You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Pickering, Timothy
  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 5

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 1-50 of 215 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
The President of the United States requests the Secretary of State to take into his Consideration, the following Questions, and make report of his Opinion in writing. 1. Whether the refusal to receive Mr. Pinckney, and the rude orders to quit Paris, and the Territory of the Republic, with Such circumstances of Indignity, Insult and Hostility, as we have been informed of are Bars to all further...
The pressure of business in the last days of my administration, occasioned my dispatching the enclosed Instrument to the Commissioners of this City without the Seal of the United States (as certified); and I should not have known it wanted this evidence, had not those Gentlemen (upon my arrival here) informed me of the omission. I now forward it for the purpose of having this defect remedied;...
It is now ascertained that Mr Pinckney has been refused and with circumstances of indignity. What is to be done? The share I have had in the public administration added to my interest as a Citizen make me extremely anxious that at this delicate Crisis a course of conduct exactly proper may be adopted. I offer to your consideration without ceremony what appears to me such a course. First. I...
The post of yesterday brought me your letter of the day before. I regret that the idea of a Commission extraordinary appears of doubtful propriety. For after very mature reflection I am intirely convinced of its expediency. I do not understand the passage you cite as excluding the reception of a special extraordinary Minister but of an ordinary resident Minister. It seems impossible that the...
I have received your letter of the 30th. with the statement inclosed. I do not believe that its publication would have any influence upon the question of a rupture with France; but yet, as it seems that those who surround the President are not agreed in the matter—as an opinion is industriously circulated that too much fuel has been added by the publications of the Government—as it is...
Your favor of the 5th instt with its enclosures, and also one of prior date, forwarding (at the request of Doctr Edwards) a Pamphlet from Sir John Sinclair have come duly to hand. For your kindness in sending these, & particularly for the information given in your letter of the 5th I feel myself very much obliged. The conduct of the French Directory towards General Pinckney is, I believe,...
The President of the United States requests the Secretary of State, to commit to writing in detail, and report to the President as early as may be convenient, such particulars as the Secretary may think necessary or expedient to be inserted in the Presidents speech at the opening of the ensuing Congress, under the heads 1. of such Things as ought to be communicated to Congress, concerning the...
Owing to my not sending to the Post Office in Alexandria with the regularity I used to do whilst I was in the exercise of public duties, I did not receive your favor of the 21st instt until yesterday:nor have I before, acknowledged the receipt of your letter of the 11th, which also came safe. Not expecting to have much business to transact in Philadelphia I appointed no Agent there; and if...
On my return here I found your letter of the 29th . The sitting of a Court of Chancery and important business there have unavoidably delayed a reply. Now, it must be much more cursory than I could wish. As to the mission, in some shape or other, the more I have reflected upon it, the more has it appeared to me indispensable. To accomplish, with certainty, a principal object of it—the silencing...
Mr. Goodhue takes on with him a Boston paper, the printer of which states that he has obtained by a Ship just arrived, a London Paper of March 24th; mentionning in positive terms an account just received from the Emperor that in consequence of a combination between Prussia & France he is driven to the necessity of making an immediate peace for the safety of the Empire —that in consequence of...
Your favour of the 6th instt came by the last Post; and I find by my unacknowledged letters, that I am indebted to you also for your letters of the 27th of April, & 16th Ulto. For the Mellon, and other seeds which you were so obliging as to send me, I thank you; and when the Barbary Wheat is received, much attention shall be given to the cultivation of it. The Buckles sent by Colo. Humphreys,...
I now, as intimated in my last, take the liberty of committing the letters herewith sent to your care. The one for Genl Marshall contains others for France. Will you permit me to remind you of the copying machine—the Journals & Laws—which you were so good as to promise you would have the first repaired, an[d] all sent to me. My compliments, in which Mrs Washington joins are offered to Mrs...
The enclosure, contained in Colo. Henleys letter to me (which with the letter itself is forwarded) needs no comment. Had it come to me as a confidential communication, the transmission of it to you, might have been attended with some embarrassment; but as it is free from this, I have no hesitation in making the government acquainted with this transaction. The presumption indeed, and I hope the...
