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William B. Davie Alfred Moore Danl. Smith Landon Carter Alexander Outlaw North Carolina { William Davie . Of Halifax North Carolina. Was a member of the Convention which framed the Constitution of the U.S. Is a good federalist, a good lawyer, a member of the legislature of N. Carolina and well acquainted with the people of Tenissee. Alfred Moore . Perhaps a man of more genius than Mr. Davie....
Constitution. Lieutenants. 1 2 3 & 4. Benjn. Lee Boston. Isaac Hull. Do. Richard O’Beal, Massachusetts. Wm. H. Wattles Connecticut. David Phipps Do.— James Hodge Philad. John Augustus Spotswood Virginia Edward Wyer of Mass. Midshipman Marines. John Wm. Livingston. N. York Lemuel Clerk Boston. Oram N. Carolina. Henry Caldwell. Vermont. Frederick Dalcho. Maryland. Surgeon. Read. Surgeon’s Mates....
Once more at home, and I flatter myself recovered from the fatigues of your journey. You have witnessed on your route the great affection and attachment of the people and the sound part of the community, which is still visible in every company I go into, and which I am persuaded will not diminish, though the external marks of it may gradually be less strongly expressessed. This is the least...
I have received to-day your letter of the 3d inst. which contained the agreeable account of your safe arrival at home, and the objects with which you are surrounded. I am not sorry to hear that you have found so immediate employment; for altho’ I wish the hammering business was over and the smell of the oil gone I do not think either so great an enemy to happiness as having nothing to do. I...
The quantum and kind of defensive force necessary at this juncture, and which it appears to the Sery of War, Congress ought to make immediate provision for, may be calculated, 1st with reference simply to France; and 2dly with reference to France and Spain united. This force, calculated with reference to France only, will have for objects; the protection of our commerce; the securing our...
Yesterday Mrs Murray Mr Murray and Mr Dandridge left this City for Amsterdam. Mr Dandridge had reced your letter on Saturday. He has left a thermometer with me for a post in Jersey. It is a present from you, but what is the name of the post, and where does he live? I believe in my hurry I have not detailed the facts to you respecting Gen. Pinckney as particular as I ought. The principal are as...
Conceiving it proper that you should be informed of the arrangements, regulations and instructions, relative to the most important objects in the department of War, I have caused the same to be copied, and herewith respectfully submit them— With the greatest respect / I have the honor to be / Sir / Your obed servant MHi : Adams Papers.
The letter you sent me has been confined to myself; but the other letters you have written on the same subject, has in your successor at least created some unpleasant feelings. Where opinions clash, and where superiority is made too apparent something a little like envy will come into play especially should a suspicion take place that pains are used to gain proselites. I have this moment...
I enclose you a further request on the subject of the paper communicated to you in my last, that you may have the whole before you and that you may aid me with your talents and experience. It strikes me that, it will be proper for the Pres. to state to Congress the species of defensive force necessary for the occasion, and consider it an essential attribute of negociations I had given him in...
The Secretary of War, in conformity with the desire of the President as expressed in his letter of the 14th instant has the honour to submit the following suggestions. 1st Question. It is difficult to fix the precise point at which indignity or affront from one state to another ceases to be negotiable without absolute humiliation and disgrace. For the most part it is a relative...
I have the honour to submit the reflexions which have occurred to me on the questions contained in your letter of the 14th ulto. With respect to your letter of the 15. I shall give it as early an answer as circumstances will permit, and intreat that you will ascribe the delay to the pressing business of the office and importance of the subject. With the greatest respect I have the honour to be...
The Secretary of War in conformity with the orders of the President has the honour to offer the following observations and suggestions relative to the objects of the Presidents letter of the 15th Ulto. With respect to the speech. It appears adviseable that it should be chiefly if not wholly confined to the foreign affairs of the country giving to these with France the primary and prominent...
