You
have
selected

  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 13,608 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have received from the hand of one of your Senators in Congress Mr Bingham your public and explicit declaration of your Sentiments and Resolutions, at this important Crisis, in an excellent Address. Although it ought not to be Supposed that young Gentlemen of your Standing should be deeply versed in political disquisitions, because your time has been Spent in the Pursuit of the Elements of...
I received yesterday your letter and package by Capt. White, and have received the account of the last resolution of the house to disband the army. I think the jacobins have now reason to exult, at out-manœuvering the federalists, as it appears they do upon every occasion. The federalists deserve every thing that will happen to them for their apathy. The next thing I expect to hear is that...
There is a great deal of pain: taken to make mischief between you & Mr & Mrs Porter many wish for his birth but I am confident no one who has offer’d would take better care of your things in the house or to whom you could trust them with equal Satefy James Howard is very busy & very abusive, told mr cranch that he heard mr Porter was going, & that it was time he should— he knew his tricks: you...
Your kind Letter which assured me of your welfare was a cordial to my heart. It came safe to hand, with its contents by Judge Livermore. The affectionate regard it evinced for me, & mine, might have overwhelmed an heart less accustomed to favours; accustomed , not callous I assure you, for esteem, love, & gratitude so often put in motion, fans the finer feelings, & makes them glow with...
I rec d last night your Letter of the 11 th. Your Girls and M r shipley arrived in good health and Spirits. I shall Send the Charriot this morning to meet you. It would be a great pleasure to me to go in it, but I am so engaged in indispensable business that I know not how to leave it and another thing of some importance is your Son may take a seat with you & Suzan in the Charriot and that...
I had a mantua makaker & a Tailor last week which keept me so fully imploy’d that I had not time to write I receiv’d your kind Letter by the Post a thursday & rejoice that you have got into such good order so soon. I do not rise quite so early as you but I should if I could get all my folks to Bed in season you do well to devote so much of the day to riding I hope the difficulty the bad roads...
I am doom’d my dear Sister to be the messenger of death to you. I believe for five weeks past my Letters have convey’d you an account of the death of Some Freind or acquaintence & almost all of them Suddenly taken away the death of Sucky warner whos remains I yesterday Saw depositted by the Side of our dear Parents & much belov’d aunt. there to remain till the last trumpet Shall bid them...
It was with the greatest concern I heard of your late illness, since which time I have felt very sollicitous to hear of your recovery, & hoped before this to have had that gratification— I therefore was greatly disappointed, when M r M c Henry told me a day or two since, that you were still indisposed.— this information so contrary to my wishes is the cause of my troubling you with this letter...
Last night for the first time I slept in our new House.— But what a Scene! The Furniture belonging to the Publick is in the most deplorable Condition— There is not a Chair fit to sit in. The Beds and Bedding are in a woeful Pickle. This House has been a scene of the most scandalous Drunkenness and Disorder among the servants, that ever I heard of. I would not have one of them for any...
I take the liberty of addressing a few lines to you, knowing from the Friendship with which you have honord myself, and Family; that it will not be thought an intrusion by you, and I take leave Madam to assure you that it ever makes me happy to hear of your health, and of the welfare of yourself, and Family, and that this Circle in George street are much intrested at this time, for M r: Adams’...
I received not untill last Evening your kind favour of Feb y: 10. which however is the latest date that I have from you, and this circumstance is of itself sufficient to give me great concern respecting the state of your health— The Boston Newspapers in April, mention likewise that you were again ill; but I have some comfort in hearing by a letter from D r: Welsh to his son, that you were...
I am unable to find language to express my Gratitude and thankfullness to you—for your maternal Care of the Dear little orphan whose life we owe to your uncommon resolution and perseverance— I think if you had not taken care of it, it would have Dyed a more dreadfull death and a more melancholy death than if it been taken away with the smallpox or yellowfever— it is said them that will give a...
I feel too sensibly the obligations you have laid me under by the letters you had the goodness to write on the 3 d & 4 th. — they deserve a better return than it is possible for me to make; while I can only offer the effusions of a grateful heart I see too plainly that those alone wou’d not be acceptable— you require a Serious engagement on my part which I am forbidden to make by motives that...
