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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Abigail" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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I received at Töplitz, on the 3 d : of last month, your kind favour of 12. June, which I did not immediately answer, because I was then in bed, with a fever, which however confined me, only for about ten days, and since then my health has again been very good.— The principal motive of our Journey to Töplitz, I wrote you before I left Berlin. It was on account of my wife’s health, and with the...
It was fully my intention to have called upon you before I went with Mr Dana on the Western Circuit, either the last week or before next Friday, when he will set off for Northhampton, but I have been much afflicted with a cold which has confined me to my house and will prevent my visit. I flatter myself to have the pleasure of seeing you at Quincy upon our return— Having understood that the...
On the 11 th : inst t : I received your favor of the 4 th : and last evening, on my return from Mr: Breck’s Country seat, where I passed Friday & Saturday night’s, your’s of the 8 th : had come to hand. Same time, rec d : from William the poem you sent me for Miss Wister & his letter of the 6 th : I am obliged by all these things & newspapers to boot. Coopers address, valedictory, I now...
I have no letter from you later than the 4 th : which I mention only because the interval is a little longer than usual between your communications and lest any you might have written may have miscarried. From William I got a packet on Saturday, after my letter of that day was sent to town, otherwise, I should have acknowledged its receipt. In J Russells paper of the 15 th : which he enclosed...
I thank you for your kind letter of the 4 th : inst t : which came to hand last evening, accompanied by one from D r : Tufts, enclosed by William. My letters are left usually at M r : Wistar’s and Sarah when she gave me those of last evening—say’s “Thomas, I expect I have got a rich treat for thee; from the number of packets addressed to thee, I should judge thee a favorite among thy friends”—...
As I am in the City for a few days, you may wish me to write rather oftener than usual, to convince you that I am not ill. The weather since the month of June has been generally more than commonly favorable for this climate— it still continues so, and we begin to flatter ourselves that the City may escape the afflicting scourge it has heretofore experienced. The mortality which lately...
I am in possession of your favor of the 21 st : inst t : with the letter of my brother enclosed; they were both very acceptable and I return the enclosure with thanks for the perusal— I hope shortly to receive the letter, which he mentions having written me on the subject of his affairs; though I think they are in as good & safe a train as any disposition I could make of them— I have written...
I thank you for your favor of the 15 th : inst t : which reached me yesterday at this place, where I have been since the 15 th : and where notwithstanding your kind invitation & advice, I expect to continue until it shall be clearly ascertained whether the pestilential fever is to prevail or not in the City this season. I am out of the way of danger, if any should exist; and before the...
I have your favor of the 30 th : ult o before me, and thank you for your tender solicitude on account of my health, for which however I think you need not be particularly solicitous, since I am, excepting a few sensations peculiar to the climate of this City at this season, as well as usual; in addition to which I am on the point of leaving town for some weeks to reside at Germantown in the...
I received not untill last Evening your kind favour of Feb y : 10. which however is the latest date that I have from you, and this circumstance is of itself sufficient to give me great concern respecting the state of your health— The Boston Newspapers in April, mention likewise that you were again ill; but I have some comfort in hearing by a letter from D r : Welsh to his son, that you were...
I am commissioned by my truly distress’d Mother to say for her, that she cannot acquire resolution sufficient to adress you, but so greatful does she feel for your comforting and consoling letter, that she is hurt it has not met that attention it merited long before this she flatter’d herself week after week she should be able to write you. I am griev’d to add, she too much gives up to her...
In addressing a small publication to the President, I am naturally led to congratulate You upon your recovery from your late tedious indisposition. May you long continue to enjoy your present health, and to add by your kindnesses, to the happiness of all Connected with you.— Your Son Thomas calls now & then to see us, but not so Often as we wish. He is fixed in a part of the city which does...
I have your favor of the 15 th : inst t : and thank you for your kind solicitude respecting my health, which is just passable and no more— The extremes of heat & cold have a sensible effect upon my Constitution, and though I am tolerably free from rheumatics and faintness, yet I have the old complexion, with a tinge of yellow less perhaps than when I left you. My feverish habit still hangs...
