You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Pickering, Timothy
  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 5

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 215 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I received last evening your letter of 5. May, and having written you twice within a fortnight have now not much to say.—But I cannot forbear to give you my best thanks for your care relative to my affairs both at Boston and New York, as well as your own use and employment of the authority which I gave you to draw in my behalf—I fully approve of all your proceedings. I have this day drawn upon...
The President of the U S. requests the Secy of State, the Secy of the treasury, the Secy of War and the Atty. general to take into consideration the state of the nation and its foreign relations especially with France. These indeed may be so connected with these, with England Spain Holland and others that perhaps the former cannot be well weighed without the other. If our Envoys extraordinary...
With Mr. Davis’s report of the 8th I enclose all the papers relative to the complaint of Mr Liston against Capt Laskey & Capt Mugford & am Sir your most obedient I return also Carnots pamphlet. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The president of the U.S. requests the Secretary of State to prepare copies of the remaining papers of our late Envoys to France to be laid before congress at an as early day as possible MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The enclosure, contained in Colo. Henleys letter to me (which with the letter itself is forwarded) needs no comment. Had it come to me as a confidential communication, the transmission of it to you, might have been attended with some embarrassment; but as it is free from this, I have no hesitation in making the government acquainted with this transaction. The presumption indeed, and I hope the...
I received your favor of the 12th only on the 20th. Gen. Dickerson introduced to me at Philadelphia Mr. Evan Jones, whose appearance deportment, & conversation were such as might be expected from a brother of that family—such as might be expected from Gen Dickerson’s recommendation. I am perfectly satisfyed that you should give him a commission as consul, provided you think it can be done...
I have recd your private Letter of the 11th. which contains matter of importance, but unnecessary to be considered and answered particularly by me, because I have in another Letter written this morning referred the whole Subject to your final decision. The manual Exercise of Writing has become almost as painfull to me, as a blow upon the Elbow or the Knee, which induces me to Spare almost...
I last night received your favor of the 10th: Mr Liston’s note of the 8th was not inclosed as you intended. Mr. Barclay I know & his Exequator will be ready. Mr. Moodie I know not, nor do I know or suspect any objection to him. I thank you for the account of the tryal of Fries, which if it was attended to by as numerous a concourse of people in Philadelphia, as it would have been in some other...
I thank you for the favor of your letter of 24 June, & the copies inclosed of dispatches from Stevens & Maitland, which I suppose it is unnecessary for me to return. The necessary alterations in the proclamation will of course be made by you, with the advice of the heads of department. Harmony with the English in all this business of St. Domingo, is the thing I have most at heart. The result...
The inclosed protest & certificates I received last night with the letter from Capt. Ebenezer Giles, late commander of the schooner Betsey. This gentleman made me a visit some weeks ago, to complain to me in person of the horrid treatment he received from the commander of the Ship Daphne, a British vessel of war. He has now sent me the papers & expects that government will espouse his cause. I...
Inclosed is a letter from Joseph Covachich at Barcelona requesting to be consul at Marseilles which you will please to file among other applications to be considered in due time I am Sir &c. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Your letter of the 12th Ulto came duly to hand, but the expectation that Congress would rise sooner than it really did, in the first place; and the supposition that Mr Craik would return home, so Soon as [it] did rise in the next, have delayed my acknowledgment of its receipt, and giving direction relative to the money paid you on my A/c by Judge Addison, until now. But learning from Doctr...
I am this moment favored with yours of this date, & thank you for the information it contains. It was proper to publish the news in Mr. Humphry’s letter. I return you Mr. Kings, as well as his. The assurances you propose to convey through Mr. King to the court of Denmark, that their consul will be cordially received are very agreeable to me.—I hope to meet you in Philadelphia on the course of...
I have just now, recd. your favour of the 6th. I am glad Mr. Winchester has accepted his Commission. I return your Sons Extract from Liancourts Travels. Who could have put into his head, falsehoods so absurd and so gross? It could not be Simcoe. Absurd as he often was he could not have been guilty of this folly which is almost too palpable for our own Jacobinical Prints. Why have We no Copy of...
You no doubt have seen my pamphlet respecting the conduct and character of President Adams. The press teems with replies, and I may finally think it expedient to publish a second time. In this case I shall reinforce my charges by new anecdotes. My friends will no doubt be disposed to aid me. You probably possess some which are unknown to me. Pray let me have them without delay. You will...
I return you Mr. Kings letters of July 28th. August 1 & 5 inclosed in yours of Oct 3d. received yesterday: These letters are very important & some of them should be made publick. With great esteem &c MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I return to you my answer to the volunteer corps of the Infantry at Lancaster. I pray you to communicate this to Mr. McHenry that he may send the commissions. I am &c. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The last Mail brought me your favour of the 24th instant, covering a letter from General Kosciuszko. And presuming that the Attorney General is on his way to Virginia, I hope to receive, soon, the Packets you committed to his charge. Not knowing where Genl Kosciuszko may be, I pray your care of the enclosed to him, as it is probable his movements will be known to you. It is with extreme regret...