Your’s of the 6 th Instant I received yesterday together with the Extracts from Bache’s Paper they have not yet found their way in to the Chronicle ’tho it may be expected. with respect to the Charge against the President of Insinserity in the Interval between his Address to Congress and his Nomination I can say that I took notice of the same here two Days only before the Nomination was known...
I received your letter of Dec 9 th , with all that pleasure and satisfaction, which, the news of your better health, could not but excite— I declare I wish you would have, Aunt, a wedding every night in the week, for I plainly see that it gives you better spirits and consequently better health, than all the medicine in the world. I have not seen the president so happy this some time, as he was...
I have just returned from spending an agreeable hour with your best Friend. In the Course of our Conversation, he informed me that you had lately in Addition to former complaints, been afflicted with an intermitting fever of a tertian type. This state of fever in our Climate of late years is often accompanied with inflammatory Symptoms, and instead of yielding to its usual remedy the Bark, is...
To hear of your health and happiness my dear Madam is always pleasing to me when ever you can spare time from the many ingagements I know you have I shall esteem it a favour. I am flattered from the pleasing account you give of my Daughter White she was always a good Child and I think she will do all she can to render the Family she is in happy Mr s Bartlett is a fine Woman. Mr Dalton and I...
I am almost dead with a horrid cold and fear that before I shall half finish this letter I shall drown it with water, from my eyes. I wish I felt well and in good spirits enough to give you an account of the presidents ball— it was brilliant indeed, and the ladies were drest and looked almost too beautiful. The president enjoyed himself much better, than he would have done, had not Cousen...
I have rec d yours of 24 th and thank you for your relation of our little domestic affairs at Quincy. Brisler did not arrive last night as you callculated. His Children may detain him longer than you expected.— some of the public Offices are about removing to Phyladelphia this Week. I can Send James with my Horses and Charriot to meet you at Hoebucken Ferry or Elizabeth Town or any other Place...
I have yours of 26 by Brisler and that of the 28 th. this Morning. Thomas is in Phyladelphia and Brisler with his Family are going off this morning in the Stage. He will write me this Evening or tomorrow.— I expect to hear from you when and where you intend to Set out, and where you intend to be.— The offices of Treasury & State are gone to Phyladelphia. War, Navy & Law remain here, for...
I take my pen to make a Recuest to you in Behalf of Elisha adams as you are in high Surcomestances I was affraid to Right Butt have Ben [Prevld?] with to Dear madam the Case is this Elisha adams has Bought a Plase which he agred to give 1600 hundrede Dollers and has Paid 800 Dollers Try Be So kind as to Lend him 4 or 5 hundrede Dollers tis Not in my Power to Let him have the money I Shuld be...
I wrote to you the 14 th. Ins t. acknowledging the Receipt of Yours of Feb y. 21. & the 6 th. of this Month. I have conferred with M r. Porter and his Wife relative to their Continuance on the Farm for 7 Months— I cannot bring M r. Porter to a less Sum than 175 Doll rs. for that Term, which is 25 Dollars more than you mentiond, altho it appears to me that it would upon the whole be better to...
Since the last Letter I rec d from you dated April 12 th poor Sukey compleated the Journey of Life and is gone to the World of Spirits through the whole of her Sickness, few have exhibited a greater Degree of Firmness, Patience & Submission to the divine Will, She has left us the consoling Hope of her enjoying a blessed Immortality— M rs. Tufts by her long attendance upon her seems to be much...
Notwithstanding my arms are so stiff, that I can scarcely move them, occasioned by cutting venson for twenty eight very hungry men, yet I must write a few lines to my aunt, before I sleep. We were made very happy this morning by the receipt of your letter of the tenth of Dec to the president. You do not say a single word, whether you have receiveed the newspapers, which I have sent you...
