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As Mr. Alston is already known to you no introduction or recommendation from me can be requisite. I have great pleasure however in expressing the high opinion which I entertain of his character and his talents. He is justly considered as a great acquisition to the Cause of republicanism. I had not the pleasure to see your friend Talliafero. The letter which you did me the favor to write in his...
I wrote you last on the 24th. since which yours of the 20th. is recieved. I must begin by correcting two errors in my last. It was false arithmetic to say that two measures therein mentioned to be carried by majorities of 11. would have failed if the 14. absentees (wherein a majority of 6. was ours) had been present. 6 coming over from the other side would have turned the scale, and this was...
Letter not found. 10 July 1797. Mentioned in JM to Jefferson, 2 Aug. 1797 . Informs JM that James Monroe should be in Virginia within two weeks.
I was informed on my arrival here that Genl. Pinckney’s dispatches had on their first receipt excited in the administration a great deal of passion: that councils were held from day to day, and their ill temper fixed at length in war; that under this impression Congress was called: that the tone of the party in general became high, and so continued till the news of the failure of the bank of...
I was taken on the road & have been confind by a Cold & inflammatory fever ever since which prevented my going to Balto. I have writen on yesterday to get Notes discounted, (even by shaving if necessary) & shall certainly I expect forward you 400$ before the Assembly rises. I shall lose no time after I get it—altho’ I have been dissapointed in the rect. of Money for Articles sold for Cash at...
Mr. Ogilvie, intending Soon to pass thro yr Part of the Country, is desirous of the acquaintance of a Person, whose Character he respects as much as yours—it is with pleasure I facilitate his wishes by this Introduction—he is a most ardent Lover of Science and republicanism, and is most assiduously employed in imparting the Principles of both to a respectable & increasing School of promising...
the inclosed was sealed before I recollected that I have mentioned a petition instead of an address to the President, which is to be corrected. a nomination of Govr. Secretary & three judges to the Missisipi territory is sent in to the Senate , four of whom are agents, or interested in the land speculations of that country, two of them bankrupt speculators, & the 5th. unknown. the Senate...
I omitted in my letter of the 23d to say any thing on the subject of mr Wirt; which however was necessary only for form’s sake, because I had promised it. you know he is a candidate for the clerkship of your house, you know his talents, his worth, & his republicanism; & therefore need not my testimony, which could otherwise be given for him in the strongest form on every point. the desirable...
I wrote you last on the 8th. We have still not a word from our envoys. This long silence (if they have been silent) proves things are not going on very roughly. If they have not been silent, it proves their information if made public would check the disposition to arm. I had flattered myself, from the progress of the public sentiment against arming, that the same progress had taken place in...
I was charged by Mr. Charles Pinckney of South Carolina, with a message to you that entirely escaped my memory when I had the pleasure of seeing you; he begs that you will write to Colo. W. Hampton, and urge him to exert himself to secure the vote of S. Carolina to Mr. Jefferson, (if they vote for Genl. Pinckney, they had as well not vote for Mr. Jefferson). Mr. Pinckney so frequently...
I wrote you last on the 22d. since which I have received yours without date, but probably of about the 18th. or 19th. An arrival to the Eastward brings us some news which you will see detailed in the papers. The new partition of Europe is sketched, but how far authentic we know not. It has some probability in it’s form. The French appear busy in their preparations for the invasion of England:...
Your favour of the 13th. ulto. came duly to hand. A constant attendance in our General Court, has hitherto prevented me from acknowledging the receipt of it. I never had an Idea of undertaking a formal explanation or defence of the letter to Mazzei, imputed to Mr. Jefferson. As he has thought proper to be silent about it, it would be improper, perhaps indelicate, for any of his friends to...
I am favor’d with Yours of the 31 Jany. ⅌ Post Inclosing a Letter for Colo. Mercer which I reced. this day, and have delivered it Him, He having come to Town last Evening. Your Draught in Favor of Messrs. Vass & Dunbar at 15 Days sight I refuse[d] to Accept for want of Advise. A few Days after I recd. a Letter from Colo. Mercer of the Draft, I then waited on Mr. Jolly the Gentn. who presented...