I have received your private letter of the 11th, which contains matter of importance, but unnecessary to be considered & answered particularly by me, because I have in another letter, written this morning, referred the whole subject to your final decision. The manual exercise of writeing has become almost as painful to me, as a blow upon the elbow, or the knee, which induces me to spare almost...
I have received your favor of Oct 18 & pray you when you see Gen. Pinckney to congratulate him for me on his arrival; but I would not wish him to think of a journey here to see me. I shall see him I hope e’er long at Trenton or Philadelphia. The two letters returned in yours are important. The first has made a great impression on me. Inclosed is another letter which I pray you to decypher &...
I received upon my Arrival here your favour of the 25th with the Commissions, all of which I have signed and My son will transmit them to you. The Weather was yesterday so hot, that I came very nigh destroying my Horses, and is not moderated this morning. I am, Sir your most obedient / and humble servant ICU : Miscellaneous Papers.
I thank Mr. Bordley kindly for his Book and you for your care and trouble in Sending it. I have a great Opinion of Mr. Bordleys Experience, skill and Knowledge in Husbandry and should have great delight in trying his Experiments, if I was not obliged to recollect and apply to myself President Washingtons Words to me, a few days before he went out and I came in. “Sir, I have read nothing these...
I have recd. your Favour of the 16th. The Speech of Pastoret I had before received by two Conveyances from France, from an old Acquaintance, whom I had not heard from, before for thirteen Years. The Applications from Dr. Hall, and General Miller as well as that of Col. Francis Nicholls mentioned in your Letter of the 12th, and those of Mr. Huger and Dr. Conover mentioned in your two Letters of...
I return you the three letters to the Queen of Portugal signed, which were inclosed in your favor of the 20th of March. From an accquaintance, which I have ever considered as a friendship, with the Chevalier De Freire for thirteen or fourteen years, and from the pleasure I always received from his society, I regrett very much his departure from the United States. Whatever civilities or...
Diverse Causes and considerations essential to the Administration of the Government, in my Judgment requiring a Change in the Department of State you are hereby discharged from any further Service as Secretary of State. MHi : Timothy Pickering Papers.
I have received your favor of the 16th & read the letter of Mr B. H. Phillips, our consul at Curacao of 20th July, & the papers inclosed with it, which I now return. It is right to communicate these documents to Mr. Van Polaner & to Mr Murray, and to remonstrate in clear language to the government, of the Batavian government against the partiality of the govenor & councils & the scandalous...
Since writing to you a few days ago, I have been favoured with your letters of the 26th and 30th Ulto. If you should have occasion to write to Mr Parish of Hamburg, you would oblige me, by thanking him in my behalf, for his very polite & friendly offer of sending me any thing I might have occasion for from that place. It would be more formal than necessary, to introduce Mr Bucknall’s...
I return you Mr. Fosters Letter, and your answer, together with the Abby Lambins’ Letter to Mr. Foster and the Arrete inclosed. Your answer to Mr. Foster is wise and prudent. How ready is the Spider to dart along his invisible Line, upon a fly, that he thinks he sees off his guard? In this Case however it will appear I hope and believe, that the intended Prey, our good hearted friend, has been...
I have received your favor of the 10th. Mr. Shaw discovered his omission of numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5 and the paper of extracts & sent them on the next day. I hope you received them in course.—I have read the address to the independent electors of Pennsylvania, & am very curious to know, where all this will end. The trial will bring out some whimsical things. At present I will say nothing. I...
I return signed, the blank commission, intended for Mr Jones to be consul at New Orleans. I return to you, Mr. Liston’s note of the 10th of April. I consider this handsome present of his Brittanic majesty, as a testimony of his friendship to the United States, & I request you to communicate through Mr. Liston, the thanks of the American government for this mark of his majestys confidence in...
Your letters of the 24th of the last, and 2d of the present Month, have been duly received; for which, & their enclosures, I thank you. I am not surprised that some Members of the Ho. of Representatives should dis-relish your Report. It contains remarks, and speaks truths which they are desirous should be unknown to the People. I wish the parts which were left out, had been retained. The...
I have your favor of the 13th received only last night. I sent you lately Mr. Listons two letters with one from Govenor Miflin & a copy from chief justice McKean. I will not comment on the letters of Mr. Liston nor examine whether all his sentiments are just or politick. But I heartily reprobate the outrage on the British government in violating the seals of its accredited minister to the...
