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I am vexed My Dear Betsey that the blunder of a servant prevented the inclosed from going by the Post of yesterday. I am well aware how much in my absence your affectionate and anxious heart needs the consolation of frequently hearing from me; and there is no consolation which I am not very much disposed to administer to it. It deserves every thing from me. I am much more in debt to you than I...
I yesterday informed my beloved of my arrival here. A very good night’s rest has put me in as pleasant a state as I can be when absent from my dear and excellent Eliza. But the pressure of my engagements obliges me to confine myself to the information that I am in good health; which I am glad to know is of more importance than any thing else I could say. Kiss all my Children for me. Adieu My...
I had hoped my very Dear Betsey that I should have had no occasion to write you again from this place—but our business unavoidably spins out the time beyond our calculation. It however now certainly draws to a close, and it is hardly possible that I should not be able to leave Philadelphia on Thursday. I ardently and anxiously wish to do it. Be assured of this, and exert your patience. Take...
I am thus far, My Dear Eliza, on my way to New York. But I am under a necessity of viewing the ground for Winter Quarters to day—which will prevent my being with you before tomorrow. Then please God I shall certainly embrace you & my Dear John. A thousand blessings upon you   Yrs. Ever ALS , the Reverend Alexander van Cortlandt Hamilton, Norwalk, Connecticut. H was returning to New York after...
I wrote to you, My Eliza, from Trenton. Yesterday afternoon I arrived at this place. I have yielded to the pressing solicitations of Mr. Wolcott to take up my abode at his house, which you know is at the corner of Spruce and Fourth Streets. Mrs Wolcott is in better health than she was but is still very thin and feeble. Without much more care than the thing is worth, her stay in this...
I expected with certainty my beloved Betsey to have left this place to day. Our business has consumed more time than was necessary. But that is not my fault. I cannot make every body else as rapid as myself. This you know by experience. Tis a consolation however that we cannot be detained much longer. It is difficult for Sloth itself to spin it out beyond this day & I shall fly to you the...
[ Poughkeepsie, New York, August 9, 1798. On August 9, 1798, Hamilton wrote to his wife : “I have just written you by the Post.” Letter not found. ]
I wrote to you, My beloved Eliza, by the Monday’s Post. You will be glad to hear that your dear boys & myself continue in good health & that they thus far behave well. I hope they will continue to do so—for in our mutual love & in them consist all our happiness. I trust you are by this time arrived & shall impatiently look out for a letter from you. Our public affairs continue to march in a...
I have not yet received a line from you since my departure. It is a consolation which my heart needs & which I hope not to be long without. As yet it is uncertain when I shall be able to return though I dare not now hope that it will be less than a fortnight from this time. The delay will be to me irksome. I discover more and more that I am spoiled for a military man. My health and comfort...
This is the third time I have written to my love since her departure. I continue to enjoy good health and my spirits are as good as they can be in her absence. But I find as I grow older her presence becomes more necessary to me. In proportion as I discover the worthlessness of other pursuits, the value of my Eliza and of domestic happiness rises in my estimation. Angelica & her family are all...
I am always very happy My Dear Eliza when I can steal a few moments to sit down and write to you. You are my good genius; of that kind which the ancient Philosophers called a familiar; and you know very well that I am glad to be in every way as familiar as possible with you. I have formed a sweet project, of which I will make you my confident when I come to New York, and in which I rely that...
Lest my Dear Eliza any circumstance should have prevented your departure before this reaches you, I conclude to drop you a line to tell you your Father is considerably better at the same time considering the delicate state of his health generally I am very desirous you should come up as he is. Yrs. Most Affec ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to...
I am just arrived my Dear Eliza at this place in good health and after breakfasting shall proceed on my journey. If I could be assured that your spirits were better and the health of yourself and Children good, I should enjoy much satisfaction from the agreeableness of the ride. The Country is truly charming. I remark as I go along every thing that can be adopted for the embellishment of our...
This, My beloved Eliza, is the third letter I have written to you since I left—but I am still without a line from you. I hope the Post of today will bring me one, or I shall be uneasy. We are getting on in our cause so that I expect to leave this place on Sunday or Monday. Your father is better again. All the rest of your family are well. They speak of you with tenderness and this you know...
