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For your affectionate Address on my retireing from public life, I beg you to accept my grateful acknowledgments; And be assured, that no circumstance can tend more to sweeten the few remaining years of my life, than the pleasing remembrance of my services having been approved by those who have participated in the arduous struggle to establish our Independence, or to regulate the important Era...
On the 11 th of Decr I wrote you a long letter; and intended before the close of the last Session of Congress (which ended on the third instant, conformably to the Constitution) to have addressed you again; but oppressed as I was with the various occurences incident thereto, especially in the latter part of it, it has not been in my power to do so during its continuance; and now, the...
Quoi que Les Circonstances m’aient Empechée de participer a toutes Les fettes publiques, ou Se Sont manifesté a La fois deux Sentiments bien diffirent; La joise de votre naissance et Le regrés de votre retraïte, croyes Monsieur que je n’ai pas moins été affectée des mème Sensations, et quoi qu’Etrangere et Sans interet personnel au dernier de ces Evenements important, il m’est impossible de ne...
Your favor of the 27th Ulto reached me in the forenoon, & the Salmon in the afternoon of the 3d instant; and merit, & receive, my particular thanks. The latter regaled a number of Gentlemen at an entertainment given by the Merchants of this City on the 4th. I shall thank you (when re-published) for the refutation of the impudent forgeries of letters, carrying my signature, which Mr Bache has...
I have received from our Freind Doctor Rush the Letter you did me the favor to write of the 22nd: of Jany: last—my Name is Enoch Edwards, and that was directed to John Edwards—which was the Reason of its laying with him so long. I send you the Papers I mentioned from Mr: Monroe . If you would do me the Favor to take breakfast with Me on Wednesday Morning, at 9 or 10 oClock (or your own hour) I...
The package, containing your various beautiful presents, is arrived— I have distributed them according to your desire, and am requested to return the most grateful acknowledgements, and to tell you that being given by you, renders them peculiarly valuable— Accept my thanks my beloved friend, they are the return I can offer except the most tender and sincere affection— As a token of your...
Necessity compells me to make the within request, that is if you will be pleased to grant me Forty Dolls which shall be Imediately repaid on my return from Boston, I should not have deignd to make the request, But relying on your Generosity—I had every expectation of receiving of receiving Money from Congress, but was dissapointed, owing to my not laying the Papers before the House sooner in...
I am honored with your letters of the 13th & 20th of Feby, the former of which, being an answer to my last, shall be first attended to. After I had sent that letter to the post office, it occurred to me, that what I had viewed as a studied neglect might have been intended as good policy; & being convinced it was so, by reflecting on the subject, I was highly gratified by the explanation with...
1796 Augt: 13th Alexander Hamilton Esqr: To James Robinson for fence 42 boards @ 1/ £2–2. 32 half Do: @ /6d 16. 18 posts @ 2/ and 12 lb Nails @ ½ 2–10.  7 days Labour carpenters @ 11/ 3–17.  4 Loads cartage @ 2/ 8. £9–13 Received New York March 7. 179[7] of Alexander Hamilton the amount of the above account being for the use of the lot of John Barker Church in broad way. DS , Hamilton Papers,...
60[Diary entry: 7 March 1797] (Washington Papers)
7. A hard No. Wt. [wind] all day. Hard frost this morning & but little [sun] all day—snowing at times. Mer. at 24.
I send herewith the Seal you was pleased to commit to my Care—The time has been scarcely sufficient for the purpose. The Letter to Mrs Ferguson has been forwarded with one from myself, in the manner you requested. As I may not have the pleasure of seeing you again before you leave the City, permit me once more to express my most affectionate wishes for your health & happiness, and most...
Pardon the liberty an unknown person, assumes, by calling you brother; we are so by nature, having one common father, which is Adam; but we are particularly so, in being both members of an order, as ancient as it is honourable—whose principles are “brotherly love relief and truth”—whose ornaments are “wisdom strength and beauty.” Emboldened by the last consideration, I hesitate not in...