Majr Welch’s starting sooner than I expected I have only time to inclose you a letter from Colo. Geo. Nicholas, to Colo. C. M. Thrusten, in answer to one written to B. Thrusten, who was desired to shew it to Colo. Nicholas. It is universally approved of in this state. You no doubt have seen the Resolutions passed by our assembly, there were only 3 descenting to one, 2 to another & only one to...
I have lately learnt that their is a Probability that the office of Marshal for this state will in a Short time be made vacant, and some of my friends have induced me by Persuasion, to apply for it. This has induced me to mention the circumstance to you and if you think my abilitys and fidelity intituled to it will feel under many Obligations to you for your attention. I have deemed it...
With this you will recieve the IVd. nails desired in your memorandum, that is to say 25. ℔ weighing about 2½ ℔ to the M̶. Probably they yield something more than a thousand to that weight, not being so uniform as they ought to be. We are now working up some remnants of hoops of different breadths till the arrival of a supply of proper size from Philadelphia. They are 1/3 pr. ℔. consequently...
In answer to your favour of the 25th Aug: permit me to address to you a copy of a circular letter which I have prepared to answer such inquiries as you have been good enough to make in the name of your friend. The young gentlemen from the Southward are chiefly culpable in the expences of clothing & horses. I am happy to hear of your health—but should be more pleased if the circumstances of our...
I have never answered your letter by mr Polk , because I intended to have paid you a visit. this has been postponed by various circumstances till yesterday, being the day fixed for the departure of my daur Eppes, my horses were ready for me to have set out to see you. an accident postponed her departure to this day & my visit also. but Colo. Monroe dined with us yesterday, and on my asking his...
Yours of the 10th. inst. is recieved. I expected mine of the 14th. would have been my last from hence, as I had proposed to have set out on the 20th. but in the morning of the 19th. we heard of the arrival of Marshall at New York, and I concluded to stay & see whether that circumstance would produce any new projects. no doubt he there recieved more than hints from Hamilton as to the tone...
Yours of the 12th. is recieved. I wrote you last on the 15th. but the letter getting misplaced, will only go by this post. We still hear nothing from our Envoys. Whether the Executive hear we know not. But if war were to be apprehended, it is impossible our envoys should not find means of putting us on our guard, or that the Executive should hold back their information. No news therefore is...
Mr Macons return to Orange affords me an opportunity of mentioning to you a subject, in which I cannot but feel an interest. Since the assembly rose the executive have appointed me to the office of Attorney General. My acquaintance in the country is not extensive and I must depend upon my friends making my pretensions known to the members of the legislature. If it is compatible with your ideas...
I have yours of the 23d. ulto. by Fredbg. We had hear⟨d⟩ of yr. indisposition and inferrd from yr. not mentioning ⟨it⟩ it had been slight, and were happy to learn from Mr. Maco⟨n⟩ that altho’ it was more serious than we supposed, you h⟨ad⟩ recovered entirely yr. health. Every ⟨an⟩ticipati⟨on⟩ of th⟨e⟩ views of the admn. in this State seems to have been verified, or so many facts established as...
The H. of R. has been in conclave ever since 2. oclock yesterday. At 10. P.M. 17 ballots had been tried, & were invariably 8. 6. & 2 divided. I have not heard from the Capitol this morning. I can venture nothing more by the post but my affectionate salutations, to yourself & mrs. Madison. P. S. 1. P.M. The H. of R. suspended the balloting from 7. to 12. this morning, & after trying a few more...
Although My Acquaintance with you is a Very Small [one] I have taken the liberty To Address you. In Porcupines Paper of 27h. & 28h Decmber is a piece under the Signature (of a True federalist Though a Virginian) Dated the 10h. of December Implicating a Number of My frends Incoludeing you and myself in a Very Scurillious Manner. As I am Not a Publick Speaker on Politicks and Persueing the...
