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I have received from the hand of one of your Senators in Congress Mr Bingham your public and explicit declaration of your Sentiments and Resolutions, at this important Crisis, in an excellent Address. Although it ought not to be Supposed that young Gentlemen of your Standing should be deeply versed in political disquisitions, because your time has been Spent in the Pursuit of the Elements of...
Your kind Letter which assured me of your welfare was a cordial to my heart. It came safe to hand, with its contents by Judge Livermore. The affectionate regard it evinced for me, & mine, might have overwhelmed an heart less accustomed to favours; accustomed , not callous I assure you, for esteem, love, & gratitude so often put in motion, fans the finer feelings, & makes them glow with...
I had a mantua makaker & a Tailor last week which keept me so fully imploy’d that I had not time to write I receiv’d your kind Letter by the Post a thursday & rejoice that you have got into such good order so soon. I do not rise quite so early as you but I should if I could get all my folks to Bed in season you do well to devote so much of the day to riding I hope the difficulty the bad roads...
I am doom’d my dear Sister to be the messenger of death to you. I believe for five weeks past my Letters have convey’d you an account of the death of Some Freind or acquaintence & almost all of them Suddenly taken away the death of Sucky warner whos remains I yesterday Saw depositted by the Side of our dear Parents & much belov’d aunt. there to remain till the last trumpet Shall bid them...
It was with the greatest concern I heard of your late illness, since which time I have felt very sollicitous to hear of your recovery, & hoped before this to have had that gratification— I therefore was greatly disappointed, when M r M c Henry told me a day or two since, that you were still indisposed.— this information so contrary to my wishes is the cause of my troubling you with this letter...
Last night for the first time I slept in our new House.— But what a Scene! The Furniture belonging to the Publick is in the most deplorable Condition— There is not a Chair fit to sit in. The Beds and Bedding are in a woeful Pickle. This House has been a scene of the most scandalous Drunkenness and Disorder among the servants, that ever I heard of. I would not have one of them for any...
I received not untill last Evening your kind favour of Feb Y : 10. which however is the latest date that I have from you, and this circumstance is of itself sufficient to give me great concern respecting the state of your health— The Boston Newspapers in April, mention likewise that you were again ill; but I have some comfort in hearing by a letter from D r : Welsh to his son, that you were...
I am unable to find language to express my Gratitude and thankfullness to you—for your maternal Care of the Dear little orphan whose life we owe to your uncommon resolution and perseverance— I think if you had not taken care of it, it would have Dyed a more dreadfull death and a more melancholy death than if it been taken away with the smallpox or yellowfever— it is said them that will give a...
I feel too sensibly the obligations you have laid me under by the letters you had the goodness to write on the 3 d & 4 th. — they deserve a better return than it is possible for me to make; while I can only offer the effusions of a grateful heart I see too plainly that those alone wou’d not be acceptable— you require a Serious engagement on my part which I am forbidden to make by motives that...
Your’s of the 6 th Instant I received yesterday together with the Extracts from Bache’s Paper they have not yet found their way in to the Chronicle ’tho it may be expected. with respect to the Charge against the President of Insinserity in the Interval between his Address to Congress and his Nomination I can say that I took notice of the same here two Days only before the Nomination was known...
I received your letter of Dec 9 th , with all that pleasure and satisfaction, which, the news of your better health, could not but excite— I declare I wish you would have, Aunt, a wedding every night in the week, for I plainly see that it gives you better spirits and consequently better health, than all the medicine in the world. I have not seen the president so happy this some time, as he was...
I have just returned from spending an agreeable hour with your best Friend. In the Course of our Conversation, he informed me that you had lately in Addition to former complaints, been afflicted with an intermitting fever of a tertian type. This state of fever in our Climate of late years is often accompanied with inflammatory Symptoms, and instead of yielding to its usual remedy the Bark, is...
To hear of your health and happiness my dear Madam is always pleasing to me when ever you can spare time from the many ingagements I know you have I shall esteem it a favour. I am flattered from the pleasing account you give of my Daughter White she was always a good Child and I think she will do all she can to render the Family she is in happy Mr s Bartlett is a fine Woman. Mr Dalton and I...