I hope you will not deem it intrusion to address you upon a subject which is of great consequence to me, and must interest your feelings on the principles of Commiseration and Benevolence: a subject which necessity impells me to expatiate upon—and maternal affection dictates. It is Sir, to solicit, (earnestly) an office for M r: Clarkson to enable him to support a Family of young Chilldren—...
The Secretary of the Treasury respectfully transmits to the President of the United States, a communication from the Commissioner of the Revenue, covering two Letters to him & from the Collector of Providence on the subject of a proposal made to the said Collector for fixing & maintaining the stakes and Buoys in Providence River. It is the opinion of the Secretary, that it is adviseable to...
65Memorandum, 8 March 1797 (Adams Papers)
drew an order for 2000 Dollars Warrant issud Same day. I indorsed it the 9th. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
On the 28 ulto. the Bank of England stopped payment in Specie. And since every Bank in Great Britain has followed the Example; the Directors say the Bank is more than Solvent, exclusive of their capital Stock invested in the Funds. Committees of the two House of Parliament, which have examined the affairs of the Bank, confirm by their Report the Declaration of the Directors, and Associations...
You have herewith the Copy of a letter from Mr Bridgen to me & my reply which you will cause to be delivered, if they will apply to Mr Nicholson the business will be accomplished with him but if they possitively will not, I must request you to adjust the matter on my behalf on the best terms & longest time you can obtain. I am impatiently waiting an Answer to my last letter on the business...
[ New York, March 8, 1797. On March 9, 1797, Morris wrote to Hamilton : “I have this moment received yours of yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
69[Diary entry: 8 March 1797] (Washington Papers)
8. Very thick morning with sprinkling rain clear afterwards with a brisk So. Westerly wind. Mer. 52.
I wrote You on 1st And since have Yours of 27 Ultimo with Mr Carters letter —I now beg leave to hand reports of last week. And nothing particular having Occured since my last leaves me little matter of information—especially as I hope You will soon be at Your Seat, when this paper correspondence will be exchanged for my letter—As directed I forwarded your letter to Mr Carter And a Note from...
Your conduct during a six Years residence in my family, having been such as to meet my full approbation & believing that a declaration to this effect would be satisfactory to yourself & justice requiring it from me, I make it with pleasure. And in full confidence that the principles of honor, integrity & benevolence wch I have reason to believe have hitherto guided your steps will still...
Green and Mullin have published the two first numbers of the examination &c and I have delivered to Green three others including No. 5 & to Mullin No. 3—these will I expect appear in the papers as they come out and are all I have yet seen. If they are continued it wod. be well to have them inserted in Bache’s paper which I receive but by no means regularly by the post. On the 30th. Octr....
I have no Letter this Week and begin to fear that your Respect to our late P. has laid a foundation for a Sick Spring and Summer. Sometimes too I am jealous of unfair Play in the Post office to prevent me from hearing from you at the most critical Period of my Life. The public Papers must give you an Account of Proceedings, which I am wholly unable to describe. What Judgment is form’d of my...
The health of David Austin Esqr. the present Collector of the customs in New Haven, is declining so fast, that it is generally supposed that death, will put a period to his valuable life within a short period time. As that office will then be vacant, I thought it to be my duty, in as early a season, and in as respectful a manner as possible, to ask it of Your Excellency for myself. Perhaps an...
Le plus sincere homage que je croye pouvoir Rendre à L’opinion qu’a L’Amérique entiere de vos vertus, & La Liberté que je prends de vous adresser Les observations que je publie Sur la Discussion qui Existe malheureusement aujourdhui entre les Etats-unis & La République de france. quelque soit le jugement que vous porterez sur mes opinions à cet Egard, je me flatte que vous Reconnaitrez dans...
I have this moment received yours of yesterday with the deed to Mr Cottringer for which accept my thanks. Mr Ralph Mather the last endorser of the bill on which Mr Bridgon threatens to bring suit, has opened a negotiation here with Mr Nicholson respecting it, and as I hope an arrangement will be made so as to satisfy the owners of sd Bill you will be good enough to prevail on them to wait the...
