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The News papers which I do myself the honour of enclosing are the remains of Mr. Adams’s subscription. Mr. Adams left this place on the twenty eighth of June for Rotterdam, (with Mr. T. B. Adams) whither I had the pleasure of accompanying them. He requested me to send to you, Sir, the “Nouvelles Politiques” and I rejoiced in the opportunity of at once following his wishes and of paying to you...
Though I have neither the right nor the power of filling that space which Mr. Adams left here in his pleasing relation of a correspondent, I indulge myself from feelings of respectful personal attachment in at least one duty which I know he always was attentive to, and shall continue to send to you the “Nouvelles Politiques,” as was his custom. As soon as I saw Mr. Adams’s appointment to the...
I yesterday had the pleasure of a letter from Mr. Adams dated the 20. July at London—Since that date by English papers I perceive he enjoy’d the happiness which we here anticipated for him—He was marry’d to Miss Louisa Johnson on the 26th. July. Probably this may be no news to you sir & Mrs. Adams before this letter arrives, but the intelligence of so very pleasing an event as the marriage of...
A few days since I did myself the honour of enclosing a few of the Nouvelles Politiques—& now have the pleasure of sending a few more. The papers afford a prospect of politics, of party & of events that gives me little to add. From all I can collect from private sources I certainly expect very soon a great explosion at Paris. The Directory have appealed in a degree to the Armies, & the armies...
I have the honour of enclosing for you some of the Annales Politiques. Those of past of August & September went under a blank some time since; others at different times I have done myself the honour of transmiting to you Sir—accompany’d by a few lines. By a letter which I have just received from Mr. Adams, the minister to Berlin, he was on the 26th. inst. at Hamburgh on his way to Berlin. On...
Mr. Adams left Hamburgh, for Berlin, on the 31. Oct. & is I hope safely arrived there—I have not heard from him since the 26th Oct., when he had just landed at Hamburgh—as I had the honour of informing you Sir. Lepeaux, of whom no body heard before he got into a palace & his cap & feathers, says, America, Government and all, are Venal, & bought by Pitt!—This he announced in the midst of his...
I had the honour of receiving your letter which you were so good as to write to me, yesterday—& beg leave to assure you that I feel in the approbation which you have been pleased to bestow upon my letters a great reward, Sir, at least, most anxious moments, & zealous endeavours in the service of my country—The times in my view of things, have been, & still continue tremendous—They will Sir be...
The papers, some of which I have received as late as 8. May & one of 26. May, have after so long a pause of uncertainty thrown me into a tumult of feelings almost to tears. I see with a pride sustained by active domestic sources of greatness, the rising energies of America spreading over that surface of the public mind which reflection had matured into a mass of stability, fit to support all...
If an Embargo is laid here it is contrary to the wishes of 110. 382. 1260. I have had an interview this moment, and received 472. 1591. 921. 672. 948. 418. 1508. 464. 1218. one was laid it 1480. 463. 351. 1546. 1398. 1261. 432. 227. 1586. 464. 1308. 1326. 1546. 799. 1245. 1589. 536. 142. 227. To you Sir I hope and believe that I shall not apply in vain that measures of vigour may not be...
In a late dispatch in June to the secretary of state I mentioned Mr. Pichon late secretary to Genet and Fauchet last a secretary in the bureau of foreign affairs on the American side of the office at Paris & now French secretary of legation here.—I promised this gentlemen in the third interview about three weeks since (for I wished to make him talk freely knowing that his opinions have helped...
I had this evening a visit from (the name is on a loose paper). After informing me of the exertions of Mr. Schimmelpeninck cipher and Admiral de Winter at Paris the agents of this Government —to recal France to a just respect for the commercial interests of this country. he told me from a letter From the latter which he showed me that France had not commanded the Commissary of Marine at...
I have the honour to enclose you a Duplicate & to inform you that the same language has been held to me Since—& that this government have assured me of their conviction that the letter enclosed in the Leyden paper marked X may be considered as evidence of an amicable Disposition, as they say they have taken pains to ascertain that point from motives of self-interest—These motives I believe Sir...
My very worthy Secretary Mr. Bartolemew Dandridge is so animated with the energy which our country displays, & so devoted to the fair and honourable cause of the government over which You Sir preside as to request me to apply to You for a commission in the army. As he has the honour to be known to you Sir I need only to add that ever since he has lived with me he has daily risen in my esteem....
