You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Hamilton, Alexander
  • Recipient

    • Pickering, Timothy
  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 1-23 of 23 sorted by author
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
You no doubt have seen my pamphlet respecting the conduct and character of President Adams. The press teems with replies, and I may finally think it expedient to publish a second time. In this case I shall reinforce my charges by new anecdotes. My friends will no doubt be disposed to aid me. You probably possess some which are unknown to me. Pray let me have them without delay. You will...
I perceive that you as well as McHenry are quitting the Administration. I am not informed how all this has been, though I conjecture. Allow me to suggest, that you ought to take with you copies and extracts of all such documents as will enable you to explain both Jefferson & Adams . You are aware of a very curious journal of the latter when he was in Europe, a tissue of weakness and vanity....
The bearer of this, Mr. DuPont, formerly Consul at Charles Town, is personally known to you. He comes with the rest of his family to establish themselves in the United States. They are desirous of being favourably viewed by our Government and my intervention for this purpose has been requested. Inclosed is a letter from General Pinckney which speaks for itself. All that has come to my...
As I imagine you are acquainted with the Inhabitants of Wilkesburgh or Wilksborough in Pensylvania & the neighbouring Country, I take the liberty to request information of some trusty, intelligent, active young lawyer in that quarter to be entrusted with the management of some land concerns of importance in which my Brother in law Mr Church is interested. You will of course suppose that in...
On my return here I found your letter of the 29th . The sitting of a Court of Chancery and important business there have unavoidably delayed a reply. Now, it must be much more cursory than I could wish. As to the mission, in some shape or other, the more I have reflected upon it, the more has it appeared to me indispensable. To accomplish, with certainty, a principal object of it—the silencing...
I make no apology for offering you my opinion on the present state of our affairs. I look upon the Question before the Public as nothing less than whether we shall maintain our Independence and I am prepared to do it in every event and at every hazard. I am therefore of opinion that our Executive should come forth on this basis. I wish to see a temperate , but grave solemn and firm...
I understand that the Senate have called upon the President for papers. Nothing certainly can be more proper; and such is the universal opinion here. And it appears to me essential that so much, as possibly can, be communicated. Confidence will otherwise be wanting—and criticism will ensue which it will be difficult to repel. The observation is that Congress are called upon to discharge the...
I send you the paragraph of a News Paper just published. I hope it is an Electioneering lie—but as it is likely to do mischief I will thank you by return of Post to inform me whether you have any thing to confirm or refute & particularly whether you have heared of the list with which Commodore Truxton’s name is connected. Yrs. truly ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. The enclosure...
I observe by the Boston papers, that some dispatches have been lately found on board a vessel from this port which was carried into Gibralter. The late consul here, Mr. Rosier, has just been with me and suggested that the dispatches are probably from him and allude (but without naming me) to some conversations with me relating to his being received as Consul General some time last Winter....
I am this moment favoured with your letter of the 9th instant. I shall immediately reflect on the most important point & tomorrow give you the result. The provision in the law is ample. But in this My Dear Sir, as in every thing else we must unite caution with decision. The UStates must not be committed on the Independence of St Domingo—no guarantee no formal treaty—nothing that can rise up in...
The post of yesterday brought me your letter of the day before. I regret that the idea of a Commission extraordinary appears of doubtful propriety. For after very mature reflection I am intirely convinced of its expediency. I do not understand the passage you cite as excluding the reception of a special extraordinary Minister but of an ordinary resident Minister. It seems impossible that the...
Your friendly letters of the 21. 22 & 23 of August have been duly received. I feel myself at once much flattered and truly indebted for the very favourable opinion of me which you manifest. The good estimation of men of sense and virtue is an ample consolation for the censure & malice of those of a different character. While the expression of your sentiments has all the value which a well...
The multiplicity of my avocations joined to imperfect health has delayed the communication you desired respecting St Domingo. And what is worse it has prevented my bestowing sufficient thought to offer at present any thing worth having. No regular system of Liberty will at present suit St Domingo. The Government if independent must be military—partaking of the feodal system. A hereditary Chief...
As McHenry will probably have left Philadelphia, before this reaches that place, I take the liberty to address the subject of it to you. I have received a letter from Capt Van Rensselaer, in which he informs me that he is a candidate for a Commission on board of our navy, and requests my recommendation of it. As a connexion of our family —I cannot refuse it as far as truth & propriety will...
Though I scarcely think it possible that the British Administration can have given the orders which accounts from various quarters attribute to them —yet the circumstance of these accounts coming from different quarters and the conduct of so correct a man as Capt Cochran make me apprehensive. I take the liberty to express to you my opinion that it is of the true policy as well as of the...
I thank you for your friendly letter by the Post. I had contemplated the possibility that Knox might come into service & was content to be second to him, if thought indispensable. Pinckney , if placed over me puts me a grade lower. I dont believe it to be necessary. I am far from certain that he will not be content to serve under me—but I am willing that the affair should be so managed as that...
Sometime since I received the inclosed being directions concerning measures requisite to be pursued to obtain indemnification in cases of Captures by British Cruisers. I laid it by in haste & have since overlooked it. I do not recollect to have seen it in the news papers & yet it appeared to me necessary that it should be so. As it came to me from some one of our public characters in London, I...
I have received your letter of the 30th. with the statement inclosed. I do not believe that its publication would have any influence upon the question of a rupture with France; but yet, as it seems that those who surround the President are not agreed in the matter—as an opinion is industriously circulated that too much fuel has been added by the publications of the Government—as it is...
Mr. Goodhue takes on with him a Boston paper, the printer of which states that he has obtained by a Ship just arrived, a London Paper of March 24th; mentionning in positive terms an account just received from the Emperor that in consequence of a combination between Prussia & France he is driven to the necessity of making an immediate peace for the safety of the Empire —that in consequence of...
[ New York, June 13, 1799. On June 18, 1799, Pickering wrote to Hamilton and referred to “your letter of the 13th.” Letter not found. ]
I have this moment received your two favours of the 25th. I am delighted with their contents; but it is impossible for me to reply particularly to them so as to reach you tomorrow as you desire. I will therefore confine myself to one point. I am against going immediately into alliance with Great Britain. It is my opinion that her interest will ensure us her cooperation, to the extent of her...
By some unaccountable delay the inclosed which came in a letter to me has been extremely postponed. I hope not injuriously for the interest of the party concerned. Do me the favour to acknowlege its receipt. Yrs. with esteem & regard ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. For background to this letter, see the Marquis de Fleury to H, May 28, 1796 ; Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to H, September...
It is now ascertained that Mr Pinckney has been refused and with circumstances of indignity. What is to be done? The share I have had in the public administration added to my interest as a Citizen make me extremely anxious that at this delicate Crisis a course of conduct exactly proper may be adopted. I offer to your consideration without ceremony what appears to me such a course. First. I...