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Documents filtered by: Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 131-140 of 13,769 sorted by date (descending)
on Some Momentuos Occasions heretofore I have taken the liberty to Addres you I Must now Once more Transgress on your Patience to Congratulate your Election and particularly So after Such an Obstinate Party Resistance The Happines here among Republicans are Beyond Expresion and I Believe the Gloom is as much So with the Opposite & obstinate The Milder ones appear well Satisfyed. The Matter in...
I have spoke to James according to your Desire he has made mention again as he did before that he was willing to serve you before any other man in the Union but sence he understands that he would have to be among strange servants he would be very much obliged to you if you would send him a few lines of engagement and on what conditions and what wages you would please to give him with your own...
The bookbinder promises me 40. copies of the Manual on Thursday morning. your’s therefore might be offered for sale on Saturday. A commee of the H. of R. communicated to me the record of their having elected me &c. I took that occasion to make my acknolegements to the House & to the nation. their communication & my answer are entered on the Journals of the house, & I wish them published. I...
I take the liberty of asking the protection of your cover for a letter to Lieutt. Meriwether Lewis, not knowing where he may be. in selecting a private secretary, I have thought it would be advantageous to take one who possessing a knolege of the Western country, of the army & it’s situation, might sometimes aid us with informations of detail, which we may not otherwise possess. a personal...
Not knowing where the persons to whom the [enclosed are?] directed, may be at this time, and believing that this knoledge may [be] acquired at Pittsburg, I have taken the liberty of putting them under cover to you, and of adding a sollicitation that you would be so good as to address and forward them by any conveyance which may occur to the persons for whom they are, wheresoever they may...
After my ill success hitherto, I ought perhaps in prudence to say nothing further on the subject. But situated as things now are I certainly have no advice to give. Yet I may without impropriety communicate a fact. It is this—Colonel Burr is taking an active personal part in favour of Mr Clinton against Mr Rensselaer as Governor of this State. I have upon my honor direct & indubitable evidence...
I wrote to Maria on the 15th. inst. yours of the 12th. was recieved on the 18th. mr Tyler who was the bearer of my letter to Maria, set out so instantly after the event of the election that I could not write, but as he had promised to send Maria’s letter, he would probably notify that event at the same time. I cannot regret entirely the disappointment of meeting Maria & yourself at Monticello...
You mentioned to me in conversation here that you sometimes saw my former servant James, & that he made his engagements such as to keep himself always free to come to me. could I get the favor of you to send for him & to tell him I shall be glad to recieve him as soon as he can come to me? Francis Sayes who also lived with me formerly and, since that, with you, came here some time ago to offer...
Entreating you will pardon the liberty I now take, not having the honor of being known to Your Excellency.—& complying with Mr. Jenings request, by the accompanying letter, I have the pleasure to enclose, the suppos’d necessary papers , for your acceptance, of what we are willing to persuade ourselves, (from your very kind Correspondence with Mrs. Randolph,) your Excellency will be so obliging...
The United States have now time to contemplate the late astonishing political Scenery. That incongruous aggregation; the high toned federal faction, the staunch old tories, the whole tribe of English renegadoes & apostate Americans, with views widely distinct from each other. Again the Lancasten & Spartan band, the conflagration of public offices and the last expiring struggle in congress;...