I am now thro’ the favour of Heaven so far restored as to be able to leave my chamber some...
Your Friendly Epistle reach’d me a fryday morning, it came like an Infernal Mesenger, thro fire and Brimstone, Yet it brought me tidings of great joy. With gratitude may this month be ever rememberd by Diana. You have been peculiarly favourd, and may be numberd with those who have had the distemper lightest. What would I give that I was as well thro it. I thank you for your offerd Service, but...
Your agreable favour of January 19 demands from me more than I am able to pay. My coin will have more alloy tho it bears the same Stamp of Friendship with your own. I was not sensible till I received yours that my last Letter to you abounded with so many terrors. I am not Naturally of a gloomy temper nor disposed to view objects upon the dark Side only. I rejoice that all my fears on that...
Your desire that I would write every Opportunity is punctually observed by me, And I comply with your request, altho I have nothing more to say than How do ye? and when will you return? These questions perhaps may appear trifling to others, yet to me they are matters of the highest importance. The Doctor just now sent me your Epistle, and word, that tho he had smoked it, yet he had not read a...
When I wrote you by the Doctor I was in hopes that I should have been out the next day, but my disorder did not leave me as I expected and I am still confind extreemly weak, and I believe low spirited. The Doctor encourages me, tells me I shall be better in a few days. I hope to find his words true, but at present I feel, I dont know how, hardly myself. I would not have the Cart come a tuesday...
I have just returnd from a visit to my Brother, with my Father who carried me there the day before yesterday, and call’d here in my return to see this much injured Town. I view it with much the same sensations that I should the body of a departed Friend, only put of f its present Glory, for to rise finally to a more happy State. I will not despair, but will believe that our cause being good we...
Tis no small pleasure to me, to hear of the great proficioncy you have made in the French tongue, A Tongue Sweet, and harmonious, a Tongue, useful to Merchants, to Statesmen; to Divines, and especially to Lawyers and Travellers; who by the help of it, may traverse the whole Globe; for in this respect, the French language is pretty much now, what I have heard the Latin formerly was, a universal...
I wrote to you a week ago, and sent my Letter part of the way, but like a bad penny it returnd, to me again. This I write in hopes that it will reach you this week by Sister. Your Letter I received and it gave me both pleasure and pain, it rejoiced my heart to hear from you, and it pained me to hear how Ill Mr. Cranch had been, and how low he still was. Many are the afflictions of the...
If I was sure your absence to day was occasioned, by what it generally is, either to wait upon Company, or promote some good work, I freely confess my Mind would be much more at ease than at present it is. Yet this uneasiness does not arise from any apprehension of Slight or neglect, but a fear least you are indisposed, for that you said should be your only hindrance. Humanity obliges us to be...
I should not have been unmindful of you, even tho you had not call’d upon me to exert myself. I should be the most ungrateful of Mortals, if I did not always with Gratitude remember so kind a Benefactor, as you have been to me both in Sickness, and in Health. How often has your kind hand supported me when I was more helpless than an Infant. How often have you revived me by your Vital Heat? And...
I have just returnd from Weymouth, where I have been for a week past. It seems lonesome here, for My Good Man is at Boston; after haveing been in a large family, for a week, to come and set down alone is very solitary; tho we have seven in our family, yet four of them being domestick when my partner is absent and my Babe a sleep, I am still left alone. It gives one a pleasing Sensation my Dear...
In the last Letter which Mr. Adams had the honour to receive from you, you express a Desire to become acquainted with our American Ladies. To them Mrs. Macaulay is sufficiently distinguished by her superior abilities, and altho she who is now ventureing to address her cannot lay claim to eaquil accomplishments with the Lady before introduced, yet she flatters herself she is no ways deficient...
The great distance between us, makes the time appear very long to me. It seems already a month since you left me. The great anxiety I feel for my Country, for you and for our family renders the day tedious, and the night unpleasent. The Rocks and quick Sands appear upon every Side. What course you can or will take is all wrapt in the Bosom of futurity. Uncertainty and expectation leave the...
Mr. Etter was so good as to come this morning and inform me that his Sons would go to Salem tomorrow. By them I gladly embrace this Opportunity of inquiring after the welfare of you and your family. It has been a very long time since I heard any thing from you; the roads have been so block’d up with Snow here; that I assure you I have not been to Weymouth since mother came from Salem. They...
I Congratulate you upon the fine weather we have had since your absence; if it has been as favourable to you, as it has been here, you will long Ere this reaches you be safely arrived in Carolina. When you left us, you did not tell me, nor did I know till a few days agone, that you designd a visit to our (cruel) Mother Country, shall I say. I highly approve your design. Now is the best Season...
I write you, not from the Noisy Buisy Town, but from my humble Cottage in Braintree, where I arrived last Saturday and here again am to take up my abode. “Where Contemplation p l umes her rufled Wings And the free Soul look’s down to pitty Kings.” Suffer me to snatch you a few moments from all the Hurry and tumult of London and in immagination place you by me that I may ask you ten thousand...
Since I saw you last, I have Wrote to my Uncle at Anapolis, Acquainting Him of my Sisters contending for the Land you Attach’d. He has Since Wrote to them Touching the Matter, and they are Agree’d to give the Land up on conditions they can keep it this Year, as they are prepareing for a Crop and has Sew’d some considerable Quantity of Wheat, and I immagine it will make no Odds with you, as it...