Your letter of the 1st instant was brought to me by the last Post. The Journals of the 1st 2d & 3d Sessions of the first Congress, I have, & no later. These are in folio—one volume of the Senate, and another of the House of Representatives. If no complete set can be had, either in folio or octavo, it would be useless to obtain a copy of what I now possess: but if they are to be continued in...
I again take the liberty of requesting that the letters herewith sent may accompany your dispatches to Mr King —who I also hope will have the goodness to excuse the trouble I give him in this business, to insure the safety of the dispatches. I hope I shall not have occasion to give either of you much more trouble in this way, as correspondencies of this sort were not of my seeking, and I have...
Your favor of the 25th was received by the last Post. Mr Monroe’s application is nothing more than a continuation of the old game, in a new form; and as I presume he means to play it with all the advantages that are to be derived from his auxiliaries here I will thank you for the whole of what will come before the public—now, or then, according to circumstances. I would thank you also for...
In a late letter from the Attorney General (Lee) he has requested a copy of the opinion he gave relative to the recall of Mr Monroe. Among the Packages most likely (as I conceived) to produce it, I have searched for the Original in vain; nor among these do I find the opinions of the Heads of Departments on various other subjects. How to account for this I am unable, unless the bundle...
I have received in course, your letters of July 28th. Aug 1st. 3d and 17th. That of July 28th only inclosed a letter from Mr. Gerry. The Mediteranean passports mentioned in your letter of Aug 1st I signed as soon as possible, & I returned them to you in three packets by the post. I saw Mr. Howel at Boston, Providence & Quincy; but as he said nothing to me on the subject of his salary, I...
I have received your letter of Aug 21st & the packet from Col Moultrie of South Carolina. The subject is so voluminous that I have not yet had time to read all the pamphlets. The letter I have read. I must refer him to you & the Attorney Gen.l to consider whether my first opinion is right or not & that the executive power is not by the constitution or any act of Congress adequate to the...
Sometime since I received the inclosed being directions concerning measures requisite to be pursued to obtain indemnification in cases of Captures by British Cruisers. I laid it by in haste & have since overlooked it. I do not recollect to have seen it in the news papers & yet it appeared to me necessary that it should be so. As it came to me from some one of our public characters in London, I...
Your favours of the 9th, 10th, & 19th instant have been duly received; for your care of my European letters, and attention to the copying Press, Laws of the U.S. and journals of Congress, I feel myself obliged. If the Vessel has not already left Philadelphia, the Tryal, Captn Hand, is up for Alexandria; and will afford a good conveyance for the above articles, as it has other small matters on...
The last Mail brought me your favour of the 24th instant, covering a letter from General Kosciuszko. And presuming that the Attorney General is on his way to Virginia, I hope to receive, soon, the Packets you committed to his charge. Not knowing where Genl Kosciuszko may be, I pray your care of the enclosed to him, as it is probable his movements will be known to you. It is with extreme regret...
I have recd. your Letter of Aug. 24 and pray you to keep the Packets from Sir John Sinclair till my return. This Agricultural Patriot and Hero has sent me Letters and Packets for Seven Years not one of which have I answered, but still he persevered.—I am not much charmed with the honour of being elected a Member of any Society in Europe especially in England, at this Crisis: but as it is owing...
I have read all the Dispatches inclosed in your favour of Aug 26 and have now time only to thank you and Col. McHenry for your Vigilant Attention and judicious Execution of all the Business relative to them. Your Letter to the Chevalier de Yrujo dated the 8 of August I have read with some Attention. The quotations and References I presume to be exact, and the Fact of his Intimacy with Blount,...
It was not till last night that I received your favours of the 5. of the month. I am happy to learn that your Family and office are removed to Trenton, which I hope will proove a Place of Safety from the Contagion of the Plague of Philadelphia, as it is a well chosen Situation for the Business of your office. Dr. Way, I knew not: but his Character is such as excites a deep regret for his...