The following production is one of my favorite children; it speaks to the heart, and without ornament, or personal beauty, is recommended by all the chaste virtues, and interesting attributes, of the most favored mortal.— I know not any Individual, to whom a model of conjugal excellence, of refined understanding, and attractive accomplishments, can with more propriety be devoted, than to the...
Your kind favor of the 2 d : inst t : found me as you conjectured at Philadelphia, fixed in my lodgings & in possession of my Office, which however is too far removed from the Court house & the seat of business. I was unwilling to give up the advantage of living in the family where I am, because in case of the fever appearing in the City, the same lady has a place of her own at Germantown to...
I left Philadelphia the 9 th : inst t : and after passing a few days very pleasantly at Baltimore in the society of M r : Johnsons family & that of Mrs: John Smith, came to this place where I had the satisfaction to meet M r : Cranch in tolerable health & spirits. I have been received & treated with uncommon hospitality and politeness in both these places, from the first characters, and as no...
I have to acknowledge the receipt since I wrote you last of your two kind favours of 15. November and 1. February last— The latter is the latest letter, from America that I have, and I still continue to receive as I have ever since I have been in Europe, received from you the most recent intelligence both public and private— As in this case the first direct notice of my brother’s arrival came...
It was with much pleasure I yesterday received yours of 1 st instant, as it was an assurence of your better health, I hope the return of Spring will bring to you renewed health & strength, but it is needful for your friends to caution you, as you partake too much of the spirit of Martha & are apt to be too careful & encumbared about many things. The Presidents being at home, will bring more...
It is a long time since I have written to you— My mind has been so agitated that I was not fit to write—or in other words, when I sat for a moment, & attempted to write my paper became so blotted, that I was asshamed to send it— Now do not attempt to reason; for I should feel so conscious that its dictates ought to be obeyed, & so little able to comply, that this would prove another source of...
After a long period of deep concern, and anxiety, on account of your health, I feel myself in some measure relieved by the receipt of your kind letter of 2 nd Dec r :, which I received the day before yesterday; that which you mention as having written me on the 15 th of November, has not yet come to hand. At the same time, I received from M r Pitcairn at Hamburg a line, mentioning, that the...
I cannot Say when I shall be able to sett out. But I shall loose no time here. When the Public Business is in such a state that I can leave it, I shall go, be the Roads as they may.— I expect bad travelling all the Way. Truxton has indeed taken the Insurgent. But We have a silly Insurgence in Northampton County in this state, which will detain me, I suppose, some days This state is not a moral...
I have been so overwhelmed with Business at the Close of the session of Congress and Since, that I have not been able to write you for several Days. M r Grove desired me to tell you that M r William Smith your Nephew is married to a very amiable young Lady the Daughter of a rich Father. What he means by a rich Father I dont know.— I congratulate you & Louisa on this Event. I cannot Say whether...
I received your letter of the 14 th of Feb. yesterday— I enclosed to you this morning Browns paper containing the report of the committee, to whom was referred the petitions &c requesting the repeal of the Alien & Sedition bills &c. It was drawn up by Mr. Goodrich of Con t. and is a most masterly production. I think you must be pleased with it. The report was made the order of the day for...
I have just rec d yours of 14 th. — it has laid in the Post office I suppose Since saturday. The subjects of M r J. Q. A.s Agents are horrible to me. I will therefore dismiss them. Thomas’s Predilection for Phyladelphia, I suppose will determine him.— Alass! Nelly is married poor Boy! and I suppose some of the Six sisters will catch the Child in the Trap without a Groat and without...
Your last Letter, which I have rec d was dated the 10 th. — I have one from M r Thomas at Brookfield of the 8 th. — I hope your ill turn was soon over and that your health is reestablished. What the ultimate determination of our son will be I cannot conjecture.— I would not overpersuade him. Phyladelphia is on many Accounts, a good place. My Inclination as well as yours is for Quincy: his for...
