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I received your Letter of July 12. I am inclined to think your last determination will prove a judicious one. I most sincerely hope it will. The President expects to leave this city next week. we shall go Northward for a Month or two. I could have wisht that my Health would have permitted me, to have visited the new city at this season; but the Heat is so great that I dare not make the...
The weather is Hot as we can bear the whole city is like a Bake House. we have a House with large and airy Rooms, or I could not sustain it I do bear it surprizingly well however, tho I long for a sea Breaze. I hope to leave here on monday and get on to Bristol 18 miles the first night. I shall want Several things put in order at home for our reception when I once get on my journey. I shall...
Three or four days after the date of my last Letter, which was from Maassluys, and while I was yet wind bound there, M r: Murray, informed me that by private Letters from a friend he understood that my destination was changed from Lisbon to Berlin. On the 9 th: inst t: I sailed from Maassluys, and arrived here at the Adelphi, on the 12 th: Soon after, M r: King delivered to me your Letter of...
The journey which I made to Paris, towards the last of April was performed so hastily, that it was out of my power to give you any satisfactory account of it from thence, and since my return, preparation for departure from Holland has engrossed most of my leisure hours, so that I have only found time to give an imperfect sketch to my Father of the most material occurrences of that tour. The...
we have made every thing as ready for your reception as we can. but alass I fear we Shall not see you. I think it will not be possible under the present State of affairs for the President to leave with prudence the Seat of Goverment for So long a journey but I hope you will leave the city If you do not come you will be Sav’d the melancholy prospect of your ruin’d Barley field & distroy’d...
I have now the happiness of presenting to you another daughter, worthy as I fully believe of adding one to the number of those who already endear that relation to you.— The day before yesterday united us for life. My recommendation of her to your kindness and affection I know will be unnecessary. My sentiment of her merit, will not at this moment especially boast its impartiality , but if...
We leave this place this morning & hope to reach Home on fryday of the next week. I have written to mr smith to procure sundry articles for me in Boston which will require a Team to bring them to Quincy, & bags for oats will you be so good as to consult with mr Porter, and if mr Belcher can go to Town for them So as to get them up before we arrive I should be very glad. will you be so kind as...
We are thus far on our Way to N England if no accident happens to prevent us. I hope on thursday of next week to sleep at williams at Malbourough, and to dine at Watertown on fryday. We escaped from N york with less parade than was intended, tho we were not less sensible to the politeness and civility of the inhabitants who were disposed to do us every honour both civil and Military. the first...
I wrote you a few lines yesterday, jointly with my new partner informing you of our marriage, upon which I would once more invoke your maternal blessing.— At present I write in answer to your very kind Letters of 15. March. 15. and 23. June all of which I have received since my arrival here. Before the receipt of the latter, I was in doubt whether you were at Philadelphia, or at Quincy.— I...
Your kind Letter which assured me of your welfare was a cordial to my heart. It came safe to hand, with its contents by Judge Livermore. The affectionate regard it evinced for me, & mine, might have overwhelmed an heart less accustomed to favours; accustomed , not callous I assure you, for esteem, love, & gratitude so often put in motion, fans the finer feelings, & makes them glow with...
Though I have not hitherto enjoyed the pleasure of a personal acquaintance with you, I have long since learnt to participate in the warm affection which a most amiable and worthy family, to which you belong, bear towards you, and at this time after having formed and solemnized, the tenderest and dearest of all human connections with your beloved sister, Louisa, I am happy in deriving from it...
Upon my arrival at this place, about three weeks since, I received your kind letter of June 8 th: which was the first line, I have had from you these many months, and it needed not that circumstance to render it highly valuable. You do not however mention in it the receipt of several letters, which I have written you, and which I hope have not miscarried in the conveyance. Among the rest, that...
M rs. Cranch informs me that a kind letter arrived from you at Washington since my arrival here, requesting me to reside at your house while I remained in Philad a. — I need not repeat how much I am obliged by all your goodness & attention. The second day after my arrival here I met M r. Briesler, who mentioned to me your kind request & the orders he had received; & inforced the invitation...