I received your letters and papers. I added to them, but changed nothing, for the train of ideas in both ran in the same channel and embraced the same objects. The speech extenuates nought—recommends proper measures—promises a fresh attempt at negotiation—and declares the principles by which administration mean to be governed, in other words that the President will follow the principles of the...
I think it probable that there will be a house of representatives to-morrow and perhaps a Senate on tuesday, the speech of course will be on Wednesday. The speech will state the circumstances which have induced to the call of Congress; express a sincere desire that accommodation may take place; inform, that a fresh attempt will be made to endeavour to effectuate the object; recommend in the...
I wrote you a line yesterday acknowleging the receipt of your late letters from Albany. I expect that there will be a quorum of both branches to-day. It appears that the news of the Emp. of Germ. having signified his intention to make peace was unfounded. Had it even been so, it ought to have augmented our endeavours to meet hostility. It is probable that a new character will be given Pinckney...
In conformity with the request contained in your letter of the 30th relative to an augmentation of artillery & cavalry and arrangements for a provisional army, I have the honour to subjoin the following observations and statements. In order to have a fair view of the subject it may be proper to premise what is the force on the present establishment, and the how it is distributed. It may...
I have been very much occupied since I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 29th of May, and even now am very far from being a man of leisure. From the late events in Europe, there is ground for beleiving that England will be forced to accept of terms of peace, unless indeed France inebriated with victory, should require cessions which even the spirit of opposition would revolt at....
You will hardly stand in need of the inclosed paper to convince you of its writers principles altho’ it may be necessary as a proof of his criminal intentions. It is to be laid before Congress to-day. There are some circumstances that would induce a belief that there is more of French in the plot than British; altho’ Chisholm actually had conversation last winter with the British minister on...
Yesterday after hearing councel the Senate expelled Mr Blount. Mr Tazewell voted against his expulsion upon very frivolous ground. The affair makes a good deal of noise I mean talk without the plot or project being understood. You will see by the inclosed reports to the President the further disclosure of French projects. It would seem as if nothing short of a dismemberment of the union, and...
The President is requested to return the inclosed letter &c after having perused it to the Secy. of War. Israel Chapin is agent for Indian Affairs. With great respect I have the honor to be Sir / Your most obt. DLC : James McHenry Papers.
I have recd and read the enclosed. I think the advice contained in the last paragraph ought to be adopted. Mr J—— will say to Dawson “that inasmuch as you have expressly told Mr M—— that in your opinion his motives were malignant and conduct dishonorable, that he would advise you against throwing it into a more formal challenge, it resting with Mr Munroe to submit it to the expressions or...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the Indians on the North Western frontier give indications of their desire to remain at peace and under the protection of the U. States, notwithstanding the various efforts that have been made to debauch them. They have consented that the line of limits should be run, (with an exception by Little Turtle) agreeably to the Treaty of Greenville and the...
I have received this morning your letter of the 17th inst. Mr Jones is without your letter of the 4th to Mr Monroe, and the want of it delays the publication. With respect to the papers inclosed to you by Mr. Tillery. I wrote to McKee on the 25th of July ulto. “I will state to you briefly the difficulty which prevents any final determination at present on the two propositions which respect the...
I have the honor to inclose the last letters which I have received from and written to Brigadier General Wilkinson viz From General Wilkinson 2. July 7. 1797 1. July 29. 1. July 30. 1. 2d. August To General Wilkinson Copies of the 21. and 25. July and 11. August. From David Henley. one of the 1. August with its references and one from Lieut Piercy Smith Pope of the 28. June with two papers...
Since my letter of this morning which inclosed the last dispatches I had from General Wilkinson and others, I have thought it proper to write to the General relative to the subject of Mr. Powers’s mission, to prevent should any thing have delayed Cap Guion at Massac, any misconceptions on his part. I submit a copy of it. As I had sent off the original to which this letter refers, it is...
