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Documents filtered by: Author="McHenry, James" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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The Secretary of War respectfully takes the Liberty to transmit to the President of the United States, a statement of his recollection of the substance and incidents of the Conversation which passed between them the evening preceding the Resignation of his office, committed to Writing immediately afterwards. He also transmits Copies of sundry papers having reference to certain parts of that...
The Secretary of war respectfully takes the liberty to transmit to the President of the U. States, a statement of his recollection of the substance and incidents of the conversation which passed between them the evening preceding the resignation of his office, committed to writing immediately afterwards. He also transmits copies of sundry papers having reference to certain parts of that...
I respectfully take the Liberty to state to you my recollection of the substance and incidents of the conversation which passed between us on the evening (the 5th instt) preceding my Resignation of the Office of Secretary for the Department of War. I dined on the same day with Mr Nicklin, and was at table when informed that my Servant waited at the door to see me. He brought me a Note which...
I enclose to your care a number of letters for General Wilkinson, which you will be pleased to deliver to him, in case he should arrive at your quarters, previously to your leaving the Army. I am Sir with great respect Your obedient servant ( LS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
I placed Mr. Stoddert (who acts as Secretary of war under a temporary commission) this morning about 11 o’clock in the chair I have usually occupied; I then formally laid upon his head eight volumes of the “code militaire” by Briquet with Caesars commentaries in French; kept them upon it ’till he was nearly stupified, when I pronounced him duly installed and as well qualified to discharge the...
Have our party shewn that they possess the necessary skill and courage to deserve to be continued to govern? What have they done? They did not (with a few exceptions) knowing the disease , the man and his nature, meet it when it first appeared, like wise and resolute patriots: they tampered with it, and thought of palliations down to the last day of the late session of Congress. Nay their...
Do you possess enough of the second sight to tell me what our friends have done and intend doing to the Eastward? God forgive me, if I make false calculations about them or deliver myself up too easily to dreams and reveries. I see nothing ex cathedra in that division of Country from which I can augur a determination adverse to the election of the present chief. Johnson says somewhere, in his...
In Maryland from causes which you will easily comprehend it will be extremely difficult, if at all possible to bring the federalists generally into vigorous action, in favour of Mr. Adams, and yet from the force of the impulse which has been given to the people before the subject could be understood, it is likely, whether the electors be chosen by the people, or the Legislature, that Mr. Adams...
I recd. this morning your letter dated the 27 Ulto. with the one at first intended for Major Jackson. I sincerely beleive that there is not one of your friends who have paid the least attention to the insinuations attempted to be cast on the legitimacy of your birth, or who would care or respect you less were all that your enemies say or impute on this head true. I think it will be most...
Mr Wolcott informed me by a letter recd yesterday evening that he was to leave the seat of Government (on a visit to his family) to day. He goes by way of Lancaster & I expect will pass through to New York in which case I pray you to give him the inclosed letter. If any accident should prevent his seeing you, be pleased to send it to him. It will shew you what I think of things here and my...
I received your letter of the 13 inst yesterday evening. [Altho’ I am not pleased at the facts attached to my name, in your letter to the President, having been brought into public view, without my consent, I can conceive nevertheless what might have prevented you from not requesting it. This supposed reason has weight if the facts could be considered of consequence, still however, in a case...
What is past and cannot be amended between friends had better be forgotten. Let it be so if you please. I am content. I have since your last reflected upon the policy & necessity of your replying to the answers to your animadversions on the character & conduct of the President, and incline to beleive that it would be wiser to suspend, for the present any further publication on the subject....
I have recd. a letter from Mr. W. this morning in which he says. “I have made enquiry respecting the declaration of Mr. Adams while in London in Nov. 1783—it seems he thought negociations could be better conducted there than in a foreign country, and observes—‘Here with the most perfect politeness to ministers we may keep them in awe; a visit to a distinguished member of opposition, even...
I received your letter of the 4th inst on Saturday last. After giving as much consideration as I could to the subject of the election of a President, which I perceived from conversation with some of the members of Congress who were here at christmas was likely to assume a serious form, it appeared to me that the proper line for the federal party to pursue in the case, was, to acquiesce with a...