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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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My knowledge of your condescension and goodness emboldens me to address you at present. I have at length prepared my History of New-England for the press, in which I have mentioned your illustrious partner as one of the first and most active promoters of the declaration of Independence. I have given a sketch of his speech on that important occasion from Ramsay. the whole is not inserted in any...
Last night for the first time I slept in our new House.— But what a Scene! The Furniture belonging to the Publick is in the most deplorable Condition— There is not a Chair fit to sit in. The Beds and Bedding are in a woeful Pickle. This House has been a scene of the most scandalous Drunkenness and Disorder among the servants, that ever I heard of. I would not have one of them for any...
I have been so overwhelmed with Business at the Close of the session of Congress and Since, that I have not been able to write you for several Days. M r Grove desired me to tell you that M r William Smith your Nephew is married to a very amiable young Lady the Daughter of a rich Father. What he means by a rich Father I dont know.— I congratulate you & Louisa on this Event. I cannot Say whether...
You will See by the Proclamation in the Public Papers that I have been obliged to convene Congress on the 15 th of May, and as it is probable they will Sitt till the Middle of July, this measure must make an entire change in all our Arrangements There are so many Things to do in furnishing the House in which I want your Advice, and on so many other Accounts it is improper We should live in a...
I cannot Say when I shall be able to sett out. But I shall loose no time here. When the Public Business is in such a state that I can leave it, I shall go, be the Roads as they may.— I expect bad travelling all the Way. Truxton has indeed taken the Insurgent. But We have a silly Insurgence in Northampton County in this state, which will detain me, I suppose, some days This state is not a moral...
Monday Morning, the most agreable in the Week because it brings me Letters from you, has not failed me to day. I have yours of 23 and 25 March. The Correspondence with Plymouth amused me much— The Answer is Superiour to the Letter both in Delicacy, and keenness.— You might have told her, if Chance decides in Elections, it is no better than Descent. But she knows not what she wants. The Letter...
You never rec d a Letter from Berlin but with Pleasure: and this I dare say will not be the first.— From Austins in a lowry Morning We proceeded to Hartford and dined at Bulls. A polite Invitation from the County Court to dine with them was declined, and We came on immediately to Squire Rileys. The Coachman thought it would be too hard upon the Horses to go to Wallingford I have now read all...
From Lovejoys at stratford We fixed off M r shaw with a part of the Baggage by the stage for East Chester. Mrs Smith and the fair Caroline came with me to Norwalk to dinner at Gregories, where We were very comfortable. We rode in gentle snow & rain all day and Arrived at Webbs at Night, where We put up till Monday. My Horses want a day of rest. From Quincy to stanford, within 22 miles of East...
Yours of 25 Ult. is rec d. — Thomas is to Sett off from N. York to day for Quincy and I wish him a pleasant Journey, which the fine Weather and convenient Snow promises. An happy Sight of his Friends, will come of course, without Accidents. He found his Father, forty Years Older than when he left him, and if he finds his Mother advanced only ten, it may be an agreable disappointment to him.—...
I rec d to day your fav r of 24 and it made the day more tolerable. Your health and Spirits always promote mine. We have had more Company to Day than ever upon any Occasion. Thirty or forty Gallons of Punch, Wine in Proportion and Cake in Abundance. The News by The America Capt n. Jenkins arrived at Newbury Port made every body gay but me. Not a Word of Thomas Boylston Adams. I shall be uneasy...
Yesterday only I rec d yours of March 1.— am surprized you should have rec d none from me from 11. Feb. I have written never less than once a Week, seldom less than twice and 9 Weeks out of 10, three times, ever Since I left you. The Roads or some irregularity of the Post must have occasioned your disappointment. I hope you will obtain Mr Mears, but I must leave every Thing to you— The Load of...
Three Vessells have arrived from Hambourg Since Thomas was there. The inclosed will shew you that he chose the Alexander Hamilton of New York. By this means he will escape the Dangers of our Massachusetts Bay; and I hope soon to hear of his Arrival. The General Officers nominated Smith for the command of a Regiment— I nominated him to the senate who, after a warm opposition and a day or two’s...
We have the Pleasure of your Letters to the 3d. I think it is not worth while to bid for M rs Veseys four Acres. The Price will be twice or thrice the Worth and I have no desire to enlarge my Borders by purchasing Such scraps. Indeed I have land enough and too much, unless I could attend to its cultivation.— In that Situation Land is an Object of Envy. And I am willing that some Tradesman...
Your Letter of the 25 Nov. has revived my heart. I rejoice at your real Recovery and hope it will be confirmed so that you may with the Advice of your Physicians come on this Winter to me. But I cannot bear the thought of your Attempting it, without their consent. I am of opinion with our Neighbours about the Barn. Barlow to Baldwin I have seen and despise the Letter as much as I have for some...
as soon as your Letter informed Us that M rs Brisler could not come without her husband I sent him off, in two hours, the day before Yesterday, i.e Monday. There has been Such a snow storm ever since that he must have had a bad Journey to N. York— Whether he will wait there for a Wind for Rhode Island or take the stage I know not but hope he will get home before you come away. This days Post...