The inclosed is from Mr. Talleyrand to Mr. Pichon who left this place the 24th Sepr. for Paris. In many interviews which this gentleman sought with me, with much solicitude, I had repelled the idea that “the Assurances” declared by you Sir in your message in June, had been given in any of Mr. Talleyrand’s letters that I had seen; to this I added among many other remarks that nothing but a...
As Mr. Rand, a good American, sails in a lettre of Marque from the Texel direct for Boston, I take the liberty of sending some gazettes, which remain of those which I could not consistently with an eye to postage , send through the Secretary of State. They may amuse you after the labours of Philadelphia, & contribute to brush away those public cares which ought not to follow you in the...
I have just seen in a newspaper your Messages of the 18 & 25th. Feby last.—An unexpected honour always makes a man of any candour look into himself, and the examination terminates as it begins, in grateful feelings towards him who confers it—And in those tumultuous emotions in which apprehension has a greater share than hope. You Sir to whom I have been long known will do me justice in so...
I this moment received the inclosed official letter , an answer to the one from me, of which I inclose a copy, and do myself the honour to forward it sir to you under a hope that it may meet you at Braintree before the copy of it reach the Secretary of State. I inclose in another letter a copy of it to him— as this is a duplicate by the same post through another hand. I had sent duplicates to...
Meeting with a safe hand going to London the other day I did myself the honour of sending to you through Mr. King a pamphlet written lately by Boulay (de la Meurthe) of the 500. It is a very remarkable work—a view of the causes of the English Revolution by Cromwell & of its failure. He forces the lines of events when they run at all together into a parallel—& to my mind absolutely with a view...
1308.535.1419.1573.1115.1109.773.1129.1399.238.1074.1276—1133.705.1235.894.870.536.213.1268.318.1589.225.1421.948.506.1399.1546.53.879.1546.137.—1546.671.227.1115.710.1245.1115.1162.1546.624.1399. The fleet is off Texel with a large body of troops on board & though the French may send a strong force, as yet they have not a formidable force, not more, I now think than 20,000 at most, and these...
Should my letters to Mr. Talleyrand have the misfortune to be considered by you Sir as too complaisant—a thing I do not believe to be probable—I entreat your attention to the light in which I view’d the circumstances which produced them. These circumstances relate to the subject matter of the act which I was ordered to inform Mr. T. of;—to Mr. T. himself, as the minister of exterior Relations...
I was extremely flatterd by the confidence which your letter by Mr. Colbert proved you have in my disposition to follow your wishes. A letter from you is no affair of ceremony—it is an obligation on any man who flatters himself with the hope of your personal esteem. Mr. C. gave it to me yesterday. I immediately in particular addressed a letter to Bonaparte, & made use of your name, wh. I was...
Though I did myself the honour of writing very lately to you, the pleasing event of which a letter this morning from Hamburgh gives a prospect, induces me rather to trespass upon your patience than to omit for a moment the intelligence that there is every reason to expect the liberation of M. Fayette. I will extract part of Mr Williams’s (the Consul’s) letter of 22d Augt —he says that “Mr...
The late event which has taken place at paris will probably tend too much to the injury of America not to be extremely interesting to you. The storm which the Directory have for several months excited against the council of Five hundred has at length burst & the papers & letters announce the arrest of Fifty Four members of that body by order of the Directory on the Fourth inst. The two members...
In the haste of Captain Izard’s departure the copy of a letter of which I spoke was omitted in mine of the date of yesterday—but as he waits at Rotterdam for a wind, the copy which was not quite ready when he left this place, goes under cover in this. The letter as you will see is without place of Date, except the Initial & concluding letters of the word Paris, from whence it came ⟨ mutilated...
The day before yesterday I recieved a letter from Mr Williams, consul at Hamburgh, in which he informs me that M. La Fayette and his family were expected there on the next day—the Fourth Inst. —That all the family, except Madame la Fayette & one of her daughters, were well; & that they would probably embark in the Ship John, for America, if the health of the ladies permitted. I had written to...
I do myself the honour of informing You that the Peace between France & the Emperor was settled & the Treaty signed at Udina on the Seventeenth of Octr. The French Have all the limits which they have gained during the war, adjoining their territories—& Belgium expressly ceded to them—They have also all the Venetian Islands below the gulph of Lodrino in the Adriatic, as Corfu, Zante, & in the...
Letter not found: from William Vans Murray, 26 July 1799. On 26 Oct. GW wrote Murray : “Within the space of a few days, I have been favoured with your letters of the 26th of July. . . .”
Letter not found: from William Vans Murray, 9 Aug. 1799. GW wrote Murray on 26 Oct. that he had just received a number of letters from him, including those dated the “9th and 17th of August.”