I arrived here this day week, but have been so constantly occupied in seeing company that I have not had time to write a single Line. I received your Letter which I suppose had been on to Philadelphia, on fryday last, in the full Faith that mr Peabody & you would comply with our request. I took the Children, and brought them with me. John is somewhat indisposed with a return of his Ague— I...
With pleasure we are informed in the public prints of your safe return from the seat of government. The present critical state of the affairs of our country, has undoubtedly produced pressing anxieties in your mind, of which we have all in some measure been partakers. But the public mind appears to be relieved and satisfied, with the cool, deliberate, and spirited measures recommended in your...
After your having been three months in the City of Philadelphia at this season of the year I think our good Friend the President and you must want some relaxation, and the sea air for a few weeks will be gratefull to you. as we are agreeably situated near the river I dont feel the want of it. where ever you are I wish health and happyness to attend, and hope you will return perfectly recovered...
I have at length made up my mind to accompany my brother and his lady to Berlin. In justification of this resolution I shall only observe, that it was formed after full and mature consideration, in which both sides of the question, to go or not to go, were deliberately examined, but I may also add, that compliance with the earnest desires of my brother, had a greater share in producing this...
I this Day Received your kind Letter and we are all Happy to hear of your Safe arivall at Quincy we are all in the Dumps the yellow fever has again found its way in to this City and threatens Great mortality the hoal City is in Confusion and mooving out of town it first Broke out in Spruce and Pen Street and thair Seems to be Confined at Present But how fare it will go God only knows if it...
M r: Fitch Hall being about to embark for New York I have entrusted to his care a trifling present, which I beg you to accept from me. I intended to have sent you a profile of myself by M rs: Johnson, but was prevented by the suddenness of her departure, which took place a week sooner than it had been previously fixed. The whole family left this place yesterday morning with the intention of...
We reached Graves end about 11 OClock on Monday & proceeded immediatly on Shipboard. the Wind being fair we Saild in about Two Hours afterwards & rundown to the Hope, we remained their that Night & got under weigh the next Day & reached Bugsbeys Hole, where we remained until to Day 1 O Clock during which time we experined very heavy Gales of Wind, which created both alarm & much Sickness. we...
altho an unsolicited Corespondent my heart assure’s, me these few Lines, will find A Generous Asylum, in your Breast, you will doubtless be surpris’d at the date of this, but driven by adverse Winds, & what is still Worse, Adverse Fortune, we are Obliged to take refuge in one of the Islands, of the Orkney’s, the sport of Boreos for these last ten days, we Blest the Providence, which Secure’d...
I last Evening received your Letter of the 19 & 20 th Instant. I am most sincerely grieved for the melancholy situation of our Nephew, and the more so as it is not in my power to render him any personal assistance. Since my return from Haverhill I have thought it necessary to return the civilities received, which has obliged me to entertain weekly several sets of company and that with a Family...
I acknowledg myself indebted to you for two kind Letters, both of which found me in circumstances of distress; the first which came to me before I went to Philadelphia, I fully intended to have replied to at the Time, but the many cares and avocations which at that time occupied my mind, preparitory to my going, and the peculiar melancholy circumstance of the Death of my Mother and Neice...
Since I came to this Country, two of your kind letters have reached me; one dated in June & the other in July; the latter came by Gen l: Marshall, but by some accident was not forwarded at the same time with your letter to my brother of the same date. It has only this day come to hand. Contrary to your expectation, as well as my own, your letters find me still in Europe, and about to embark in...
Since my last my time has been cheifly occupied, in attending to those services, which were due to our late worthy Nephew— Though we had been in daily expectation of his dissolution, & every breath he drew seemed as if I heard a voice, saying “Sister Spirit come away” yet it was a sudden stroke at the close— As he called the watcher who set by him, Aunt, I suppose he took her for me ; & I was...