I was quite disappointed and pained, My Dear Eliza, when I found, that the Post of Saturday had brought me no letter from you; especially as I was very anxious to hear of the health of my little Betsey. But I was consoled in the Evening by your affectionate letter of which Mr. Leguen was the bearer. It is absolutely necessary to me when absent to hear frequently of you and my dear Children....
I am arrived here My Dear Eliza in good health but very anxious about my Dear Philip. I pray heaven to restore him and in every event to support you. If his fever should appear likely to prove obstinate, urge the Physician to consider well the propriety of trying the cold bath—I expect it will, if it continues assume a nervous type and in this case I believe the cold bath will be the most...
We have reached this place for the night, after a very tolerable journey. I am in much better health than Spirits. The swiss-malady grows upon me very fast—in other words I am more and more homesick. This added to some other circumstances that do not give me pleasure at the present moment makes me rather heavy hearted. But we must make the best of those ills which cannot be avoided. The...
I believe my beloved that I omitted to write by the last Post thinking it would not find you at Albany; but as it seems possible from what Mr. Schuyler tells me that your stay may be prolonged I write this to say to my darling that I begin to [be] very anxious for her return & hope it will be accelerated. I was very glad to receive a favourable account of her health & spirits. AL [S], Hamilton...
I have received only one letter from my beloved Eliza since I left the city. I am very anxious to hear further and especially to know that my beloved Philip is recovered. My health continues pretty good—but I am excessively engaged with our cause. I impatiently wish it at an end that I may return to the fond bosom of my Eliza. If our Dear Angelica is returned remember me affectionately to her....
[ Philadelphia, April 19, 1799. On April 20, 1799, Hamilton wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton : “I yesterday informed my beloved of my arrival here.” Letter not found. ]
Tomorrow, My Dear Eliza, your Fathers slay leaves this place for New York. I drop you a line to tell you that I am well and that today the hear⟨ing⟩ of LeGuen’s cause began. I fear prepossessions are strongly against ⟨us⟩. But we must try to overco⟨me⟩ them. At any rate we shall soon get to the end of our journey; and if I should lose my cause I must console myself with finding my friends....
Your Sister Peggy has gradually grown worse & is now in a situation that her dissolution in the opinion of the Doctor is not likely to be long delayed. The Lt Governor sends the bearer to bring home his Child. I have not time to add more. Adieu My Eliza ALS , Mr. Andrew Joyner, Greensboro, North Carolina. H was in Albany attending the New York Court of Errors. See H to Elizabeth Hamilton,...
The lapse of two days more, my beloved Eliza, has happily diminished the term of my absence from you. It is the most pleasing reflection I can now make. My heart looks forward with delicious anticipation to the period of our reunion. Capt. Church arrived last night. This gives great pleasure to the ladies who wanted a beau . They persist in saying that they will leave this place with me on...
This moment my Dear Eliza, we descended from the carriage—after a journey, so far, much more comfortable than we could possibly have anticipated. It makes me repent that we had not pursued our original plan. But we must console ourselves with the hope of a speedy reunion which you may be assured I do every thing in my power to accelerate—For I give up too much of my happiness by my absence not...
I had strongly hoped My very Dear Betsey that our business would have ended this day & that tomorrow I should have begun my journey for New York but to my infinite chagrin I am obliged to submit to a further delay. It does not appear that we can now count upon leaving this place before Monday Morning. Then we rely that there will be no remaining obstacle & I shall fly to your bosom. Forgive...
I have been extremely uneasy, My beloved Eliza, at the state of health and state of mind in which you left me. I earnestly hope that there has been a change of both for the better. Let me entreat you as you value my happiness to tranquillize yourself and to take care of yourself. You are infinitely dear to me. You are of the utmost consequence to our precious Children. You have every motive to...