77[Diary entry: 9 March 1797] (Washington Papers)
9. Wind changed to No. Wt. blew very hard & turned very cold. Mer. at 28. Left Phila. on my return to Mt. Vernon—dined at Chester & lodged at Wilmington. Accompanying GW and Mrs. Washington on the trip home to Mount Vernon were Nelly Custis and the marquis de Lafayette’s son, George Washington Motier Lafayette (1779–1849), accompanied by his tutor, Felix Frestal. George Washington Parke Custis...
Thus far we have arrived safe, but found it disagreeably cold. To give the greater surety to the large looking Glasses, and such other articles as are liable to be injured by the jolting of a dray; be so good as to have taken down by hand, and stowed where they will not be trod on; or tossed about in the Vessel’s hold. The grate (from Mr. Morris’s) pray have packed first in some of the old...
The best Receipt for the Sausage—is to send you one which I wish you to take home and try. In the Autumn at the time you kill Hogs— take all the Skin off of the leaf Lard—and in every one wrap up as much sausage Meat—as will Make about the size and Shape of a neats Tongue (which can be done by a little Practice) —it requires no sewing—just slap it over while wet and it will stick. Mrs: Edwards...
[ Greenock, Scotland, March 10, 1797. On May 2, 1797, Hamilton wrote to William Hamilton : “Some days since I received with great pleasure your letter of the 10th of March.” Letter not found. ] William Hamilton was H’s uncle and Laird of Grange, Ayrshire, Scotland .
New York, March 10, 1797. “… You will oblige me by letting me know what have been the laws & practice of Maryland with regard to naturalization—pointing me to the parts of its Constitution & laws which respect the subject. I have under consideration an important question of Insurance in which this inquiry is necessary.” ALS , Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Tilghman was born...
Rec’d five hundred dollars of William Cooper on account of Mr. Churchs Mortgage on lands in Otsego County. Dollars 500 Some months past 1000 1500 DS , anonymous donor. Cooper, the founder of Cooperstown, New York, was appointed judge of the Court of Common Pleas for Otsego County on February 17, 1791. From March 4, 1795, to March 3, 1797, he was a Federalist member of the House of...
83[Diary entry: 10 March 1797] (Washington Papers)
10. Dined & lodged at Elkton. Tolerably pleasant all day. “At Elkton . . . Hollingsworth’s is a quiet orderly Tavern, with good beds, and well in other respects” ( GW to Elizabeth Willing Powel, 18 26 Mar. 1797 , ViMtvL ). “We encountered no adventures of any kind, & saw nothing uncommon, except the light Horse of Delaware, & Maryland, who insisted upon attending us through their states”...
The General Assembly, which convened at East Greenwich on the twenty-seventh of February, having continued in Session until the Night before last, I had not the Opportunity of transmitting the inclosed Address. I have now the Pleasure of doing it, and of assuring you that I am, with every Sentiment of Esteem and Respect, Sir, Your most obedient, and Most humble Servant LS , DLC:GW ; LB ,...
We arrived at this place to dinner and shall remain all night. To morrow we shall proceed but slowly. As I have missed the Post of this afternoon, and another does not happen until Monday it is probable this letter will not reach your hands in time. If the case however should be otherwise, and you have means to accomplish it, let me request you to provide for me as usual new Carpeting as will...
Like a true Woman (as you will think) in the Moment of Exultation, and on the first Impulse (for you know we are never supposed to act Systematically or from attentive Consideration,[)] I take up my Pen to address you, as you have given me a complete Triumph on the Subject of all others on which you have I suppose thought me most deficient, and most opposite to yourself; and what is still more...
Yesterday only I rec d yours of March 1.— am surprized you should have rec d none from me from 11. Feb. I have written never less than once a Week, seldom less than twice and 9 Weeks out of 10, three times, ever Since I left you. The Roads or some irregularity of the Post must have occasioned your disappointment. I hope you will obtain Mr Mears, but I must leave every Thing to you— The Load of...
88[Diary entry: 11 March 1797] (Washington Papers)
11. Snowing from day light until 10 Oclock—in the Afternoon a little rain. Breakfasted at Susquehanna—dined & lodged at Hartford. “At the Ferry, on both sides, are good Taverns: Mrs. Rogers’ on the East, & Mr. Barney’s on the West. From thence to Hartford (commonly called Bushtown) twelve miles from the ferry, a good house used to be kept but ... it was to be sold the Wednesday after we passed...