The recent death of Doctor Way has left the office of treasurer of the mint vacant, to which Mr John Knap a native of Maryland, but for some time an inhabitant of Philadelphia wishes to be appointed. This gentleman some time since produced to me recommendations from the Governor of Maryland, the Chancellor and one or two private gentlemen of that State in whom I have confidence, which bore...
I received at this place your letter of the 1st of Sepr. instant with its several references. I have been attacked here with a bilious fever from which I am getting slowly better, a restoration to my former state of health being impeded by the business I have been obliged to attend to and having no assistant to copy for me except a youth my nephew. The inclosed papers from No. 1 to No. 5...
I was too much hurried with business before leaving Philada to answer your last letter of the 14th of Augt and since my arrival here I have had a bilious fever, and more business than if I had remained in Philada, according to which reasoning I ought not to answer it now. The fact is I perhaps should have suspended the pleasure a little longer, if I had not received to-day the enclosed letter...
The inclosed dispatches from Brigr. General Wilkinson were received the 28th of Sept. ulto. The next day I thought it proper to write a letter to Capt. Guion (a copy of which is annexed) to prevent him from mistaking his duty or misunderstanding any longer the instructions I had sent him, which to me had appeared sufficiently explicit. He seems however to have got tired of one thing, I mean,...
I received by yesterdays mail your dispatch of the 20 September Ult. Major Lovell sent it from Pittsburg and expected to be here in a few days. The Spaniards it seems have thought proper to make a new move on the Chessboard and fall down the Mississippi. I shall offer no opinion as to its object: It is enough that it serves to discredit them among the Northwestern Indians who will find some...
I have the honour to submit the following letters and copies of letters and to request that the originals may be returned with such orders as you may think proper. vz. No. 1. Copy of a letter dated the 16th of Octbr. to Brig. Gen. James Wilkinson. No. 2. (a) Instructions to Capn. Pierce dated 16 Octbr. (b) Instructions to a detachment expected from Tenessee at Massac. (c) Instructions to Majr....
I had the honour to receive your letter under date of the 15th of this month on the 20th inst. In conformity with your desire therein, that I should commit to writing such things as I might judge necessary to be communicated or recommended to Congress at the opening of the session I beg leave to report as follows. It does not appear to me from any thing that has come to my knowlege, that...
The inclosed copy of a letter to the Accountant for the department of War, dated the 11th: instant, with his answer of the same date, is respectfully submitted for your consideration. I have been induced to make this representation from the Accountant’s having refused to countersign a Warrant drawn by me agreeably, as I conceived, to my powers, and the practice of the Office; of the general...
The Secretary of War begs leave to sub mit to the president certain facts and considerations which respect the situation of his department. 1. That the appropriation for the Salary of Clerks in the War Office is Four thousand and forty Dollars. 2. That this Sum was for a certain time thought sufficient for Seven Clerks. 3. That finding it inadequate to their support it became necessary in...
Will you assist me or rather your country with such suggestions and opinions as may occur to you on the subject of the within paper. Some of the questions it contains are very important, and an immature step or a wrong policy pursued or recommended respecting them may become extremely injurious or beget disagreeable consequences. I am sure I cannot do such justice to the subject as you can....
I have been for a long time past so hurried and so loaded with business as not to have a moment which I could devote to private correspondence. This is not an apology for neglect or indolence. I am exceedingly sorry it is true, because I foresee, it may without some change become quite unsupportable. Enjoy your happy situation; or if it is to be disturbed, let it be only by transient domestic...
I have received this moment your letter of the 28th ulto. The land business being with Mr Wolcott I shall give him the letters and see that they are forwarded by to-morrows mail and the inquiry aluded to made of the Deputy Surveyor if found. Munroe’s memoir has been little read and has made no converts to his party. He has I think sunk in the public opinion. Fauchets publication has done no...