I write now because I know how it feels to be disappointed not because I have any thing to communicate of importance. I receiv’d your kind Letter of the 13 th of this month what related to my dear Son has given me great pain tis no more than I have fear’d. but his Father Says if he can get over these difficulties he will be as cunning as the ——— he does not speak wicked words you know. my fear...
Receiv’d of M rs Adams one hundred dollars in Payment for a Portrait painted by me RC ( Adams Papers ). For Stuart’s portrait of AA , see Descriptive List of Illustrations, No. 6, above.
The latest letters I have had the pleasure of receiving from you are of January 5. and Feb y: 8. But M r: Paleske has arrived at London on his way hither, and I expect to see him here in the course of a few days— He informs me that he has letters for me from you. A longer time has elapsed since I wrote you last than I can apologize for with propriety; it is possible that at some future day I...
I have been so overwhelmed with Business at the Close of the session of Congress and Since, that I have not been able to write you for several Days. M r Grove desired me to tell you that M r William Smith your Nephew is married to a very amiable young Lady the Daughter of a rich Father. What he means by a rich Father I dont know.— I congratulate you & Louisa on this Event. I cannot Say whether...
I this Day Received your kind Letter and we are all Happy to hear of your Safe arivall at Quincy we are all in the Dumps the yellow fever has again found its way in to this City and threatens Great mortality the hoal City is in Confusion and mooving out of town it first Broke out in Spruce and Pen Street and thair Seems to be Confined at Present But how fare it will go God only knows if it...
Your favor of the 28 th inst I this morning had the pleasure to receive and for which my best thanks are due you. With this you will receive a letter from Mr T. Adams received last evening— I think the probability is that he will be with us this Afternoon. The Chief Justice and Govenor Davie have both left this place for New port where Captain Barrey is waiting to receive them and to carry...
You will See by the Proclamation in the Public Papers that I have been obliged to convene Congress on the 15 th of May, and as it is probable they will Sitt till the Middle of July, this measure must make an entire change in all our Arrangements There are so many Things to do in furnishing the House in which I want your Advice, and on so many other Accounts it is improper We should live in a...
I acknowledge with Pleasure your Letter of the 7 th Ins t: thinking it uncertain whether you may not have left Philadelphia before this reaches that City I shall desire the President to open it provided you should have entered on your Journey northward unaccompanied by him I am induced to do this least the Appointments should be made out before I could make known my Wishes to him they are to...
Your sisterly kindness to me my dear Madam induces me to believe that to hear of our welfare will not be uninteresting to you. We were blessed with fine weather every day until the last from Newhaven here when the wind at NE produced a violent snow storm that night (the 28 of Feb y ) & the next day, when we considered ourselves very fortunate beings in arriving here before it took place. The...
O how happy should I be, were I to sit down to write you of my dear sisters better health, but alas I cannot. She fails every day & has now grown so weak that she is not able to wride out or even to come below stairs. She still keeps her usual flow of spirits, & sits “like patience on a monument, smiling” even tho in the arms of death. How miserable should I be, my aunt, in seeing my dear...
I received Your Favour of Octob r. 17. last, and have agreably to your Request consulted Deac n Pierce, respecting an Addition to your Dwelling House, He is of opinion that if an Addition be made in Front, (which He supposes to be practicable) it will be necessary to take the east Chimney down; the Floors below & in the Chambers must be taken up as well as some other Parts of the Rooms— upon...
Though the kind remembrance I have of my Sister is imprinted upon my heart, as with a point of a diamond, & can never be erased while vital spirits remain, yet I know not when I have written to her.— The cares & anxieties, the hopes, & the fears, that I should do too much, or not enough for my poor Betsy, I did not wish to trouble you with, or to tell you that my mind has been so agitated...
I have not written to you, since receiving your very kind Letter of 3 d: March. though I received it almost a month ago. I have determined finally to go by the way of England; you will readily conceive that this circumstance together with the necessary attention to the preparations for my departure from this Country, and since the arrival of M r: Murray, the arrangements for introducing him to...
