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I have this morning received, with great Pleasure, the Letter you did me the Honor to write me, on the Seventeenth of this month. Although a Visit to the City of Washington would give me great Pleasure, and chiefly for the opportunity it would afford me of paying my Respects at Mount Vernon; Yet I cannot but consider the execution of the Plan, as very uncertain. I thank you, Sir, for your...
Mr Mc Henry the Secretary at War, will have the honor to wait on you, in my behalf to impart to you a step I have ventured to take, & which I should have been happy to have communicated in person, if such a journey had been at this time in my power. As I said in a former letter, if it had been in my power to nominate you to be President of the United States, I should have done it, with less...
I received, Yesterday the Letter you did me the Honor to write me on the 25th. of September. You request to be informed, whether my determination to reverse the order of the three Major Generals, is final.—and whether I mean to appoint another Adjutant General without your Concurrence.—I presume, that before this Day you have received Information, from the Secretary at War, that I some time...
Although I received the Honor of your Letter of the first of this month in its Season, I determined to postpone my Answer to it, till I had deliberated, on it, and the Letter from Barlow inclosed in it, as well as a multitude of other Letters and Documents official and unofficial, which relate to the Same Subject, and determined what Part to act. I Yesterday determined to nominate Mr. Murray...
The receipt two days since of your letter of the 21 instant gave me sincere pleasure. The token of your regard, which it announces, is very precious to me, and will always be rememberd as it ought to be. Mrs. Hamilton has lately added another boy to our Stock. She and the Child are both well. She desires to be affectionately remembered to Mrs. Washington & yourself. We have nothing new here...
At the present dangerous crisis of public affairs, I make no apology for troubling you with a political letter. Your impressions of our situation, I am persuaded, are not different from mine. There is certainly great probability that we may have to enter into a very serious struggle with France; and it is more and more evident that the powerful faction which has for years opposed the...
I have before me your favour of the 27. of May. The suggestion in my last was an indigested thought begotten by my anxiety. I have no doubt that your view of it is accurate & well founded. It is a great satisfaction to me to ascertain what I had anticipated in hope, that you are not determined in an adequate emergency against affording once more your Military services. There is no one but...
I was much surprized on my arrival here to discover that your nomination had been without any previous consultation of you. Convinced of the goodness of the motives it would be useless to scan the propriety of the step. It is taken and the question is—what under the circumstances ought to be done? I use the liberty which my attachment to you and to the public authorises to offer my opinion...
[ Philadelphia, July 28, 1798. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
Your letter of the 14th instant did not reach me ’till after the appointments mentioned in it were made. I see clearly in what has been done a new mark of your confidence, which I value as I ought to do. With regard to the delicate subject of the relative rank of the Major Generals, it is very natural for me to be partial judge, and it is not very easy for me to speak upon it. If I know myself...
A necessary absence from this City prevented the receipt of your letter of the 9th instant till yesterday. It is very grateful to me to discover in each succeeding occurrence a new mark of your friendship towards me. Time will evince that it makes the impression it ought on my mind. The effect which the course of the late military appointments has produced on General Knox though not very...
Your obliging favour of the 24th instant has duly come to hand. I see in it a new proof of sentiments towards me which are truly gratifying. But permit me to add my request to the suggestion of your own prudence, that no personal considerations for me may induce more on your part than on mature reflection you may think due to public motives. It is extremely foreign to my wish to create to you...
Some ill health in my family, now at an end as I hope, interfered with an earlier acknowlegement of your favour of the 21st instant. The contents cannot but be gratifying to me. It is my intention, if not prevented by further ill health in my family, to proceed on the first of November to Trenton. My aid to the Secretary to the full extent of what he shall permit me to afford will not be...
It appears by a letter from the President, dated Quincy Octr. 22. 1798, that it will not be in his power to be in Philadelphia ’till near the time fixed upon for the meeting of Congress. In order however to prevent any injury to the public service, as it respects officering the troops, directed to be raised by the late acts of Congress, he has written to me as follows: “If you, and the...
General Hamilton presents his respects to the Commander in Chief & sends the sketch of a letter in conformity to what passed this morning.
The Secretary at War has communicated to me the following disposition with regard to the superintendence of our Military forces and Posts. All those in States South of Maryland in Tennessee and Kentucke are placed under the Direction of Major General Pinckney: those every where else under my direction—to which he has added the general care of the Recruiting service. The commencement of the...
Different reasons have conspired to prevent my writing to you since my return to New York —the multiplicity of my avocations, an imperfect state of health and the want of something material to communicate. The official letter herewith transmitted will inform you of the disposition of our military affairs which has been recently adopted by the Department of War. There shall be no want of...
