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After a session of somewhat more than eight months, congress adjourned on Monday last, to meet on the first Monday in December. The senate was detained on Executive business; and have adjourned to day. Many laws have been past, a list of which I enclose to you, and send a copy of those which are printed to your court for the use of the county—Some of these are highly important, and claim your...
Mrs. Madison’s letter has been deliverd, & I have paid Bache ten dollars agreeably to your request, & enclose you his reciept. On yesterday we limited the land tax to one year, which I do expect will defeat the provisional army bill now under discussion—it is now discoverd, that the eastern members, who so readily run into heavy expences, are alarmd when the[y] come to make provision for the...
I have recievd your favour, & deliverd Mrs. Madisons. The accompanying papers will shew you the state of Europe, & you can easily judge of the effect they have had here. We have voted out the propositions for a salt tax, & for an additional regiment of artillerists—& the Senate, to day, that for a provisional army—they have also confirmd the nomination of Gerry in the place of Dana, who...
The republic is safe. Our ticket has succeeded in the city of N. York by a majority of about four hundred—Burr is in for Orange—accounts from other parts of that state are equally favourable—we may count on a majority of thirty in their legislature; & there is good ground to believe the N. Jersey will exhibit the same spirit which her neighbour has done, nor do I think that the Senate of this...
I wrote to you by the last mail, & now enclose a letter entrusted to my care for Mrs. Madison. On saturday we passed a bill, which came from the Senate, for the protection of our commerce, after disrobing it of the clauses, which authorisd the president to purchase nine additional vessels of 20 guns each, & directing that the three frigates shoud not be used as convoys—& that the law shoud be...
I have recievd your letter, & enclosures by Mr. Jefferson, to all of which I shall pay particular attention. By the public papers you will observe the number of members who have been absent—this circumstance has prevented our attempting any thing of consequence—however many of them have lately come in, & we have reason to expect others in a few days, when we shall make an effort for the repeal...
Your favour of the 13th. ulto. came duly to hand. A constant attendance in our General Court, has hitherto prevented me from acknowledging the receipt of it. I never had an Idea of undertaking a formal explanation or defence of the letter to Mazzei, imputed to Mr. Jefferson. As he has thought proper to be silent about it, it would be improper, perhaps indelicate, for any of his friends to...
The result of our elections for the State legislature being known, it is with great pleasure that I inform you of our success. It has exceeded our most sanguine expectations. Of 80 members who compose the House of Delegates 47 are decidedly opposed to a legislative choice of Electors. Therefore an alteration of the present mode of election by the people will not be attempted. The consequence...
The subject of the approaching election of president & Vice-president induces me to address a few lines to you. It begins to engage the attention of the people. In this district, Mr. J. T. Chase & myself are the Candidates. The Governmental party has selected the most popular man on their side, and every exertion will be made to obtain success. I cannot say with any certainty what the result...
I am favor’d with Yours of the 31 Jany. ⅌ Post Inclosing a Letter for Colo. Mercer which I reced. this day, and have delivered it Him, He having come to Town last Evening. Your Draught in Favor of Messrs. Vass & Dunbar at 15 Days sight I refuse[d] to Accept for want of Advise. A few Days after I recd. a Letter from Colo. Mercer of the Draft, I then waited on Mr. Jolly the Gentn. who presented...
Believing, as I do, that you know my conduct and exertions in the cause of truth and liberty , to have been pure, uniform, disinterested and decissive, on all occassions, and in all situations, I take the liberty to sollicit your countenance, and protection, should an opportunity intervene, whereby you could introduce my name to Mr. Jefferson. On my arrival from Europe in 1778, I had the...
I have just returned from Albany where I had the supreme pleasure of giving my voice for 12 electors who will unequivocally give 12 Votes for our Jefferson. I am now favored with your very obliging letter of 24th Ulto. which has removed many fears and jealousies with which my mind was much agitated, it is an important moment, a solemn crisis on which our political salvation essentially if not...