My little Abby—has been sick with a slow intermitting fever, occasioned by a cold—which has thrown many round us into fevers— The Dr has just been here, & says that disorders opperate strangely, many whom he thought out of danger, are seized again—Some in their heads, lungs, & several have died with repeated voilent billious cholicks—but we have not lost any one in the Town as yet— It has been...
I have just received your letter of the 8 th of Feb. and feel grieved to find you in so low spirits and so unwell, but flatter myself that the sight of your son (whom I hope has long before this happily arrived,) & his excellent company will revive your spirits and restore your health. The snow has almost entirely left us and we have had some days of the past week as pleasant and warm as we...
With this I send you two more copies of the dispatches— A defence of the Alien & sedition bills Divernois letter, Giffords address to the Loyal association &c the pamphlet setting forth the pernicious effects of stage plays. The last mentioned pamphlet was sent to the president the night after he went to the theatre and another quaker sent two more the Evening after.— they are grieved to the...
I have just rec d yours of Feb. 1. and thank you for the Book.— We had one before, from the Bookseller here who has them for sale. D r Tufts may draw. You had better engage the Oats. French may have Belchers place. Congress will not Sitt longer than March: and I calculate upon Weeks too—But fear I shall be detained some time after Congress departs. Last night I must needs go to the Play and...
Yours of the 2 d of Feb. I received this morning— The president says he cannot blame you for not writing oftner because you write two to him to his one—but could he write as freely as you can and had he as much leisure he should write you every day. Last Evening we went to the play. Secrets worth knowing & the children in the woods constituted the entertainment. The plays were good but the...
There is a class of men in this country, possessing some public confidence, but entirely destitute of any moral principle, whose whole lives are spent in the prostitution of their talents to the perversion of reason—whose unceasing endeavors are to mislead the public mind— to obstruct public business and by the aid of cavil, misrepresentation and artificial odium, to deprive the government of...
Yours of 25 Ult. is rec d. — Thomas is to Sett off from N. York to day for Quincy and I wish him a pleasant Journey, which the fine Weather and convenient Snow promises. An happy Sight of his Friends, will come of course, without Accidents. He found his Father, forty Years Older than when he left him, and if he finds his Mother advanced only ten, it may be an agreable disappointment to him.—...
On Tuesday M r T. B. Adams left Us, at Eleven in the stage for New York & Boston and consequently Quincy.— I should have been glad to have held him till I could carry him with me: but I thought it my Duty to comply with his desire, both for his sake and yours.— He Seems determined to settle in Phyladelphia.— He would have a happier Life, and be a more important Man in Quincy: But I must do &...
Indeed my dear Madam, I was very happy to receive a letter from you, after hearing you had been so very ill, at the time I wrote, I did not know you was so dangerously sick, or I would not have troubled you; That Health may be restore’d, that your day’s, may be free from Complaints, and that your nights, may be blessed with quiet sleep, is the ardent wish of your friend: I hope soon, to hear...
After many expecting, anxious hours for my dear Nephew, I am made happy by seeing his safe arrival announced in the Newspaper— The fibres of my heart cannot remain untouched, while my Sisters must be filled with joy, & gratitude— I claim a share, & feel that I am a maternal Participant— I know that you long to clasp your Son in your fond arms— When he reaches Peace-field you will think the...
In my solitude in Markett street, I find nothing so sociable as your Letters— those of 18 & 20 th. are this moment recd d.— Your health & Spirits are a great Improvement of mine. I have avoided the Epithets perfidious and unprincipled as much as I could, but neither they nor any that could be borrowed from the Hebrew & the Greek would be too strong, for the House of Mass to Use.— My Religion...
I have had the pleasure of seeing and perusing two or three letters from you to my Father and M r Shaw since my arrival here, and have learnt with joy that your health is better than it has been for some time past. Do not be impatient for my coming on, for I shall certainly make no unnecessary delay, and unless I should take a run to George town for a moment, I shall set off for Boston on...
I am almost dead with a horrid cold and fear that before I shall half finish this letter I shall drown it with water, from my eyes. I wish I felt well and in good spirits enough to give you an account of the presidents ball— it was brilliant indeed, and the ladies were drest and looked almost too beautiful. The president enjoyed himself much better, than he would have done, had not Cousen...