I have recd. the result of my request to you and cannot be otherwise than pleased with it and thankful to you for it. The inclosed is my first conceptions on certain past transactions in which you were a participator and perhaps adviser. I believe every thing was then conducted as it has been since, after due deliberation and for the best. It is however no easy matter to account for the great...
In obedience to the request of the President the Secry. of War respectfully submits the following observations, on the subject of his reference of the 24th of Jany. ulto. It is an undoubted fact, that there is a very general indisposition to war in the minds of the people of the Untied States, and that there is a considerable part of them still peculiarly averse to a war with the French...
I have transferred your certificates and received your interest. I have also paid to Mr. Wolcott 40 20/100. I will pay to Mr. Lewis 7 dolls who says he does not recollect that you owed him any thing. I have retained 100, and herewith inclose the balance or 21 36/100. If this should find you at New-York I intreat you to spare an hour or two to the essay, and to send it to me as soon as...
The Secry. of War, respectfully submits the following result of his reflexions, on the questions propounded yesterday by the President. Q. Will it be advisable to present immediately to Congress, the whole of the communications from our ministers in France, with the exception of the names of the persons employed by the minister Talyrand, to exhibit and enforce his requisitions for a bribe,...
I have the honor to inclose a report, and documents, in the case of Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Rochfontaine Commandant of the Corps of Artillerists, and Engineers. I am Sir / with much the greatest respect / Your most Obedient / Humble Servant— James McHenry War Department 6th: April. 1798— To the President of the United States. The Secretary of War respectfully reports. That certain Charges...
I shall in a short time be able to get to sea, one or two of our frigates, and perhaps, in less than six or seven days, Cap Dale, in the Ganges, a lately purchased vessel. Can you spare an hour or two to help me to the instructions that it will be proper to give to their captains. Our ships of war, it is probable, will meet with French privateers, who may be in possession of our merchantmen,...
The Secretary of War will immediately be called upon, to furnish instructions, to the commanders of the armed vessels, destined to the protection of our coast, and to act as convoys to our trade. It becomes in consequence his duty, to suggest such circumstances, as require the most serious deliberation, and are connected with this subject. The power of the President, must be considered as...
I have just recd. yours of the 1st. I have calculated to be able to leave this on Wednesday, to examine the harbour of New York, and to with the aid of the best advice I can procure, determine what further works can be constructed out of the means that can be spared. Be kind enough to Tell Col. Stevens to have a pilot boat engaged and the proper apparatus ready to take depths and ascertain the...
I had reckoned upon the immediate arrival of the Secry. of Marine when I wrote you that I should leave this City for New York to-day. He will not be here before Friday. I cannot of course set out sooner than monday. I have requested Lt. Col. Doughty to join me at Brunswick, and will bring with me one Hill who possesses information which may be useful. Yours sincerely ADfS , James McHenry...
I arrived here yesterday about 7 O’clock a.m. and after breakfasting visited Governor Island Bedlow & Oyster Islands. I intended to have devoted to-day to the Narrows, the East and west bank and Sandy Hook, but have been prevented from executing my purpose by the rain. I shall therefore occupy part of t-day in preparing some questions for the consideration of the New York military committee,...
The Secretary of war, requests the opinion of the gentlemen composing the military committee of New York on the following particulars, with such observations, as they may think proper to favour him with, relative to the defence of the harbour and City. Supposing batteries & block houses to be established at the following points vz. a battery at Sandy Hook, opposite the middle ground; three...
I have the honor to submit, the enclosed papers Nos. 1. to 4 inclusive relative to my proceedings at New-York. I am Sir / with the greatest respect / your most obedient / humble servant. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
(Confidential) Dear Sir. Philad[elphia] 26 June 1798 I have received your letter of the 2 2d by to-days mail. If you could know how much I have had to do, and how much I have been compelled to neglect to do, since I received your letter inclosing one to Parker, and the other of the 6th of May, you would most heartily and readily pity and forgive me, had I utterly overlooked the several matters...