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Documents filtered by: Author="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 181-190 of 262 sorted by editorial placement
The inclosed letter dated February 26. 1800, from Jacob Mayer, Consul of the United States at Cape Francais, should have accompanied the Secretary of State’s report made to the President this morning, relative to the Consul General, Doctor Stevens, and the Consul Mayer. The Secretary stated that he had not received from the Consul Mayer an answer to his (the Secretary’s) letter of the 18th of...
On the 25th I was favoured with your letter of the 22d. The first measure of calling Congress together had been determined on by the President the preceding evening; and I had the draught of the proclamation inclosed, in my hand, to present to him, when I received your letter. Some other of the measures suggested had been contemplated; and all will receive attention from me & my colleagues. I...
I believe I mentioned in my last, that I was going to sketch a state of facts relative to Mr. Pinckney’s mission for publication. I now inclose it. That the facts should be known to our citizens was deemed important. I thought it highly important that the Representatives should come together impressed with the sentiments of their constituents on the reprehensible conduct of the French...
I received your letter of the and accord with your opinion that the proposed publication of the intelligence from Genl. Pinckney should be omitted. The “emigrant” we conclude to be Perigord, formerly bishop of Autun. Sometime since, I was informed that he left this country with signs of enmity towards it; and the Directory would naturally place great confidence in his opinion: and yet it is so...
In contemplating the idea suggested by you, of arming the merchant vessels of the United States for Defence only , a difficulty at once presented. This measure is incompatible with the right of a belligerent power to visit and examine neutral vessels, to ascertain whether they have on board contraband goods—&, where a treaty does not alter the law of nations, whether they are laden with...
[ Philadelphia, October 21, 1797. On the back of a letter which Hamilton wrote to him on August 27, 1797 , Pickering wrote: “returned the paper inclosed Oct. 21. 1797.” Letter not found. ]
I have to-day received your letter of the 1st inclosing a letter from Colo. Fleury, dated the 21st. of February last, with powers to receive & remit to Europe the amount of his dues from the U.S. which he hoped to receive in six months. He will be uneasy at not hearing from me in near eleven months, and will lose the benefits which the possession of the money might have yielded. These...
I duly received your letter of the 17th. No apology will be necessary for a communication of your opinion at any time; and at the present crisis your opinion is peculiarly acceptable. Prior to the receipt of your letter, the President had determined to recommend the observance of a general fast; and had desired one or both the chaplains of Congress to prepare the draught of a proclamation....
The inclosed I wrote last evening for your information. This morning I received your open letter of the 23d. As soon as a vessel shall be dispatched for France with letters of recall to our envoys, I presume the President will communicate their letters to Congress—whether demanded or not. If the envoys or any of them should be found in France (of which there is a bare possibility) they are to...
This morning the dispatches from our envoys are published, and I inclose a copy. In your letter of March 27th in answer to mine of the 25th just then received, you say, “I shall write again to-morrow.” I have received no letter from you since that of the 27th. which I mention on the presumption that you may have written, and because if you have, it is important on every account that it should...