Unwilling to take the liberty to ask you to give yourself any particular trouble on the subject I have written the enclosed letters. I beg you to dispose of them as you suppose will best answer the end in view—that is to obtain a speedy distribution of the State into Districts and sub-districts. With the truest attachment   I have the honor to be My Dear Sir   Your obed servant ALS , George...
I have the honor to send you the extract of a letter of the 8th instant (received two days since) from the Secretary of War, together with the Section of the Act to which it relates. I am entirely of opinion with him, as to the expediency of causing the Pay Master General to reside at the seat of Government. But as the measure is of importance, and especially as the act expressly refers the...
[New York, March 14, 1799. Second letter of March 14 not found.] In the “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries, two letters from H are listed for March 14, 1799.
At length we are on the point of commencing the recruiting service in five of the States, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pensylvania & Delaware. It is hoped, that it will not be long in successively embracing the others, where officers have been appointed. But in our affairs ’till a thing is actually begun, there is no calculating the delays which may ensue. You have been informed that the...
Agreeably to your letter of the 25th of March, which with its inclosures have come duly to hand, I have written to the Pay Master General to repair to the Seat of Government. Your letter to Col Hamtranck goes by the same opportunity. The arrangements for beginning to recruit in the States of Connecticut, New York, Jersey, Pensylvania and Delaware, are so mature that it will be very...
New York, April 17, 1799. “I have the honor of your letter of the 10th. instant.… The alterations you suggest are adopted.…” LS , in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; copy, in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress.
At length the recruiting for the additional regiments has begun in Connecticut New York New Jersey Pensylvania and Delaware . The enclosed return of cloathing will sufficiently explain to you that it has commenced at least as soon as the preparations by the Department of War would permit. It might now also proceed in Maryland and Massachusettes, and the next post will I trust enable me to add...
I did myself the honor to write to you at some length on the 3 of May. I hope the letter got safe to hand. The recruiting service is now in motion, in Maryland, Delaware Pensylvania New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and Massachusettes. I might perhaps add Virginia, from the assurances which I have received as to the transmission of supplies. But I am not as yet informed of its actual...
I wrote to you a few days since chiefly to inform you of the progress of the measures respecting the recruiting service & that the symptoms with regard to it were sufficiently promising. The accounts continue favourable. I have just received a letter from General Wilkinson dated the 13 of April, in which he assures me that he will set out in the ensuing month for the seat of Government. The...
I was yesterday honored with your letter of the 14th. instant. The recommendations of Captains Taylor and Blue will not fail to be considered when the situation of things is mature for the appointment of Brigade Inspectors. Inclosed you will find a general abstract of the recruiting Returns, which at its date were received at the Office of the Adjutant General. Other Information induces me to...
Two days since, I received from General Wilkinson a Report of which I now send you the original. You will find it intelligent and interesting. Perhaps on the score of intrinsic propriety it deserves to be adopted to a larger extent than some collateral and extraneous considerations may permit. I had previously thought of the subject but had purposely limited myself to a few very general ideas,...
I had the pleasure of receiving in due time your letter of the 15th. instant. The suggestions it contains will be maturely weighed. I postpone any thing definitive, till the return of General Wilkinson which is momently expected. The other Documents, besides No. 8, which accompanied this letter, were not material to the consideration of its contents, or they would have been forwarded. Even...
On my return from Trenton, the day before yesterday, I found your private letter of the 13th. as well as yr. public letter of the 15th. instant. The News papers have probably informed you that poor Avery is dead of yellow fever. The President has resolved to send the commissioners to France notwithstanding the change of affairs there. He is not understood to have consulted either of his...
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt two days since of your letter of the 15th. instant, at which time I also received one from Col: Parker, informing me of the selection of ground which he had made. You will see by the enclosed letter to him the impression which his communication has made on my mind. I trust that it must be erroneous, since my supposition does not agree with the spirit...
I have been duly honored with your letters of the 26th. and 27th. of October. General Pinckney happening to be at my house when they were received, I communicated them to him, together with such other letters as had come to hand relating to the same subject —and I have since furnished him with the subsequent information transmitted to me, in order that he might take the proper measures in...
[ New York, November 19, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
Enclosed is a copy of a letter which I have written to the Secretary of War on the subject of a military Academy. Two reasons have prevented me from communicating it to you at an earlier day. My avocations rendered it imposible for me to complete the letter till very lately, and I had had opportunities of knowing your opinion on the subject generally. Any alterations in the plan which you may...
I find that I omitted m in my official reply to avail say any thing on the subject of Major Campbell. On the appointments of this kind for the Troops South of Potowmack it is my intention particularly to consult General Pinckney with the advantage of the observations he shall make on the spot. But I do not publish this lest I should subject the General to embarrassment & ill will. Very Affect...