Accept dear M rs Adams, my congratulations upon the New year, together with the many pleasing circumstances with which it has commenced, among which the restoration of your health in so great a measure, and the return of your Son, after so long an absence, cannot but give real pleasure to all your friends. I dont see, that 4 years has made any alteration in his person or manners.— The...
Yesterday, Tuesday when the Levee Room began to be thin Brisler came running in, with the delightful sounds “Sir, Mr Adams is up Stairs.” I was not long in mounting the escalier and had the high Pleasure of embracing my dear son Thomas after an Absence of four years & an half.— We had a very happy Evening and he has had a good nights rest after the fatigues of his Voyage & Journey. He seems in...
I inclose a letter to my Mother under Cover to you, because it contains some things which perhaps might give pain to my father in his present weak state of health. You will be so kind therefore as to give it to my Mother in such a manner that she may have it in her power to communicate only such parts as she may think proper. I am rejoiced to hear of your recovery from the dangerous illness...
I have received your letters of Jan. 3 d & 6 th with all that pleasure & gratitude which so much good counsel deserved. I do love to read your letters. Before this reaches you, you must have heard of Cousen Thomas’s arrival at N York, from whence he wrote to you. He arrived in this city this afternoon, & is very well. It would do you good to see how happy it has made Uncle. I wish Aunt was...
I thank God, it is now in my power to give you the pleasure you desired of receiving from me a chearful Letter. This Moment they brought me from the Post Office a Letter from our dear Thomas dated the 12 informing me of his Arrival at New York. He will come on to Phyladelphia and only laments that he cannot have the pleasure of embracing both his Parents at once. His Passage has not been...
We have the Pleasure of your Letters to the 3 d. I think it is not worth while to bid for M rs Veseys four Acres. The Price will be twice or thrice the Worth and I have no desire to enlarge my Borders by purchasing Such scraps. Indeed I have land enough and too much, unless I could attend to its cultivation.— In that Situation Land is an Object of Envy. And I am willing that some Tradesman...
As you are frequently receiving letters from your good Sister, you have in that channel all the news we have in this quarter. We are, at present enjoying a good measure of health, tho’ the Season has been uncommonly severe. we have had a greater quantity of snow upon the earth in these parts for a month or five weeks past, than perhaps has ever been known so early in the Year.— Mis s. Betsy...
I have seldom known it to be colder at the Eastward than it is here at present. Although I have a very large fire & my desk almost into it, still my fingers ache & the ink scarcely runs from the pen. I sent you a few days since Logans address, attempting, like his brother traitors, to vindicate his conduct. Thus did Arnold, Munroe & Randolph and thus do all traitors, Logans says in his address...
Three Vessells have arrived from Hambourg Since Thomas was there. The inclosed will shew you that he chose the Alexander Hamilton of New York. By this means he will escape the Dangers of our Massachusetts Bay; and I hope soon to hear of his Arrival. The General Officers nominated Smith for the command of a Regiment— I nominated him to the senate who, after a warm opposition and a day or two’s...
I rec d to day your fav r of 24 and it made the day more tolerable. Your health and Spirits always promote mine. We have had more Company to Day than ever upon any Occasion. Thirty or forty Gallons of Punch, Wine in Proportion and Cake in Abundance. The News by The America Capt n. Jenkins arrived at Newbury Port made every body gay but me. Not a Word of Thomas Boylston Adams. I shall be uneasy...
I hope you have health enough to bear to share with me some of my Griefs. I have determined to do a Thing this day, which puts my Phylosophy to a Tryal. The Lt Gen. and Major Generals have recommened Col Smith to the Command of a Regiment. This is a Degradation of him to which I would not consent, without his Consent. I have written to him hoping that he would forbid the nomination. But his...
’Though I have been writing a very long letter, to my wild, random, laughter loving Walter and have made it very late, still I want to thank my aunt for her letter of Dec 20 th received yesterday morning, before I sleep. Logan is chosen Representative for this State by a very large majority. It so happened that the day, L took his seat, a new carpet was placed on the floor of the house. The...