It was not till last night that I received your favors of the 5th of the month. I am happy to learn that your family and office are removed to Trenton, which I hope will prove a place of safety from the contagion of the plague of Philadelphia, as it is a well-chosen situation for the business of your office. Dr. Way I knew not; but his character is such as excites a deep regret for his death....
I have recd. your Favour of the 16th. The Speech of Pastoret I had before received by two Conveyances from France, from an old Acquaintance, whom I had not heard from, before for thirteen Years. The Applications from Dr. Hall, and General Miller as well as that of Col. Francis Nicholls mentioned in your Letter of the 12th, and those of Mr. Huger and Dr. Conover mentioned in your two Letters of...
I have received your Letters of Septr 14. 15. and 19th. The Letters inclosed in them, from Govr. Sinclair, Judge Patterson and Dr. James Sykes, I return to you inclosed with this, that you may be able to preserve together all the Papers, relative to the successor to Dr. Way in the Treasury of the Mint. Tomorrow I shall sett out on my Journey to the Southward, and shall Stop at East Chester...
Your favour of the 7th. and the duplicate of it, and that of the ninth, with their Enclosures, I received last night— Dr Rush has so many motives to wish that Congress may assemble in Philadelphia, that his Testimony must be weighed with certain Grains of allowance. It is but a small consolation to the Senators and Representatives of the United States to say that the malignant Contagion is but...
Your Favour of yesterday was brought to me to day at Dinner, a very pleasing Circumstance as it Shews the practicability of quick and frequent Intercourse between us.— The Chevalier de Yrujo’s Letter you mention, I shall probably have an Opportunity to See, as soon as I wish and therefore shall Say nothing to it at present.— I wish the Person, whoever he was, that undertook to publish your...
I have to thank you, for the Summary in your Letter of the 23d. of the dispaches from Mr Pinckney, Mr Murray, Mr Bulkley &c. Mr Murray arrived in Season to renew his old Friendship with his Predecessor. They had spent Some weeks together at the Hague, more than a dozen years ago. Mr Adams had an opportunity to introduce Mr Murray to his Friends and to communicate to him the train of Affairs,...
Your favors of the 30th of August and 8th of September have remained unacknowledged, because I had nothing to communicate that could compensate for the loss of a moment of your time; which I know is too much occupied in matters of business to be interrupted by unimportant letters. Having received the enclosed letter by the Ganges, in the twilight, and attending to the first part of the...
I received your favour of the 28th. Inclosed are Some Papers I received from the City of Washington. They are Duplicates of Such as I received Several Weeks ago. I have delayed an Answer because I was not Satisfied and wished to take Advice.—After you have examined them I wish for your Opinion, 1st. whether I ought to Sign the Warrant of Attorney without limitation of time. 2d. Whether the...
Since writing to you a few days ago, I have been favoured with your letters of the 26th and 30th Ulto. If you should have occasion to write to Mr Parish of Hamburg, you would oblige me, by thanking him in my behalf, for his very polite & friendly offer of sending me any thing I might have occasion for from that place. It would be more formal than necessary, to introduce Mr Bucknall’s...
At the sametime that I acknowledge the receipt of your favour of the 20th Ulto enclosing a translation of the Spanish letter and one from Mr King, let me beg the favour of you to forward those which go under cover with this, to their respective Addresses, along with your own if you should have occasion to write soon to our public characters abroad; or by the first conveyances if you should...
By some unaccountable delay the inclosed which came in a letter to me has been extremely postponed. I hope not injuriously for the interest of the party concerned. Do me the favour to acknowlege its receipt. Yrs. with esteem & regard ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. For background to this letter, see the Marquis de Fleury to H, May 28, 1796 ; Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to H, September...
Permit me to request your care of the enclosed letter to Mr Williams, our Consul at Hamburgh, in answer to a very polite & civil one informing me of the arrival of Genl Lafayette & family at that place. Allow me also to ask the favour of you to send me Colo. Monroe’s, & Mr Fauchet’s Pamphlets; and if you have leisure (not else) to let me know what the public sentiment respecting them, is. In...