I should derive particular satisfaction from General Washington’s acceptance of a brace of Turkish pistols of curious workmanship now intrusted to a young gentleman with that view. They once form’d part of the military equipage of Field Mareschal Count Lowenthal and descended to a worthy grandson who a few weeks before he died handed them to me. A Sense of personal obligation and his having...
I have your most Esteemed favour of the 27th February by Mr Root now before me, and have the Honour of mentioning to you in Reply that Root also Delivered me the horse you were pleased to return which is, as I mentioned in my last, no manner of Disapointment to me, Their being an Imediate purchaser for him, That I now inclose the ballance remaining in my hands amounting to one Hundred Sixty...
As preperation for your departure will not conveniently admit of your receiving any more visits, you will suffer me in this manner, to bid you a most respectful and most cordial, farewell. With the same ardour that I have sought the felecity and glory of your Administration: do I now implore for you in repose, those sublime pleasures from a review of the past and perspective of the future,...
Having been told you intend leaving Town tomorrow I have sent the Clod of Grass, together with a plant of the upright Italian Myrtle & one of the Box leaved Myrtle for Mrs Washington. The plants will very safely bear the Journey as they are packed in the Basket, provided it is kept in an upright position out of the reach of Frost which would injure the Myrtles in their present growing State...
Quoi que Les Circonstances m’aient Empechée de participer a toutes Les fettes publiques, ou Se Sont manifesté a La fois deux Sentiments bien diffirent; La joise de votre naissance et Le regrés de votre retraïte, croyes Monsieur que je n’ai pas moins été affectée des mème Sensations, et quoi qu’Etrangere et Sans interet personnel au dernier de ces Evenements important, il m’est impossible de ne...
I send herewith the Seal you was pleased to commit to my Care—The time has been scarcely sufficient for the purpose. The Letter to Mrs Ferguson has been forwarded with one from myself, in the manner you requested. As I may not have the pleasure of seeing you again before you leave the City, permit me once more to express my most affectionate wishes for your health & happiness, and most...
Pardon the liberty an unknown person, assumes, by calling you brother; we are so by nature, having one common father, which is Adam; but we are particularly so, in being both members of an order, as ancient as it is honourable—whose principles are “brotherly love relief and truth”—whose ornaments are “wisdom strength and beauty.” Emboldened by the last consideration, I hesitate not in...
I wrote You on 1st And since have Yours of 27 Ultimo with Mr Carters letter —I now beg leave to hand reports of last week. And nothing particular having Occured since my last leaves me little matter of information—especially as I hope You will soon be at Your Seat, when this paper correspondence will be exchanged for my letter—As directed I forwarded your letter to Mr Carter And a Note from...
The General Assembly, which convened at East Greenwich on the twenty-seventh of February, having continued in Session until the Night before last, I had not the Opportunity of transmitting the inclosed Address. I have now the Pleasure of doing it, and of assuring you that I am, with every Sentiment of Esteem and Respect, Sir, Your most obedient, and Most humble Servant LS , DLC:GW ; LB ,...
Like a true Woman (as you will think) in the Moment of Exultation, and on the first Impulse (for you know we are never supposed to act Systematically or from attentive Consideration,[)] I take up my Pen to address you, as you have given me a complete Triumph on the Subject of all others on which you have I suppose thought me most deficient, and most opposite to yourself; and what is still more...
To partake of the prosperity arising from your unwearied attention to the Welfare of our Country—To admire that firmness which has never been disconcerted in the greatest difficulties, and which has acquired vigor in proportion to the exigency. To feel that honorable ascendancy you have obtained in the well founded opinion of your fellow Citizens by a Wise administration, and the exercise of...
Your favr of the 27th ulmo came to hand three days ago just when I was puting into the Office a Letter of congratulation to meet you at your assylum from the Labors of a weighty Trust. Abstracted from self I can withdraw from an high Idea of the importance of our Loss and am capable of exulting in the calm delights of the Man I love and whom e’er long I may have permission to call by the...
A number of the Inhabitants of this town & its Vicinity wish to have the pleasure of meeting you on your entrance into the State & escorting you to Mt Vernon[.] As they flatter themselves that this token of their sincere affection & esteem will not meet your disapprobation, they have dispatched the bearer & request you will let them know at what time you will probably cross the ferry that they...
However as a citizen I may depricate the consequences of your retirement from the helm of our political barque in the present lowering season, yet as your friend I sincerely congratulate you on having eased your body and mind of that heavy and anxious weight, & returned to a tranquil private life with both in full vigor enabling you to enjoy the sweets of domestic ease and social converse,...
I have taken the liberty to introduce your August & immortal name in a short sentence (see Page 58) which is to be found in the Book I send to you. I have a large acquaintance amongst the most valuable & exalted classes of men; but you are the only Human being for whome I ever felt an aweful reverence. I sincerely pray God to grant a long and serene evening to a life so gloriously devoted to...