I have received your letter of June 26th. & return the Exequatur for Mr Barclay signed.—Whatever irregularity there may be in this I suppose it may be justifyed by a particular regard to Mr Liston & Mr. Barclay as well as by an earnest desire to cultivate a good understanding with their government MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I thank you for your favor of 29th of July, incloseing Mr. Murrays of 7th of May & copy of Mr. Murrays instructions. The business is well enough done by Mr. Murray, & now let citizen directors chichane if they will, or be candid if they can. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I return signed the two patents to Christian Febiger & am / Sir &c MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Inclosed I return you the address from the Military and other Citizens of Burlington, with my answer a copy of which I have sent to Martin Chittenden and Ebenr Torney Englesby Their Committee. I am / Sir Your Obt. Servt MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
There are many things which deserve to be maturely considered before the meeting of congress. I shall mention two or three at present, concerning which I pray you to take as early measures as possible to obtain the advice of the heads of departments. One of them is, whether it will be expedient for the president to recommend to the consideration of congress a declaration of war against France....
I think it will be expedient to lay before congress, on the second day of the session, all the papers which relate to the embassy to France, that they may be printed together, & the public enabled to judge from correct and authentic documents. To this end I request you to order copies to be made of your letter to Mr. Murray & his answer, of his letter to Talleyrand & his answer which should be...
I received yesterday your favor of the 2d. I have considered the petition of Warrall and return you his pardon signed.—The copies of the Instructions and dispatches I have received. I will thank you to send me a Copy or two of the Laws of the last Session compleat.— I have the Honor to be Sir / yr mo Obt. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have recd. your Letter of Aug. 24 and pray you to keep the Packets from Sir John Sinclair till my return. This Agricultural Patriot and Hero has sent me Letters and Packets for Seven Years not one of which have I answered, but still he persevered.—I am not much charmed with the honour of being elected a Member of any Society in Europe especially in England, at this Crisis: but as it is owing...
I request you to order fair copies of the instructions, as corrected last evening, to be prepared and delivered to Judge Elsworth & Govenor Davie, with another for Mr. Murray without loss of time, & to write a letter to those gentlemen, as Envoys Extraordinary to the French republic, expressing with the affectionate respects of the President, his desire that they would take their passage for...
I have received your Letters of Septr 14. 15. and 19th. The Letters inclosed in them, from Govr. Sinclair, Judge Patterson and Dr. James Sykes, I return to you inclosed with this, that you may be able to preserve together all the Papers, relative to the successor to Dr. Way in the Treasury of the Mint. Tomorrow I shall sett out on my Journey to the Southward, and shall Stop at East Chester...
Last night I received your favor of the 22d. and rejoice to find you have received dispatches from Stevens and Maitland. If the British merchant vessels are to enter the ports of Cape Francoise & Port au Prince under a flagg of truce, and ours are not & if an agent from the British government is not admitted, while one from the United States is, this will render it more necessary for us to be...
Inclosed is a Duplicate of a Letter from Miranda with some Estimates. Read it and think of it. A number of questions and considerations over . We are Friends with Spain. If We were Ennemies, would the Project be usefull to us.—It will not be in for me to answer the Letter. Will any Notice of it, in any manner be proper. I shall send it by Mr. Humphreys, with Mr. Gerrys Papers. I am &c. MHi :...
I return you Mr. Murrays letters of May 28. June 13 & 22d, July 13 & 15 & the parts of newspapers inclosed with them. The private letter you sent me from Mr Murray, sometime ago, contained much such a review of the pamphlet of Boulay de la Meurthe. I have been anxious to see it, but it is not yet arrived. A parrallel between the English republic & the French must be a curious thing. I have...
On the 5th: instt: I had a n private audience of the king and delivered to him my credential Letter, which he received with the strongest assurances of satisfaction and his friendly disposition towards the United States.—In presenting the Letter, I took notice agreeable to your orders, in the usual manner of the decease of the late king and of the accession of his present Majesty to the...
I received last night, your favor of the 23d. I am very glad to be informed, that the instructions for the envoys will be prepared in a few days, & that you have written to Mr Davie What think you of our envoys landing at Lisbon, & the frigate that carries them, takeing Mr. Smith to Constantinople, or cruising on the Spanish coast or in the Mediteranean? I am not for delaying the negotiation...
Confidential Dear Sir, Mount Vernon 3d March 1799 The unexpectedness of the event, communicated in your letter of the 21st Ulto, did, as you may suppose, surprise me not a little. But far, very far indeed was this surprise short of what I experienced the next day, when by a very intelligent Gentmn (immediately from Philadelphia) I was informed that there had been no direct overture from the...
The President of the United States requests the Secretary of State to take into his Consideration, the following Questions, and make report of his Opinion in writing. 1. Whether the refusal to receive Mr. Pinckney, and the rude orders to quit Paris, and the Territory of the Republic, with Such circumstances of Indignity, Insult and Hostility, as we have been informed of are Bars to all further...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to the Secretary of state [&] sends him Champlain’s travels which he recieved by the last post, the person whom he desired to search his library , could not, on his first [look], find Escarbot: but promised to examine again, before the next post. Th:J. knows that it is in the library, and therefore hopes it will be found. he is happy in this occasion of...