I am almost dead with a horrid cold and fear that before I shall half finish this letter I shall drown it with water, from my eyes. I wish I felt well and in good spirits enough to give you an account of the presidents ball— it was brilliant indeed, and the ladies were drest and looked almost too beautiful. The president enjoyed himself much better, than he would have done, had not Cousen...
I take my pen to make a Recuest to you in Behalf of Elisha adams as you are in high Surcomestances I was affraid to Right Butt have Ben [Prevld?] with to Dear madam the Case is this Elisha adams has Bought a Plase which he agred to give 1600 hundrede Dollers and has Paid 800 Dollers Try Be So kind as to Lend him 4 or 5 hundrede Dollers tis Not in my Power to Let him have the money I Shuld be...
Since the last Letter I rec d from you dated April 12 th poor Sukey compleated the Journey of Life and is gone to the World of Spirits through the whole of her Sickness, few have exhibited a greater Degree of Firmness, Patience & Submission to the divine Will, She has left us the consoling Hope of her enjoying a blessed Immortality— M rs. Tufts by her long attendance upon her seems to be much...
Notwithstanding my arms are so stiff, that I can scarcely move them, occasioned by cutting venson for twenty eight very hungry men, yet I must write a few lines to my aunt, before I sleep. We were made very happy this morning by the receipt of your letter of the tenth of Dec to the president. You do not say a single word, whether you have receiveed the newspapers, which I have sent you...
I write now because I know how it feels to be disappointed not because I have any thing to communicate of importance. I receiv’d your kind Letter of the 13 th of this month what related to my dear Son has given me great pain tis no more than I have fear’d. but his Father Says if he can get over these difficulties he will be as cunning as the ——— he does not speak wicked words you know. my fear...
I have been so overwhelmed with Business at the Close of the session of Congress and Since, that I have not been able to write you for several Days. M r Grove desired me to tell you that M r William Smith your Nephew is married to a very amiable young Lady the Daughter of a rich Father. What he means by a rich Father I dont know.— I congratulate you & Louisa on this Event. I cannot Say whether...
I this Day Received your kind Letter and we are all Happy to hear of your Safe arivall at Quincy we are all in the Dumps the yellow fever has again found its way in to this City and threatens Great mortality the hoal City is in Confusion and mooving out of town it first Broke out in Spruce and Pen Street and thair Seems to be Confined at Present But how fare it will go God only knows if it...
You will See by the Proclamation in the Public Papers that I have been obliged to convene Congress on the 15 th of May, and as it is probable they will Sitt till the Middle of July, this measure must make an entire change in all our Arrangements There are so many Things to do in furnishing the House in which I want your Advice, and on so many other Accounts it is improper We should live in a...
I acknowledge with Pleasure your Letter of the 7 th Ins t : thinking it uncertain whether you may not have left Philadelphia before this reaches that City I shall desire the President to open it provided you should have entered on your Journey northward unaccompanied by him I am induced to do this least the Appointments should be made out before I could make known my Wishes to him they are to...
O how happy should I be, were I to sit down to write you of my dear sisters better health, but alas I cannot. She fails every day & has now grown so weak that she is not able to wride out or even to come below stairs. She still keeps her usual flow of spirits, & sits “like patience on a monument, smiling” even tho in the arms of death. How miserable should I be, my aunt, in seeing my dear...
I received Your Favour of Octob r. 17. last, and have agreably to your Request consulted Deac n Pierce, respecting an Addition to your Dwelling House, He is of opinion that if an Addition be made in Front, (which He supposes to be practicable) it will be necessary to take the east Chimney down; the Floors below & in the Chambers must be taken up as well as some other Parts of the Rooms— upon...
Though the kind remembrance I have of my Sister is imprinted upon my heart, as with a point of a diamond, & can never be erased while vital spirits remain, yet I know not when I have written to her.— The cares & anxieties, the hopes, & the fears, that I should do too much, or not enough for my poor Betsy, I did not wish to trouble you with, or to tell you that my mind has been so agitated...