Believing, as I do, that you know my conduct and exertions in the cause of truth and liberty , to have been pure, uniform, disinterested and decissive, on all occassions, and in all situations, I take the liberty to sollicit your countenance, and protection, should an opportunity intervene, whereby you could introduce my name to Mr. Jefferson. On my arrival from Europe in 1778, I had the...
I wrote you last on the 31st. since which yours of the 27th. of May is received. The alien bill, when we had nearly got through it, on the 2d. reading, (on a report from the commee. of the whole) was referred to a special committee, by a vote of it’s friends (12) against 11. who thought it could be rejected on the question for the 3d reading. It is reported again, very much softened, and if...
On the 20th. Inst. I forwarded by the Schooner Elizabeth, James Allen Master, 20 Cases of Madeira Wine containing in all 22 Dozn.—put up with great Care. As I had mislaid your Letter of Directions I was forced to address these Cases to a Mr. Wm Wilson with orders to hold them at your Disposal which I hope may prove of no Inconvenience. This Gentleman is Said to be a respectable Man at...
This will be handed you by mr. Erwin, a gentleman of Boston, with whom I became acquainted last winter on a letter of introduction from old Saml. Adams. He is sensible, well informed & strongly republican, wealthy & well allied in his own state & in England. He calls to pay his respects to you. I inclose you two letters which the Govr. sent me by him for perusal. It is a pity that a part of...
I left Philaa. on the 1st. & arrivd here on the 5. In the morning I shall go to Richmond for a few days to arrange some private matters. The result of the enquiries of the committee has been more favourable than I expected, and will be a bitter pill to the British minister, our Secretary of state & their faction. We have deemd it proper not to make our proceedings public, untill laid before...
Not hearing from you at the District Court respecting the Bills in Chancery I delivered from my Neighbours Colo. Taylor & Mjr. Croghan, have sent the Bearer to bring any commands you may favor them with by me. I think I mentioned to you the wish of Colo. Taylor for you to correct any impropriety in the Bills & return them with the Answers, as from that circumstance they have not yet been...
Soon after my arrival here, I recd. your favour with several inclosures. The inclosed Letters were delivered, as directed, and I should have acknowledged the receipt of your Letter at an earlier period—but for an indisposition which has kept me very much confined during the whole Winter. As the Weather becomes more mild, and the Climate more like that to which I have been accustomed—my health...
The moment no doubt is approaching, when we have reason to expect a change in Administration—under the present, I can never obtain a favor, my political opinions & sentiments are too well understood, to promise any thing, unless they are relinquished which never can be—but the period I hope is not far distant when Republicans will have the Government of this Country in their hands, & the idea...
I recd your Favr. enclosing Mr Patton’s Letter, and am greatly obliged for your Kindness in making those necessary Inquiries respecting the Land. The Sum demanded is beyond my Means. I could not, in my Purchase exceed 2000 £ for the Land alone; the other necessary Expences informing a Settlement would be considerable, & must be attended to as well as the Land. Mr Geo. C. Taylor has written to...
I wrote you two days since by my servant who was to put the letter in the post office at charlottesville. This will be presented by Mr. Ervin a young man of merit from Boston. I saw him in Paris, but on some ground wh. I forget refused him my passport, in consequence whereof we did not become acquaint⟨ed. He pub⟩lished my book in Engld., of which he sent me a copy. Last winter he was...
By the mail on Thursday I recievd your favour of the Int. On the 12 of the last month we sent a messenger to Tennessee for some persons & papers, & have good reason to conclude that we shall get some material testimony from that quarter. For his return I wait, & shall on it set out for Virginia, if I can escape the fever which is pretty prevalent here, notwithstanding the heavy rains which we...
If any information it may be in my power to furnish you or any services I can render you here, should be deemed by you a sufficient equivalent, I shall be happy in future in being numbered among your correspondents. The present moment however affords nothing interesting. The fate of Mr Nicholas’s motion for disbanding the additional army, you will have seen in the newspapers. As also the...
Letter not found. 12 September 1797. Calendared as a three-page letter in the lists probably made by Peter Force (DLC, series 7, container 2); however, no correspondence has been located between JM and Charles Louis, baron de Montesquieu (1749–1824), grandson of the famous French philosopher.
