You
have
selected

  • Author

    • McHenry, James
  • Recipient

    • Washington, George
    • Washington, George
  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="McHenry, James" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 1-10 of 71 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have recd your private letter of the 17th Novr ulto, since which I have been very closely engaged in business. The inclosed news paper contains the Presidents speech delivered to-day. You will find it nearly what it ought to be, I had feared he would have entered into reasoning upon a certain measure which had he would most assuredly have attracted to the subject a very pointed direct or...
My attention, for some time past, has been so completely engrossed, that notwithstanding my earnest wish to communicate with you upon several subjects, I could not without neglecting some urgent business devote any moments to that purpose. In truth, the stone, however near I may seem to get it to the summit of the mountain, is perpetually upon the recoil, and demands constant exertion and...
Inclosed are the rules which have been adopted by the President of the United States relative to rank and promotion in the Army. It is requested that you will as speedily as the nature of the case and circumstances admit determine the relative rank of the field officers of the Regiment of Cavalry, and of the 12 regiments of Infantry raised in pursuance of the Act of the 16 July 1798. For your...
As the Letters from the Colonels and Majors do not exactly agree with the records of the War department, it has been thought proper to annex to such of them as were in service during the late War, the time of their entering and quitting the service as entered in the Books and settlements of the Office. Lieutenant Colonels John Smith Captain 1 April 1778 deranged 1 Jany 1783 James Read Captain...
At length the articles for my young friend has been procurr’d and is now waiting for a conveyance. There is a vessel up for Alexandria which I am informed is to sail in a day or two. I shall send them on board to day directed to the care of Col. Fitzgerald. They are in two small boxes. The sword is well wrapped up and directed in like manner. The office will move on monday to Trenton. Yours...
Governor Davie of N. Carolina sent me by the last mail, three copies of a little work of his intitled, “instructions to be observed for the formations and movements of Cavalry,” one of which he requested me, which I now do, to present to the commander in chief. I do not recollect whether I mentioned to you, that he is one in the Commission to the Directory. The President has directed the...
Mr Murray has executed his instructions and Mr Pickering has received from him the answer of Mr Talyrand ⟨so⟩ that Mr Elsworth &c. will be received according to their functions, and respected agreeably to the law of nations, and one or several persons be duly appointed to treat with them. So far the answer would seem a compliance with the conditions announced to the Senate by the President....
Mr Bordley left the inclosed collection of his works with me with a request that I should forward it to you. There are some useful things in the book, but I believe little of it his own. Francis has procured the Sword for our young warrior, and tells me, the helmit will soon be finished, when the whole will be forwarded. It appears by a letter from Mr Murray to the Secy of State, that he had...
I received yesterday your private letter of the 25th inst. and its inclosures which I now return. The objections you suggest relative to the promotion of the officer in question are intitled to very serious consideration. Major Generals Lee & Hand may expect a station in the regular army, and certainly the Eastern quarter of the Union will not be pleased unless they have in it one Major...
After every exertion Mr McAlpin has been able to make, and after having procured the gold thread and a man who pretended to be fully competent to working it, he has been obliged to suspend the whole operation. The man was ignorant, and no person can be found more skilful. He has therefore prefered, rather than send you what I am sure you would not wear, sending the coat to England where it...