Letter not found: from Daniel Jenifer Adams, 3 Oct. 1772. GW wrote in his account with Daniel Jenifer Adams (printed as note 2 in GW to Robert McMickan, February 1773 ): “In a Letter dated Kingston Jamaica Octr 3d 1772 he [Adams] accts for.”
Yours of the 8th Instat, came safe to hand, wherein you mention, you have come to the resolution of taking upon your Self the payment of my Father’s debts, provided I will Suffer a Condemnation of the Attach’d Effects—join my Sisters in Conveying the Lands to you—& Surrender possession of the Negroe &ca. To all this I and my Sisters will comply with, but Sir I think it will be very Necessary...
In the Name of God Amen. The Eighth day of January in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven hundred and Sixty, and in the thirty third year of his Majestys Reign King George the Second &c. I John Adams of Braintree in the County of Suffolk in the Province of the Massachusetts Bay in New England Gentleman, being in Health of Body and of Perfect mind and Memory thanks be given to God therefor....
601772. Novr. 21. (Adams Papers)
Next Tuesday I shall remove my Family to Boston, after residing in Braintree about 19 Months. I have recovered a Degree of Health by this Excursion into the Country, tho I am an infirm Man yet. I hope I have profited by Retirement and Reflection!—and learned in what manner to live in Boston! How long I shall be able to stay in the City, I know not; if my Health should again decline, I must...
I received your obliging Letter at New York, and it was peculiarly acceptable to me and my Companions, and of great Use to Us among our Friends at New York. We all intreat the Continuance of your Favours, you can have no Idea of the Pleasure We take, in the Letters of our Friends and especially in yours because the Contents of it were very usefully particular and interesting. The Generals...
62Wednesday. May 22. 1771. (Adams Papers)
At Plymouth. Put up at Wetheralls, near the County House—lodged with Mr. Angier, where we had a Chamber wholly to ourselves—very still and retired—very serene and happy. Mrs. Howland and her Family, I hear are very much grieved, and hurt, and concerned about my passing by their House. But my Health is my Excuse of all my Removals. I am not strong enough to bear the Smoke and dirt, and Noise,...
63[December 1773] (Adams Papers)
Last Night 3 Cargoes of Bohea Tea were emptied into the Sea. This Morning a Man of War sails. This is the most magnificent Movement of all. There is a Dignity, a Majesty, a Sublimity, in this last Effort of the Patriots, that I greatly admire. The People should never rise, without doing something to be remembered—something notable And striking. This Destruction of the Tea is so bold, so...
Gridley. Marriage is of the Law of Nations. Justinian extends it, even to the Brutes. The Court adjudgd at Worcester that a Married Woman could not call herself Spinster. Writ not abated. Kent. I shall not enter into the Right of some Men to enslave others. This Right in some Places seems established. Not indeed a Right to Life, tho this is assumed in West Indies to the shame of human Nature....
651771. Saturday June 1st. (Adams Papers)
Spent the Day at Worcester in Riding about with Mr. Putnam to see his Farm. He does what he pleases with Meadows and Rivers of Water. He carries round the Streams wherever he pleases. Took one Ride up to Baggachoag Hill, one Way, and another up the Lane by Doolittles shop, and I found that great Alterations have been made, and many Improvements, in 13 Years, for it is so long since I was in...
66November 5th. 1762. (Adams Papers)
The Cause of Jeffries Town Treasurer of Boston and Sewal and Edwards and several others being suits for the Penalties arising by the Law of the Province for building and covering those Building s not with slate nor Tile but with shingles. Mr. Gridley made a Motion that those Actions should be dismissed because the Judges were all Interested in the Event of them. Two of the Judges vizt. Wells...
67[March 1774] (Adams Papers)
Last evening at Wheelwrights, with Cushing, Pemberton and Swift. Lt. Govr. Oliver, senseless, and dying, the Governor sent for and Olivers Sons. Fluker Flucker has laid in, to be Lieutenant Governor, and has perswaded Hutchinson to write in his favour. This will make a difficulty. C hief J ustice Oliver, and Fluker will interfere. Much said of the Impeachment vs. the C.J.—and upon the Question...
681774. Septr. 12. Monday. (Adams Papers)
Attended my Duty on the Committee, untill one O Clock, and then went with my Colleagues and Messrs. Thompson and Mifflin to the Falls of Schuylkill, and viewed the Museum at Fort St. Davids, a great Collection of Curiosities. Returned and dined with Mr. Dickinson at his Seat at Fair Hill, with his Lady, Mrs. Thompson, Miss Norris and Miss Harrison. Mr. Dickinson has a fine Seat, a beautyfull...
691774 Tuesday. Octr. 4. (Adams Papers)
Dined with Mr. Alexander Wilcox, with all the Delegates from N. York, and several other Gentlemen.—This Evening General Lee came to my Lodgings and shewed me an Address from the C ongress to the People of Canada which he had. It was not, however, until 21 Oct. that Congress resolved to prepare an address to the people of Quebec, which was brought in by a committee (on which JA did not serve)...
7026 Thurdsday. (Adams Papers)
Fair cold morning. An extream cold Day.