The President of the United States, requests The Secretary of State, The Secretary of the Treasury The Secretary of War, and the Attorney General to take into their Consideration, the State of the Nation and its foreign Relations, especially with France. These indeed may be so connected with those as with England, Spain, Holland, and others, that perhaps the former cannot be well weighed...
The President of the U S. requests the Secy of State, the Secy of the treasury, the Secy of War and the Atty. general to take into consideration the state of the nation and its foreign relations especially with France. These indeed may be so connected with these, with England Spain Holland and others that perhaps the former cannot be well weighed without the other. If our Envoys extraordinary...
Your letters of the 20th & 27th Ulto have been duly received; and the Pamphlets, with Colo. Monroe’s View, came safe. If no direct opportunity to Alexandria should present itself soon, by which the W[or]ks of Mr Nancrede could be sent with convenience & without liability to damage, I would thank you for putting them (carefully wrapped up) into the hands of Colo. Biddle, who is the Agent...
I make no apology for offering you my opinion on the present state of our affairs. I look upon the Question before the Public as nothing less than whether we shall maintain our Independence and I am prepared to do it in every event and at every hazard. I am therefore of opinion that our Executive should come forth on this basis. I wish to see a temperate , but grave solemn and firm...
I understand that the Senate have called upon the President for papers. Nothing certainly can be more proper; and such is the universal opinion here. And it appears to me essential that so much, as possibly can, be communicated. Confidence will otherwise be wanting—and criticism will ensue which it will be difficult to repel. The observation is that Congress are called upon to discharge the...
I have this moment received your two favours of the 25th. I am delighted with their contents; but it is impossible for me to reply particularly to them so as to reach you tomorrow as you desire. I will therefore confine myself to one point. I am against going immediately into alliance with Great Britain. It is my opinion that her interest will ensure us her cooperation, to the extent of her...
Your obliging favour of the 11th instant, enclosing copies of the Instructions to, and Dispatches from the Envoys of the United States at Paris, was received with thankfulness, by the last Post. One would think that the measure of infamy was filled, and the profligacy of, & corruption in the system pursued by the French Directory, required no further disclosure of the principles by which it is...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to the Secretary of state [&] sends him Champlain’s travels which he recieved by the last post, the person whom he desired to search his library , could not, on his first [look], find Escarbot: but promised to examine again, before the next post. Th:J. knows that it is in the library, and therefore hopes it will be found. he is happy in this occasion of...
As McHenry will probably have left Philadelphia, before this reaches that place, I take the liberty to address the subject of it to you. I have received a letter from Capt Van Rensselaer, in which he informs me that he is a candidate for a Commission on board of our navy, and requests my recommendation of it. As a connexion of our family —I cannot refuse it as far as truth & propriety will...
Though I scarcely think it possible that the British Administration can have given the orders which accounts from various quarters attribute to them —yet the circumstance of these accounts coming from different quarters and the conduct of so correct a man as Capt Cochran make me apprehensive. I take the liberty to express to you my opinion that it is of the true policy as well as of the...
The Secretary of the Department of War being absent from the seat of government, I do hereby, in conformity with the Act of Congress passed the 8th: of May 1792, authorize you to perform the duties of his Office, during his Absence.— CSmH .
The President of the United States, requests the Secretary of State to give directions for preparing Letters to the Consul General, and all the other Consuls and Vice Consuls of the French republic, throughout the United States revoking their Exequaturs, and a proclamation announcing such revocation to the public—The proclamation to be published and the Letters expedited, as soon as the Law...
As I never get letters by the Mail until the morning after they arrive in Alexandria, and frequently not for several days, as I am not regular in sending thither, your favour of the 6th instant did not reach my hands until yesterday. Of the abilities, and fitness of the Gentleman you have named for a high command in the Provisional Army, I think as you do; and that his Services ought to be...