I had no Letter from you Yesterday. As You intended to commence your Journey on the 24 th. it is not probable this Letter will meet you, till it returns to this Place. But as it is possible you might not be able to set out so soon, you may receive it at Quincy. Brisler is at Quincy before this, I hope. Charles is just gone, for N. York— I have communicated to him my Plan of sending my Coachman...
I have yours of the 6 th. by the Post of this day. I have proposed to Brisler to give him 300 dollars and pay the Expences of his Wife and Children to this Place and back again to Quincy, when they return— And He and his Wife and Children are to live in the Family. This is pretty well— I must and will have him. I am peremptorily for excluding all blacks and Molattoes. I hope to get into the...
This day you promis’d me to begin your Journey: but if the Weather is as disagreable with you as it is here, I could not exact the fullfillment of the Engagement. I fear you will have bad roads and unpleasant Weather. You talk of your Perplexities and say you must get out of them yourself. Do you think mine less severe, public or private? My dear and venerable Mother— Alass— I feel for her.—...
Yesterday, Tuesday when the Levee Room began to be thin Brisler came running in, with the delightful sounds “Sir, Mr Adams is up Stairs.” I was not long in mounting the escalier and had the high Pleasure of embracing my dear son Thomas after an Absence of four years & an half.— We had a very happy Evening and he has had a good nights rest after the fatigues of his Voyage & Journey. He seems in...
With a great deal of snow upon the Ground it is now plentifully snowing. There must be an unusual Quantity upon the Earth. I suppose you have it very deep. our Men and Teams must have had a terrible Jobb to get the Lumber home: but I hope it is all compleated e’er this. To Day at two D r Ewing & M r snowden are to dine with me and tomorrow at four about 30 senators and Reps.— I have not had as...
Your last Letter, which I have rec d was dated the 10 th. — I have one from M r Thomas at Brookfield of the 8 th. — I hope your ill turn was soon over and that your health is reestablished. What the ultimate determination of our son will be I cannot conjecture.— I would not overpersuade him. Phyladelphia is on many Accounts, a good place. My Inclination as well as yours is for Quincy: his for...
I have just rec d yours of 14 th. — it has laid in the Post office I suppose Since saturday. The subjects of M r J. Q. A.s Agents are horrible to me. I will therefore dismiss them. Thomas’s Predilection for Phyladelphia, I suppose will determine him.— Alass! Nelly is married poor Boy! and I suppose some of the Six sisters will catch the Child in the Trap without a Groat and without...
In my solitude in Markett street, I find nothing so sociable as your Letters— those of 18 & 20 th. are this moment recd d.— Your health & Spirits are a great Improvement of mine. I have avoided the Epithets perfidious and unprincipled as much as I could, but neither they nor any that could be borrowed from the Hebrew & the Greek would be too strong, for the House of Mass to Use.— My Religion...
We Stopped at the Governors to take Leave and he told Us the News of last night, which has regaled Us on the Road. We watered at Watertown and reached this Inn at half after one. We hope to reach Williams’s at Marlborough, and Sleep there this night. I strive to divert the melancholly thoughts of our Seperation, and pray you to do the Same. M rs Smith I hope will keep Up her Spirits and the...
Your Letters of the 21. 22. 23. and 26 of April are all before me— They have inspired me with all the Melancholly in which they were written. Our Mother and our Niece are gone to rest. The first a fruit fully ripe the last but a blossom or a bud.— I have Suffered for you as much as you have Suffered— But I could give you no Aid or Amusement or Comfort.— I pray God that these dispensations may...
I have rec d your Letters of 10. 15. and 16. Your solicitude for my Health may subside. I am pretty well— I had a cold, not a bad one— and something of the Inflammation in my face of last spring—but it is gone. Rush gave me such a Dose of Salts that I thought it not fit to go out to Congress next day. But the day after I was well enough.— I am Old—Old very Old and never Shall be very...
On Tuesday M r T. B. Adams left Us, at Eleven in the stage for New York & Boston and consequently Quincy.— I should have been glad to have held him till I could carry him with me: but I thought it my Duty to comply with his desire, both for his sake and yours.— He Seems determined to settle in Phyladelphia.— He would have a happier Life, and be a more important Man in Quincy: But I must do &...
From Rileys in Berlin, We went to Newhaven 26 miles to dinner at your Friends M rs Smiths who were very respectfully inquisitive after your health, and very sorry to hear an Account of it from me, not so flattering. A Visit from D r Dwight detained Us agreably for a short time but We found enough to cross the Ferry over the Housatonnac by sunsett and soon reached Lovejoys in this Town. We had...
We Spent Sunday at Stanford at Webbs went to Meeting forenoon and afternon, and on Monday went to Dinner at East Chester. Tuesday in a Violent Snow storm went into New York, dined & Slept at Charles’s. Wednesday crossed the Ferry and went to Elizabeth Town. This day We came five and thirty miles to this Place. From New York our poor Horses have waded and dragged the Carriage through Snow banks...
I rec d. to day your favour of March 29 th. I write you every Post day and send my Letter to the office. If they do not come regularly to you it must be owing to the office. It would hurt me to refuse the request of my Nephew Elisha Adams: but you gave him and his Mother all the Answer in your Power. If D r Tufts has any Money of mine in his hands, I should be glad if he would Supply my Nephew...