The extreme anxiety we feel on account of the approaching election must be my apology (if any is necessary) for writing to you on the important subject, can we, may we rely on the integrity of the southern States? We have lately had some reports that have alarmed us from Tennessee, will you let me know how many votes we may certainly calculate upon for Messrs. Jefferson & Burr? We depend on...
Altho from our differnt avocations we are not in the habit of corresponding I shall use the freedom of asking you to do me a favor which from its nature, is only just. Mr. Francis Taylor, who was the deputy of Major Wm. Lyndsay “late collector of the Port Norforlk [ sic ] for many years past” offers himself as a candidite for that Office, in rotation . The Government will pay Much Attention to...
I have lately seen in a Richmond paper Zakh Burnleys advertisement of 1600 acres of Land in your County seven miles above the Court house. I am disposed to become a purchaser of some good Land in that part of the State. Can I get the favor of you to let me know the price & your opinion of its real value? If you think the purchase adviseable I will if possible see it on my way to Philada....
The inclosed proceedings upon the claim of Doctr. Inglis before the board of Commissioners under the 6th. article of the treaty of amity &c. between Great Britain & the United States, exhibit the causes of dissension between the commissioners of the two nations. It is made public “ with a view to general information ,” and will, I doubt not, afford you much satisfaction in the perusal,...
I recd your favour of the 14th ultimo and have noted the contents thereoff. I have no Doubt but you have been well informed how the House of Represintatives have acted on all occasions as will [ sic ] as the presendent of the U S. I will take the liberty to inclose you a Circular letter that I have wrote to my Constituents in which you will see the most prominent faters [ sic ] of the feds. I...
I have directed some Letters to my son John, to the post office in Orange County. If he should not be there will you be so obliging as to inclose them back to me at this place, where I expect to be untill the third of March next. Congress progresses very slow in business and I expect they will continue so till this Day week, and then too if no President is chosing. I have no Doubt but very...
I have taken the liberty to inclose a Letter to Miss Polly Paine —your attention to it will confer a singular honor on me. I am happy to hear that you have suffered yourself to be elected a representative in the State Legislature for Orange County. Republicanism is gaining ground very fast in this District. My Father is elected to Congress in the room of Mr Macher by a Majority of 204 Votes;...
The friends of republicanism have to congratulate each other upon the auspicious appearance of political events. It is reduced to a certainty as far as human foresight can predict that both Houses of the Pennsylvania Legislature will be republican after the October Elections. I conversed last Week with a Monsieur Savary de Valcoulon intimate friend & copartner with Mr Gallatin who says that he...
I wrote you last on the 24th. since which yours of the 20th. is recieved. I must begin by correcting two errors in my last. It was false arithmetic to say that two measures therein mentioned to be carried by majorities of 11. would have failed if the 14. absentees (wherein a majority of 6. was ours) had been present. 6 coming over from the other side would have turned the scale, and this was...
I was informed on my arrival here that Genl. Pinckney’s dispatches had on their first receipt excited in the administration a great deal of passion: that councils were held from day to day, and their ill temper fixed at length in war; that under this impression Congress was called: that the tone of the party in general became high, and so continued till the news of the failure of the bank of...
the inclosed was sealed before I recollected that I have mentioned a petition instead of an address to the President, which is to be corrected. a nomination of Govr. Secretary & three judges to the Missisipi territory is sent in to the Senate , four of whom are agents, or interested in the land speculations of that country, two of them bankrupt speculators, & the 5th. unknown. the Senate...
I omitted in my letter of the 23d to say any thing on the subject of mr Wirt; which however was necessary only for form’s sake, because I had promised it. you know he is a candidate for the clerkship of your house, you know his talents, his worth, & his republicanism; & therefore need not my testimony, which could otherwise be given for him in the strongest form on every point. the desirable...
I wrote you last on the 8th. We have still not a word from our envoys. This long silence (if they have been silent) proves things are not going on very roughly. If they have not been silent, it proves their information if made public would check the disposition to arm. I had flattered myself, from the progress of the public sentiment against arming, that the same progress had taken place in...