I have not written to you, since receiving your very kind Letter of 3 d: March. though I received it almost a month ago. I have determined finally to go by the way of England; you will readily conceive that this circumstance together with the necessary attention to the preparations for my departure from this Country, and since the arrival of M r: Murray, the arrangements for introducing him to...
Not a single letter have we received from you since Monday. Uncle sighs and says, I wish Aunt would write oftener and I sigh and say, Ah! if she knew half the happiness her letters gave to you us, I am sure she would write every day in the week. Congress debates have been warm and interesting for two days past on Mr. Griswolds motion respecting punishing interferences in the government &c. but...
I this day receiv’d your kind Letter from Springfield. I Set you down in Brookfield in my mind that day however I think you did right to go on as fast as you could the President must want both you & mr Brisler & could I think you would have any rest after you arriv’d I should feel better about you. but I do hope you will not think of Staying thro the hot months your Life is of too much...
Some lover of your nephews happiness, last thursday added something to the fragment of life, by placing in my hands your agreeable favor of March 20 th. The pamphlet sent me, I give you my sincere thanks. Is not Mr. Pickering the author. As soon as I read it, I thought I could see in it his simple style and forcible reasoning. I had read both Scipio and Munroes view, before I received your...
I cannot Say when I shall be able to sett out. But I shall loose no time here. When the Public Business is in such a state that I can leave it, I shall go, be the Roads as they may.— I expect bad travelling all the Way. Truxton has indeed taken the Insurgent. But We have a silly Insurgence in Northampton County in this state, which will detain me, I suppose, some days This state is not a moral...
It is a long time since I have written to you— My mind has been so agitated that I was not fit to write—or in other words, when I sat for a moment, & attempted to write my paper became so blotted, that I was asshamed to send it— Now do not attempt to reason; for I should feel so conscious that its dictates ought to be obeyed, & so little able to comply, that this would prove another source of...
After your having been three months in the City of Philadelphia at this season of the year I think our good Friend the President and you must want some relaxation, and the sea air for a few weeks will be gratefull to you. as we are agreeably situated near the river I dont feel the want of it. where ever you are I wish health and happyness to attend, and hope you will return perfectly recovered...
Monday Morning, the most agreable in the Week because it brings me Letters from you, has not failed me to day. I have yours of 23 and 25 March. The Correspondence with Plymouth amused me much— The Answer is Superiour to the Letter both in Delicacy, and keenness.— You might have told her, if Chance decides in Elections, it is no better than Descent. But she knows not what she wants. The Letter...
I too have taken my pen with the rising Sun. I have been so disturb’d with the account of the allarming riot before your Door on the fast day evening that I have not had a moments quiet sleep this night. I had no Idea the faction would have tried their Strength So oppenly I suppos’d the Letters which had been thrown into your house were mear threats. but I hope they have but Staid their time—...
The recipt of your affectionate and friendly letter my dear Madam Claims at once my gratitude and love.— how good is that heart that feels for others woes Such is yours,—and may Heaven bless you with health and long life, and may you still Continue to fill every Station of Life that Providence shall Call you to with that dignity humanity and sensibility which has ever been your Characteristick...
In my last I enclosed a rough Plan of the proposed Addition to the Wood House, that Plan will exhibit to You an Idea of the lower Room; since then I have found, that it will not be much more expensive, to take the Roof off from the Wood house & Library and erect a new one over them, than to proceed in the Way that was projected. I have accordingly orderd it to be framd in this Way; upon this...
As the extract which you marked in y r Son’s letter was too long for one paper I divided it & gave one half to Benj n & the other half to John Russell, the latter part appears in the Commercial Gazette of this day, the former I hope will come out on Saturday. I have read Robisons Conspiracy with astonishment, it contains the seeds of all the mischiefs which we have been tormented with for...
You never rec d a Letter from Berlin but with Pleasure: and this I dare say will not be the first.— From Austins in a lowry Morning We proceeded to Hartford and dined at Bulls. A polite Invitation from the County Court to dine with them was declined, and We came on immediately to Squire Rileys. The Coachman thought it would be too hard upon the Horses to go to Wallingford I have now read all...