It is but a few days since I received your kind letter of 14. July, brought to Holland by Gen l: Marshall, and forwarded to me here. The pamphlets also which you have been kind enough to send me have come to hand. I value them much not only for the advantage of perusing them, but because I am endeavouring to preserve a collection of such publications. My state of continual motion is indeed...
I arrived here this Evening with your Mother and Cozen all in good health, and was Sorry to hear that you went from hence on Monday unwell. I hope you are better. If I go into Town in Ceremony I Should be glad of your Company with me in my Carriage. My Letters will, Some of them be directed to your Care, I Shall be glad to receive them as soon as possible. Can you Send them out by the Stage to...
I received your obliging letter dated in Margate Roads just before your departure. I had indeed long observed your distress and that of your family. I was not particularly acquainted with its causes, nor was it a subject upon which I thought it proper or necessary to enquire You expected that the step upon which you determined would expose you to censure; but as you observe you thought it the...
we arrived here on twesday Evening on the 11 th , after a pleasent journey in which we met with but few obstructions the Weather on one Day prevented our travelling, and we tarried on sunday at Hartford, and on Monday morning were escorted out of Town by a Troop of light Horse, and the citizens in carriages and on Horse back as far as Weathersfield. we proceed then for New Haven about 40 miles...
I thank you for your Letter from worcester since that I have heard by the papers you have arriv’d in new-york. I hope Safe. you must have had bad weather some part of the way if Such as we had reach’d you. last Sunday evening we had a terrible Tempest of thunder Lightning & wind & rain the Lightning struck the house of cap n. J o. Baxter & every person in it reciev’d a Shock there were many...
I was in hopes to have seen you, and had some more conversation with you upon the subject of finishing the Room in the out House. I experienced so many inconveniencies from a mixture of Families Whilst I was at Home, that I should not wish to try it again, for if mr & mrs Porter had not been of a very accommodating disposition we should have met with more trouble than I did. I told mr Porter...
As you was absent when I left home I was unable to pay you for some articles which you had purchased for me, as well as some which mrs smith had procured for me. if you will be so good as to forward me the amount, I will transmit it to you— When I pay’d mr Fothingham for the Carriage, there were the quarter Lights and some other matters which made the carriage amount to more than our first...
I send you the Letters— I could not keep my hands off of Nabby’s. I beg her Pardon. They write me flattering Accounts from Phil a. M r Anthony writes most confidently. No danger. No fever—alls well.— When Brisler goes he should throw Lime into the Cellar Vault &c. I think We ought to have been together to day. But tomorrow will do. I am glad Malcom came out. We must prepare to go to Phil a....
The Newspapers had informed Us of your Marriage, but the first Evidence of it from yourself, was in your Letter to your Mother of the 29. July.— I congratulate you and your Lady on this Event, which I hope will be for your mutual Happiness and the Comfort of all the Friends of both Parties, for a long Course of years, dedicated to the Public— And may the Blessing of God Almighty be bestowed on...
I have rec d your charming narration of your Tour to Paris, both to me and your mother, and am happy to find you were so civilly treated and so well pleased. I shall never forget the kindness of my Friend Arnoux to myself or to you. I congratulate you, on your new Acquisition of a Sister. I Suppose this match grew out of a Spark that was kindled at Nantes in 1779 when your Brother was with me...
I have received but one Letter from you Since I left Quincy now near a Month; I have been here three weeks, except 3 days which I past at my sons in N york— next Monday I leave here for Philadelphia where it is thought we may now go with safety— I was in hopes to have taken Mrs smith with me, but her situation is difficult not having received any advise what to do, and She is loth to go for...
I last monday receiv’d your Letter of the 22 d of october it was a long time coming. I wrote to you as soon as I thought you had arriv’d at your Daughters you have receiv’d a Letter from me & sister Peabody too I hope. I shall write, always about mrs Smiths little Boys when I can get any news from them. Will m Shaw did not go home this vacation but stay’d at cambridge to study I have not heard...