Not a single letter have we received from you since Monday. Uncle sighs and says, I wish Aunt would write oftener and I sigh and say, Ah! if she knew half the happiness her letters gave to you us, I am sure she would write every day in the week. Congress debates have been warm and interesting for two days past on Mr. Griswolds motion respecting punishing interferences in the government &c. but...
I this day receiv’d your kind Letter from Springfield. I Set you down in Brookfield in my mind that day however I think you did right to go on as fast as you could the President must want both you & mr Brisler & could I think you would have any rest after you arriv’d I should feel better about you. but I do hope you will not think of Staying thro the hot months your Life is of too much...
Some lover of your nephews happiness, last thursday added something to the fragment of life, by placing in my hands your agreeable favor of March 20 th. The pamphlet sent me, I give you my sincere thanks. Is not Mr. Pickering the author. As soon as I read it, I thought I could see in it his simple style and forcible reasoning. I had read both Scipio and Munroes view, before I received your...
I cannot Say when I shall be able to sett out. But I shall loose no time here. When the Public Business is in such a state that I can leave it, I shall go, be the Roads as they may.— I expect bad travelling all the Way. Truxton has indeed taken the Insurgent. But We have a silly Insurgence in Northampton County in this state, which will detain me, I suppose, some days This state is not a moral...
It is a long time since I have written to you— My mind has been so agitated that I was not fit to write—or in other words, when I sat for a moment, & attempted to write my paper became so blotted, that I was asshamed to send it— Now do not attempt to reason; for I should feel so conscious that its dictates ought to be obeyed, & so little able to comply, that this would prove another source of...
After your having been three months in the City of Philadelphia at this season of the year I think our good Friend the President and you must want some relaxation, and the sea air for a few weeks will be gratefull to you. as we are agreeably situated near the river I dont feel the want of it. where ever you are I wish health and happyness to attend, and hope you will return perfectly recovered...
I have the Pleasure of hearing of your Arrival at East Chester and in Health. Since you left Quincy, We have scarcely had a Storm, except that which occur’d on your Journey. The Weather has proved favourable for Farming Business and for finishing the Cellar, which will probably be compleated this Week as far as was intended, th’o not in all its Parts as was directed by Brizler, the Part next...
Monday Morning, the most agreable in the Week because it brings me Letters from you, has not failed me to day. I have yours of 23 and 25 March. The Correspondence with Plymouth amused me much— The Answer is Superiour to the Letter both in Delicacy, and keenness.— You might have told her, if Chance decides in Elections, it is no better than Descent. But she knows not what she wants. The Letter...
I too have taken my pen with the rising Sun. I have been so disturb’d with the account of the allarming riot before your Door on the fast day evening that I have not had a moments quiet sleep this night. I had no Idea the faction would have tried their Strength So oppenly I suppos’d the Letters which had been thrown into your house were mear threats. but I hope they have but Staid their time—...
The recipt of your affectionate and friendly letter my dear Madam Claims at once my gratitude and love.— how good is that heart that feels for others woes Such is yours,—and may Heaven bless you with health and long life, and may you still Continue to fill every Station of Life that Providence shall Call you to with that dignity humanity and sensibility which has ever been your Characteristick...
I am sorry that I did not know the President’s wishes, before the Receit of your Letter, to be a Purchaser of Thompson’s Island. One half of it only is owned by me, the other half by m r & m rs. Oliver of Salem. I had determined to part with my half; and two Persons have Appeared to make an Agreement for it. my Price is two thousand dollars for my part. One of the two persons is to give me an...
In my last I enclosed a rough Plan of the proposed Addition to the Wood House, that Plan will exhibit to You an Idea of the lower Room; since then I have found, that it will not be much more expensive, to take the Roof off from the Wood house & Library and erect a new one over them, than to proceed in the Way that was projected. I have accordingly orderd it to be framd in this Way; upon this...
As the extract which you marked in y r Son’s letter was too long for one paper I divided it & gave one half to Benj n & the other half to John Russell, the latter part appears in the Commercial Gazette of this day, the former I hope will come out on Saturday. I have read Robisons Conspiracy with astonishment, it contains the seeds of all the mischiefs which we have been tormented with for...