I wrote you last on the 22d. since which I have received yours without date, but probably of about the 18th. or 19th. An arrival to the Eastward brings us some news which you will see detailed in the papers. The new partition of Europe is sketched, but how far authentic we know not. It has some probability in it’s form. The French appear busy in their preparations for the invasion of England:...
With this you will recieve the IVd. nails desired in your memorandum, that is to say 25. ℔ weighing about 2½ ℔ to the M̶. Probably they yield something more than a thousand to that weight, not being so uniform as they ought to be. We are now working up some remnants of hoops of different breadths till the arrival of a supply of proper size from Philadelphia. They are 1/3 pr. ℔. consequently...
I have never answered your letter by mr Polk , because I intended to have paid you a visit. this has been postponed by various circumstances till yesterday, being the day fixed for the departure of my daur Eppes, my horses were ready for me to have set out to see you. an accident postponed her departure to this day & my visit also. but Colo. Monroe dined with us yesterday, and on my asking his...
Yours of the 10th. inst. is recieved. I expected mine of the 14th. would have been my last from hence, as I had proposed to have set out on the 20th. but in the morning of the 19th. we heard of the arrival of Marshall at New York, and I concluded to stay & see whether that circumstance would produce any new projects. no doubt he there recieved more than hints from Hamilton as to the tone...
Yours of the 12th. is recieved. I wrote you last on the 15th. but the letter getting misplaced, will only go by this post. We still hear nothing from our Envoys. Whether the Executive hear we know not. But if war were to be apprehended, it is impossible our envoys should not find means of putting us on our guard, or that the Executive should hold back their information. No news therefore is...
The H. of R. has been in conclave ever since 2. oclock yesterday. At 10. P.M. 17 ballots had been tried, & were invariably 8. 6. & 2 divided. I have not heard from the Capitol this morning. I can venture nothing more by the post but my affectionate salutations, to yourself & mrs. Madison. P. S. 1. P.M. The H. of R. suspended the balloting from 7. to 12. this morning, & after trying a few more...
I wrote you last on the 31st. since which yours of the 27th. of May is received. The alien bill, when we had nearly got through it, on the 2d. reading, (on a report from the commee. of the whole) was referred to a special committee, by a vote of it’s friends (12) against 11. who thought it could be rejected on the question for the 3d reading. It is reported again, very much softened, and if...
This will be handed you by mr. Erwin, a gentleman of Boston, with whom I became acquainted last winter on a letter of introduction from old Saml. Adams. He is sensible, well informed & strongly republican, wealthy & well allied in his own state & in England. He calls to pay his respects to you. I inclose you two letters which the Govr. sent me by him for perusal. It is a pity that a part of...
I wrote you last on the 7th. since which yours of the 3d. is recieved. Your next (which I shall still be here to recieve) will probably acknolege mine of May 31. and will perhaps be your last as you would see by mine of the 7th. that I should leave this on the 20th. which I still purpose. The new citizen or naturalization bill is past the Senate also. It requires 14. years residence to make a...
I wrote you last on the 15th. since that yours of the 12th. is recieved. since that too a great change has taken place in the appearance of our political atmosphere. the merchants, as before, continue, a respectable part of them, to wish to avoid arming. the French decree operated on them as a sedative, producing more alarm than resentment. on the Representatives differently. it excited...
I now send by Bp. Madison the balance which should have gone from our last court by mr Barber: but not seeing him the first day of the court, & that breaking up on the first day contrary to usage & universal expectation, mr Barber was gone before I knew that fact.—is it not strange the public should have no information of the proceedings & prospects of our envoys in a case so vitally...
I wrote you last on the 15th. Since that, yours of the 12th. is recieved. Since that too a great change has taken place in the appearance of our political atmosphere. The merchants, as before, continue, a respectable part of them, to wish to avoid arming. The French decree operated on them as a sedative, producing more alarm than resentment. On the Representatives differently. It excited...