From Lovejoys at stratford We fixed off M r shaw with a part of the Baggage by the stage for East Chester. Mrs Smith and the fair Caroline came with me to Norwalk to dinner at Gregories, where We were very comfortable. We rode in gentle snow & rain all day and Arrived at Webbs at Night, where We put up till Monday. My Horses want a day of rest. From Quincy to stanford, within 22 miles of East...
By your letter to my brother dated 3. January which he has just received I find that at the time when it was written you had received from us no advices later than the 16 th: of September, a circumstance equally surprizing and mortifying to me. After that date I wrote on the 19 th: and 21 st: of September to my father and on the 4 th: of October addressed to him some observations upon an...
In Consequence of its being a rainy Day and confind at Home I have an opportunity of acknowledging the Receipt of Yours of the 29 th. Ult o. & the 8 th. Ins t. about the 8 th. or 10 th. Instant I wrote to the President and to you also— I have now compleated the Business assigned me respecting the new Building, and such Repairs to the Dwelling House as appeared to be necessary have also been...
I thank you for your kind letter of the 4 th : inst t : which came to hand last evening, accompanied by one from D r : Tufts, enclosed by William. My letters are left usually at M r : Wistar’s and Sarah when she gave me those of last evening—say’s “Thomas, I expect I have got a rich treat for thee; from the number of packets addressed to thee, I should judge thee a favorite among thy friends”—...
Saturday April 21 st , I received yours of the 9 th . I wrote to you the 1 st of April in answer to yours of March 20 th , which before this you must have received, and shall always esteem my letters of inestimable value, so long as they purchase yours. The excellent pamphlet you sent me I thank you. The sentiment it contains—the spirit with which it is written prove to me, that the author...
Vanity of vanity! & the conseiquenc of it is vexation of Spirit— who ever is inclin’d to live beyond their income let them enter the House where plenty hospitality & an appearence of wealth used to be display’d at the moment the mask is fallen of, & they will behold a Scene of distress & woe enough to tear the heart of love & Friendship I have long Suspected Doctor Welsh’s affairs were...
It gives me great pleasure to know you are so near me and I should have told you so and condoled with you and our good Friend the President before this time on the loss of his good Mother had I not been much ingaged in moveing into the City. by what I have heard your loss must be much her gain I think She had lived till She could sing the song of good old Simeon I was flattered by the kind...
I am once more in the same pleasant situation as that which I described to you twenty months ago from Helvoetsluys. Nine days since, we left the Hague, and I believe you will think I have at least as much occasion for Patience and Philosophy as I had upon the former occasion. I am going to London, where I shall stay no longer than will be absolutely necessary, and from whence I intend to...
I last week had to inform you of the Sudden death of my much value’d Freind Mrs Quincy I Now have to acquaint you that last Sunday afternoon in the midst of his Sermon Doctor Clark was struck with an apoplexy & fell down— after he was got into the carriage to be carry’d home he came a little to but Soon seem’d to fall asleep & into a Suoun out of which he never wak’d & ceas’d to breath about 3...
I write again my dear Sister because I know you love to hear from me, & not that I have any thing important to communicate I was disappointed by not having a line from you yesterday as you clos’d your last Letter of Feb. 1 d by Saying you had just receiv’d one from me which you Should reply to the next day I went to Boston a Friday with mr & mrs Black in their Sleigh & return’d with them the...
Your welcome letter of the 20 th instant I did not receive till last evening, on our return from Mount Vernon, where we had spent a very agreeable week, and left General and Mr s Washington in perfect health. they often mentioned the President and yourself much wishing to see you at Mount Vernon. I am truly happy to find my account gave satisfaction, as to Mr Daltons conduct in the affair of...
Yours of 25 Ult. is rec d. — Thomas is to Sett off from N. York to day for Quincy and I wish him a pleasant Journey, which the fine Weather and convenient Snow promises. An happy Sight of his Friends, will come of course, without Accidents. He found his Father, forty Years Older than when he left him, and if he finds his Mother advanced only ten, it may be an agreable disappointment to him.—...