This will find you on your farm & I hope with restord health. According to practice we have had a bankrupt law before us for many days. The final question on it is pospond untill tuesday week, & the fate of it uncertain —tho I much fear that it will pass—you well know what they can do by time—there was a majority of 20 agt it when introducd. You observe by the papers that there is a small...
I Will Be obliged to you to favour me with an answer to my last, (if recieved) on the subject of the absolute necessity of your State Legislature passing at their next session an act to declare that the Electors of a President & Vice President shall be elected by joint Ballott by your State Legislature in the manner it is done in this State—this act must Be passed at your next session or it...
I wrote you last on the 7th. since which yours of the 3d. is recieved. Your next (which I shall still be here to recieve) will probably acknolege mine of May 31. and will perhaps be your last as you would see by mine of the 7th. that I should leave this on the 20th. which I still purpose. The new citizen or naturalization bill is past the Senate also. It requires 14. years residence to make a...
I wrote you last on the 15th. since that yours of the 12th. is recieved. since that too a great change has taken place in the appearance of our political atmosphere. the merchants, as before, continue, a respectable part of them, to wish to avoid arming. the French decree operated on them as a sedative, producing more alarm than resentment. on the Representatives differently. it excited...
I now send by Bp. Madison the balance which should have gone from our last court by mr Barber: but not seeing him the first day of the court, & that breaking up on the first day contrary to usage & universal expectation, mr Barber was gone before I knew that fact.—is it not strange the public should have no information of the proceedings & prospects of our envoys in a case so vitally...
I wrote you last on the 15th. Since that, yours of the 12th. is recieved. Since that too a great change has taken place in the appearance of our political atmosphere. The merchants, as before, continue, a respectable part of them, to wish to avoid arming. The French decree operated on them as a sedative, producing more alarm than resentment. On the Representatives differently. It excited...
I have recievd your favour of the 26th. ultimo, & now enclose you an insurance & a letter for Mrs. Madison, to whom I beg you to present me with much respect. You have seen that on the 19th. of the last month the president sent to us a message, & that in consequence of a request from our house his instructions, & all the despatches from our commissioners were sent to us confidentially —for...
I returned from Richmond yesterday (wednesday) and found my child better than when I left him. The dangerous simptoms of the thrush seem to be past, and the hooping cough has nearly left him, so that extreme debility, is his present chief complaint. Perhaps I do wrong in sending you the enclosed letter, in reference to the veiws of the author, but as I know no harm can come of it, especially...
The forgery lately attempted to be plaid off by mr. H. on the house of representatives, of a pretended memorial presented by Logan to the French government, has been so palpably exposed as to have thrown ridicule on the whole of the clamours they endeavored to raise as to that transaction. Still however their majority will pass the bill. The real views in the importance they have given to...
Being on a visit to this place I avail myself of the post wh. goes to morrow yr. way to congratulate you on the issue of the presidential election. The want of arrangment in the commenc’ment, subjected the result to much incertainty & embarrassment, but happily it is at an end, and it is probable the circumstances attending the crisis may prove useful. I left Richmond on tuesday & sit out in...
I wrote you last on the 30th. Jan. since which yours of the 25th. is recieved. at the date of my letter I had only heard the bill for the eventual army read once. I concieved it additional to the Provisional army &c. I must correct the error. the bill for the Provisional army (about 10,000. men) expires this session without having been carried into execution. the eventual army (about 30,000)...
So much of the communications from our envoys has got abroad, & so partially that there can now be no ground for reconsideration with the Senate. I may therefore consistently with duty do what every member of the body is doing. still I would rather you would use the communication with reserve till you see the whole papers. the first impressions from them are very disagreeable & confused....
I was yesterday at Monticello when Mr. Jefferson informed me he proposed sitting out on the next (this) morning on a visit to you, to remain a day & return. Considering yr. present publick engagment, the business before the legislature & the part you will necessarily take in it, with his publick station, I was immediately impressed with an idea the trip had better be declined & so observed. He...