The forgery lately attempted to be plaid off by mr. H. on the house of representatives, of a pretended memorial presented by Logan to the French government, has been so palpably exposed as to have thrown ridicule on the whole of the clamours they endeavored to raise as to that transaction. Still however their majority will pass the bill. The real views in the importance they have given to...
I wrote you last on the 30th. Jan. since which yours of the 25th. is recieved. at the date of my letter I had only heard the bill for the eventual army read once. I concieved it additional to the Provisional army &c. I must correct the error. the bill for the Provisional army (about 10,000. men) expires this session without having been carried into execution. the eventual army (about 30,000)...
So much of the communications from our envoys has got abroad, & so partially that there can now be no ground for reconsideration with the Senate. I may therefore consistently with duty do what every member of the body is doing. still I would rather you would use the communication with reserve till you see the whole papers. the first impressions from them are very disagreeable & confused....
Yours of the 10th. inst. is recieved. I expected mine of the 14th. would have been my last from hence, as I had proposed to have set out on the 20th. But in the morning of the 19th. we heard of the arrival of Marshall at New York, and I concluded to stay & see whether that circumstance would produce any new projects. No doubt he there recieved more than hints from Hamilton as to the tone...
I wrote you last on the 21st. Your’s of the 12th. therein acknoleged is the last recd. The measure I suggested in mine of adjourning for consultation with their constituents was not brought forward; but on Tuesday 3. resolutions were moved which you will see in the public papers. They were offered in committee to prevent their being suppressed by the previous question, & in the commee. on the...
So much of the communications from our envoys has got abroad, & so partially that there can now be no ground for reconsideration with the Senate. I may therefore consistently with duty do what every member of the body is doing. Still I would rather you would use the communication with reserve till you see the whole papers. The first impressions from them are very disagreeable & confused....
My last to you was of the 16th. since which yours of the 12th. is recieved and it’s contents disposed of properly. these met such approbation as to have occasioned an extraordinary impression of that day’s paper. Logan’s bill is passed. the lower house, by a majority of 20. passed yesterday a bill continuing the suspension of intercourse with France, with a new clause enabling the President to...
I wrote you last on the 22d. since which I have received yours without date, but probably of about the 18th. or 19th. an arrival to the Eastward brings us some news which you will see detailed in the papers. the new partition of Europe is sketched, but how far authentic we know not. it has some probability in it’s form. the French appear busy in their preparations for the invasion of England:...
I have suffered the post hour to come so nearly over on me that I must huddle over what I have more than appears in the public papers. I arrived here on Christmas day, not a single bill or other article of business having yet been brought into Senate. the P’s speech, so unlike himself in point of moderation, is supposed to have been written by the military conclave , & particularly Hamilton....
I omitted in my letter of the 23d. to say any thing on the subject of mr. Wirt; which however was necessary only for form’s sake, because I had promised it. You know he is a candidate for the clerkship of your house, you know his talents, his worth, & his republicanism; & therefore need not my testimony, which could otherwise be given for him in the strongest form on every point. The desirable...
My last to you was of the 19th. it acknoleged yours of the 8th. in mine I informed you of the nomination of Murray. there is evidence that the letter of Taleyrand was known to one of the Secretaries, therefore probably to all: the nomination however is declared by one of them to have been kept secret from them all. he added that he was glad of it, as, had they been consulted, the advice would...
I wrote you two letters on the 5th. inst. since which I have recd yours of the 2d. I send you, in a separate package, the instructions to our envoys & their communications. You will find that my representation of their contents, from memory, was substantially just. The public mind appears still in a state of astonishment. There never was a moment in which the aid of an able pen was so...
Notwithstanding the suspected infidelity of the post, I must hazard this communication. The Minority in the H. of R. after seeing the impossibility of electing B. the certainty that a legislative usurpation would be resisted by arms, and a recourse to a Convention to reorganise & amend the government, held a consultation on this dilemma. Whether it would be better for them to come over in a...