Since my residence at this place, now a Month, occasiond by the prevalence of the yellow fever in Philadelphia, I have had the pleasure to receive two Letters from you; one from the Hague june 26 th , the other from London july 29 th . the joint Letter you mention as having written, is not yet come to Hand. The Newspapers before I left Quincy, which was on the 2d of the last Month, had informd...
It was only Yesterday that I received your No. 44 of 22. July though I had rec d N o. 45 a few days before. When I nominated you to Berlin, your Mother had not rec d the Letter in which you mentioned your aversion to holding an office under my nomination. If I had known you had formed Such a resolution I should not have made any Alteration in your destination till I had written you on the...
I received Yours of Octob r. 14 h. and have attended to the several Matters mentiond therein. The Wall at the Foot of Pens Hill is nearly compleated, one or two Days Work will finish it as far as you directed the Workmen to proceed— there will then be Stones sufficient to rebuild the Wall between you & Hardwick and a large Number besides for any other Purpose it therefore appears to me, that...
I received a few days since with much pleasure your letter jointly with my new Sisters for which be pleased to accept my thanks. the account of your Marriage reached me some time before your letter, and I should have written congratulating you upon an Event which a knowledge of the Ladys merits induces me to hope may be fraught with happiness had I not been a little piqued that you had never...
Your Letters have become Such a model of elegant composition, that I cannot but think you must discover So many dificencies in my untoutord stile, that I feel a little anxious in Exposing it to your Eye. your desire however to obtain intelligence from your Native Land, and from the Friends, and Relatives you have Left there, will induce you to pass over with a less scrutinizing Eye the...
I yesterday about 11 oclock went into the Presidents Room to see if John had returnd from the post office. my good Gentleman was soberly Standing at the fire with your Letter open and very gravely reading it. I scolded and very soon carried it of. I thank you for all your communications. the P. says one of sister Cranchs Letters is worth half a dozen others. she allways tells us so much about...
After an absence of near four Months I returned, to this City the last week. I am disposed to renew my correspondence with you, if you can find leisure to attend it. The fraternal regard and affection which for many years subsisted between you and my sons is not lessned by time, or diminished by absence, but I trust has grown ripened, and matured by age, and like the Affection of your parents...
I wrote you from East Chester and inclosed you 90 dollors to pay a Note in mr Frothinghams hands. I have not received a line in acknowledgment of the letter, which makes me a little anxious for its fate. you was so good as to Say you would send me Some salt fish. I should like a couple of kental to treat our good Massachusetts Friends. I will thank you to send it by one of the first vessels,...
On 16 November 1797 the Philadelphia Aurora General Advertiser printed the following squib: “His serene highness of Braintree made an anti-climax on his journey from his dukedom. Boston made the cap of the climax, Philadelphia its tail. On another occasion it would be safer and wiser to make no further attempts at forcing respect; for it sits aukwardly upon men, that from respect it...
I have received your favour of the 3 d and am much obliged to you for it and equally pleased with its Contents. I agree with you in opinion that it will be well to rebuild the Wall against Hardwick: to renew the Leases as soon as possible with French and Burrill, if they choose to do so, and to plough and cart manure as you propose. I am very glad the Meadow is ploughed. This is a great Point...
That you have reciev’d but one Letter from me my dear Sister is not because I have not written I cannot think where they are detain’d— they were address’d to the President & to the care of charles Adams Counsellor at Law—as the President directed. I have sent three. I have not written So often as I would have done if I had not been much taken up with Company & Family cares.— I have been oblg’d...
I received your obliging favour of Nov br 8 th the day after I last wrote you. I inclose the amount of your account with many thanks for your kindness— The Betsy is arrived with the fish, and if my cook can be taught to dress it, some of our Nothern Friends shall Toast your Health. The state of N Jersey as you observe, most certainly manifested a very marked respect and approbation of the...
I am not only highly gratified, but extremely grateful for your kind communication of 15 th. inst t , with it’s important inclosures.— The fraternal and affectionate friendship, which has so long existed between your sons and myself, has indeed been among the greatest Consolations of my life—and the consciousness that it still continues, brightens many of my passing days.— Having been so long...