[ Plainfield, New Jersey, May 22, 1800. On May 24, 1800, Hamilton wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton: “I wrote to you the day before yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
We arrived here last Evening well and shall proceed immediately on our journey. I forgot my brief in the cause of Le Guen against Gouverneur which is in a bundle of papers in my armed Chair in the Office. Request one of the Gentlemen to look for it and send it up to me by the post of Tuesday. Beg them not to fail. Adieu My beloved. Kiss all the Children for me. Yrs. ALS , Mr. George T....
[ 1798 ]. “I am almost ready to abandon every thing & fly to you—But I am so entangled with war & law that it is impossible.” Copy, Columbia University Libraries.
I have just written you by the Post. This will be brought by Robert, who from the heat of the sun has become sick & is to be left here to return by the first Vessel. Fearing the same effect upon me (for the heat is excessive) I have resolved to moderate my movements, which will unavoidably occasion delay. But my Betsey will prefer my staying somewhat longer to my seriously risking my health....
I arrived here, My Dear Betsey, on Saturday in good health & not much fatigued. But I was immediately surrounded by a number of persons who engaged me till the hour of the Post had past by; so that I did not write as I intended. I cannot lose the opportunity of today; though I intend certainly to leave this place tomorrow in the Mail stage which arrives on Wednesday Morning. Mean time I...
I informed you My Darling by a letter which will go by post of my arrival here in good health and finding your family well. But this morning your papa has an attack of the Gout, not particularly severe, one indeed which in a different situation would give no uneasiness—but as his strength has been of late somewhat diminished, it is impossible not to feel anxiety about him. On the whole I...
I am just arrived here after a very comfortable journey. Our intention is to reach Albany on Wednesday morning, from which place I shall immediately write to you. I am less and less pleased with the prospect of so long a separation from my beloved family & you may depend shall shorten it as much as possible. Dumphey had planted the Tulip Trees in a row along the outer fence of the Garden in...
I intended to have reached Croton this Evening and would have done it without difficulty had not a very violent shower of Rain obliged me to stop at this place. If the storm subsides I hope to be at Albany on Wednesday. The roads are too bad for you to venture this part of the road in your carriage if you can possibly avoid it. The plan of going to Poughkepsie is best. Dont forget to visit the...
I wrote to you the day before yesterday, my dear Eliza, by Lieutenant Smith. Capt Church informs me he is going to send his servant. I embrace the opportunity of repeating my request for a pair of white Casimer breeches—if not already forwarded by Lt Smith. My health continues good and I am under a necessity of playing the game of good spirits—but separated from those I love, it is a most...
The affair, My Dearest Eliza, upon which I came here has come to a close. But unavoidable delays in bringing it to this point & the necessity of communicating the result must very much against my will keep me here till the departure of the mail stage tomorrow, which will restore me to my Betsey on the day following. I need not tell her how very happy I shall be to return to her embrace and to...
My avocation here my darling Eliza must detain me beyond the departure of the Mail stage but I expect certainly to leave town in the stage of tomorrow morning and still expect to reach New York tomorrow. Love to Angelica & Church. I shall return full freighted with it for My dear Brunettes Adieu ALS , Columbia University Libraries. See H to Elizabeth Hamilton, July 19, 1797 .
I am here, my beloved, & tomorrow shall leave it for Boston where I hope to arrive on Monday Evening. The next morning I intend to proceed for Providence & New Port where I shall take passage by water for New York. If I am fortunate in the passage I may hope to embrace you in Eight days from this time. Most tenderly yrs. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For H’s itinerary on his trip...
[ Albany, February 21, 1801. “I wrote to you my beloved from Poughkeepsie by post yesterday immediately on my arrival by Mr. Ephraim Hart of the tribe of Benjamin or Judah.… Mr. Burr, as a proof of his conversion to Federalism, has within a fortnight taken a very active and officious part against Renssalaer in favour of Clinton. Tell this to Mr. Church. And let me tell you what is of much more...
You will easily imagine, My Dear Eliza, how much I have been relieved by the Post of today. My darling infant is then recovered. Happy news and very contrary to my apprehensions! Let us unite in thanks to that kind being who has thus far protected our little family and ourselves and let us endeavour as far as in us lies to merit a continuance of his favour. You do not mention the receipt of...