J: Beckley’s compliments to Mr: Madison. Mr: Jefferson will take a family dinner with JB—to morrow at 3 o’clock. Will Mr: Madison join us? RC (owned by Charles M. Storey, Boston, Mass., 1961).
I recieved with great pleasure your letter from Varina, and though I never had a moment’s doubt of your love for me, yet it gave me infinite delight to read the expressions of it. Indeed I had often and always read it in your affectionate and attentive conduct towards me. On my part, my love to your sister and yourself knows no bounds, and as I scarcely see any other object in life, so would I...
Yours has been duly recieved , and the clover seed goes tomorrow in the schooner Industry, Capt. Green bound for Richmond. It is addressed to Chas. Johnston, and is in 3. casks containing 3 1/8 bushels each, of which 4. bushels are for yourself and the rest for me. It will be desireable to have it forwarded immediately, and of preference by waggon. I shall be at home the 19th. or 20th. and...
After a week of anxious expectation, I received by last Thursdays post, a packet containing three News papers a pamphlet, two excellent Letters from our Dear sons, and fourteen lines from a hand, from which I was desirious of receiving, fourteen times as much. unreasonable do you exclaim! Publick Buisness, publick cares, allow’d, but there is a kind of communication and intercourse which is a...
93[Diary entry: 12 March 1797] (Washington Papers)
12. Lowering, but tolerably pleasant. Breakfasted at Websters. Dined & lodged in Baltimore. Met & escorted into town by a great concourse of people. websters : “Thirteen miles from thence [Harford] a pretty good Inn is kept by one Webster. From that to Baltimore is 14 Miles” ( GW to Elizabeth Willing Powel, 26 Mar. 1797 , ViMtvL ). GW’s entrance into Baltimore was described in a contemporary...
To partake of the prosperity arising from your unwearied attention to the Welfare of our Country—To admire that firmness which has never been disconcerted in the greatest difficulties, and which has acquired vigor in proportion to the exigency. To feel that honorable ascendancy you have obtained in the well founded opinion of your fellow Citizens by a Wise administration, and the exercise of...
Your favr of the 27th ulmo came to hand three days ago just when I was puting into the Office a Letter of congratulation to meet you at your assylum from the Labors of a weighty Trust. Abstracted from self I can withdraw from an high Idea of the importance of our Loss and am capable of exulting in the calm delights of the Man I love and whom e’er long I may have permission to call by the...
As I ride on matters occur to me and I shall take the chance of mentioning them to you before you may have left Philadelphia. A boat was bespoke, but no direction given either for the payment or mode of getting it round. My credit is at stake as it respects the first, and my interest as it regards the second, and I shall be obliged to you for seeing how both can be promoted. It is incumbent on...
I wrote you by the last mail, and add this by Mr. Jefferson. Lest my last should by any possibility have miscarried, I repeat my request that my name may not be suffered to get on the Poll for the County election. If Mr. Jefferson should call & say any thing to counteract my determination, I hope it will be regarded as merely expressive of his own wishes on the subject, & that it will not be...
I have recieved no letter from you since that which you wrote on your departure from Madrid . That gave me reason to believe you would come over early in the spring, and having been ever since in the daily expectation of your arrival I had suspended writing to you. Having come on here for a few days to qualify into office, and being now on my return again, I avail myself of the opportunity by...
I take shame to myself at this late acknolegement of the receipt of so many of your favors: but the fact is that while I was here in my former office, it’s unremitting duties obliged me to interdict to myself the pleasure of private correspondence. On return to my farms I felt myself, tho’ an old man, yet too young a farmer to hazard any thing in the line which you are so firmly and usefully...
I have been longer in acknoleging the reciept of your favor of May 28. 96. than I would have been but for the constant expectation of procuring the seeds you desired (one kind of which was to be sent for to Kentuckey). This, the Buffalo clover, is in a packet which accompanies this letter: as also the wild pea which you wished to recieve, and I promised to send you. I have added some seeds of...